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Adour at the St. Regis


oakapple
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That still leaves ambiguity for those of us who were hoping for an Alain Ducasse signature restaurant in the Michelin-three-star style of ADPA and Le Louis XV. Had he announced "Alain Ducasse at the St. Regis," we would be assured of a commitment to three-star dining. The announcement of "Adour" could indicate a range of outcomes.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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That still leaves ambiguity for those of us who were hoping for an Alain Ducasse signature restaurant in the Michelin-three-star style of ADPA and Le Louis XV. Had he announced "Alain Ducasse at the St. Regis," we would be assured of a commitment to three-star dining. The announcement of "Adour" could indicate a range of outcomes.

I had the opportunity to speak with the sommelier of the new restaurant at the St. Regis on Monday. They are thinking about opening another fine dining establishment in new york not before 2008. The restaurant in the st regis is planned as a less formal, more "approachable" one; one that is wine centered.

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  • 8 months later...
That still leaves ambiguity for those of us who were hoping for an Alain Ducasse signature restaurant in the Michelin-three-star style of ADPA and Le Louis XV. Had he announced "Alain Ducasse at the St. Regis," we would be assured of a commitment to three-star dining. The announcement of "Adour" could indicate a range of outcomes.

The latest buzz seems to suggest that Ducasse is indeed aiming at three Michelin stars. There is a heavily PR-massaged piece in this week's New York that certainly suggests the place will be dripping with luxury. The job qualifications mentioned in an ad this month on Craigslist, also point at the high end.

In a shameful blog post yesterday, Ed Levine took it as given that Ducasse is aiming at three Michelin and four NYT stars, and proceeded to make the case that the world doesn't need any more restaurants like that.

I haven't seen a menu yet, and the restaurant's website is still hidden behind a password firewall. It is reservable on OpenTable, however. According to FloFab, service begins on January 28th.

Edited by oakapple (log)
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ducasse is not going for michelin stars. he is going for great cuisine and luxury.

i'm about to drop a bomb on the nyc foodie buzz for ducasse on how fucked up the st regis is taking care of that entire mess - and what is really going on there with regards to how they treat employees.

7 page article in ny mag that came out yesterday....

and also - why gray kunz left in a huff. (anyone else remember the mysterious closing of lespinasse? i do.)

Edited by chefboy24 (log)
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ducasse is not going for michelin stars.  he is going for great cuisine and luxury.

i'm about to drop a bomb on the nyc foodie buzz for ducasse on how fucked up the st regis is taking care of that entire mess - and what is really going on there with regards to how they treat employees.

7 page article in ny mag that came out yesterday....

and also - why gray kunz left in a huff.  (anyone else remember the mysterious closing of lespinasse? i do.)

I would love to know more about this. Even via PM.

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ducasse is not going for michelin stars.  he is going for great cuisine and luxury.

Anyone who accomplishes the latter stands a very good chance of accomplishing the former, especially when his name is Alain Ducasse.

Especially when the executive chef, sommelier, and restaurant manager are the same as at the old restaurant.

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Perhaps Chefboy meant NY Times stars? :hmmm:

The whole post seems unnecessarily cryptic.

Sorry. It wasn't meant to be. It was more of a reference to the perception as widely discussed on the Bruni thread to Frank Bruni's apparent distaste for fancy and "fussy" restaurants, which almost by definition Michelin 3star restaurants are. While not necessarily true, it seems as if shooting for 3 Michelin stars may necessitate not pandering to Frank Bruni's perceived tastes and therefore being less concerned about NY Times stars. :smile:

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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The website, http://www.adour-stregis.com/, now counts down the days, hours and minutes to opening. There is still no menu or indication of price.

I had the opportunity to walk into Adour this evening, said hello to my old friends, and had a complimentary glass of Lanson champagne. The room is beautiful. The computers at the bar are amazing. The prices are similarly surprising. The tasting menu is $110. The appetizers average $22 and the entrees about $45. They are some carryover dishes from ADNY. The Baba is not on the desert menu.

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$110 for a tasting menu is cheap, especially given those a la carte prices.

Although Ducasse's ambitions for this restaurant are perhaps debatable, one also wonders if this is to be considered one of his flagships. I would argue that when Ducasse got three stars for ADNY it became one his de facto flagships even if most diners would hold it beneath the Paris and Monte Carlo restaurants. Will be interesting how diners and, perhaps more importantly, the press react to and portray this new venture.

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I can assure you they are going for 3 Michelin ***.

i can assure you they are not.

i was hired in october by thomas combescot (after 6 interviews), the ex wine director of alain ducasse at the essex house and current wine director of adour. i have spoken to everyone in charge there and i am certain of this. lets just say for me now.... it didn't work out, and i'm very happy. i will explain further when i have a second to breathe, as i'm working about 70 hours a week right now and loving it.

Edited by chefboy24 (log)
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I can assure you they are going for 3 Michelin ***.

i can assure you they are not.

The prices posted upthread tend to support chefboy's assertion that this isn't intended to be Michelin 3* establishment. However, chefboy's statement that "Ducasse is not going for michelin stars" — implying he would be pleased with zero — is ludicrous.
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I can assure you they are going for 3 Michelin ***.

i can assure you they are not.

The prices posted upthread tend to support chefboy's assertion that this isn't intended to be Michelin 3* establishment. However, chefboy's statement that "Ducasse is not going for michelin stars" — implying he would be pleased with zero — is ludicrous.

Then again, Ducasse would not be the first great French chef to spurn Michelin stars. Alain Senderens closed Lucas Carton only to open a much less expensive restaurant in its place and Joel Robuchon has not catered to Michelin either. It is much less expensive to state that one doesn't really care about garnering more Michelin stars. That does not necessarily mean that one doesn't care about putting out a great product. Besides if Michelin or the NYT comes out and awards less than the maximum, they can say they weren't going for it anyway. Should either still award the maximum number of stars, that only enhances the legend. In addition not going for Michelin stars does not necessarily equate with being happy with zero, it may simply mean that they are not shooting for a specific star score.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I can assure you they are going for 3 Michelin ***.

i can assure you they are not.

The prices posted upthread tend to support chefboy's assertion that this isn't intended to be Michelin 3* establishment. However, chefboy's statement that "Ducasse is not going for michelin stars" — implying he would be pleased with zero — is ludicrous.

Then again, Ducasse would not be the first great French chef to spurn Michelin stars. Alain Senderens closed Lucas Carton only to open a much less expensive restaurant in its place and Joel Robuchon has not catered to Michelin either. It is much less expensive to state that one doesn't really care about garnering more Michelin stars. That does not necessarily mean that one doesn't care about putting out a great product. Besides if Michelin or the NYT comes out and awards less than the maximum, they can say they weren't going for it anyway. Should either still award the maximum number of stars, that only enhances the legend. In addition not going for Michelin stars does not necessarily equate with being happy with zero, it may simply mean that they are not shooting for a specific star score.

There is a very nice write up on Adour in Today's New York Sun. The article discusses the wine focus of the restaurant. In addition, it is unlikely that with the kitchen staff largely unchanged from ADNY that the food won't be wondeful.

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My understanding is that Benoit is a Michelin one-star-type project, that Adour is a Michelin two-star-type project, and that Ducasse hopes to do a three-star-type project down the road (presumably this will be somewhat contingent on the success of Benoit and Adour). Several people connected to the Ducasse organization have told me this, though none officially.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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My understanding is that Benoit is a Michelin one-star-type project, that Adour is a Michelin two-star-type project, and that Ducasse hopes to do a three-star-type project down the road (presumably this will be somewhat contingent on the success of Benoit and Adour). Several people connected to the Ducasse organization have told me this, though none officially.

that is what I was told as well.

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