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The Kimchi Topic


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#1 torakris

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Posted 02 March 2003 - 02:54 PM

What's your favorite kimchi?

What is one of the most unusual ones you have eaten?


Check out this site for some less common examples:

http://www.kimchi.or...kind/index.html

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#2 Jaymes

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Posted 02 March 2003 - 07:18 PM

I don't know if it's "unusual" or not, but my favorite one is one I make with green onions.
"And you, you're just a stinker."

#3 Jason Perlow

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Posted 02 March 2003 - 07:27 PM

What's your favorite kimchi?

What is one of the most unusual ones you have eaten?


Check out this site for some less common examples:

http://www.kimchi.or...kind/index.html

Thats a cool website, Kris.

I love ALL kimchi but I particularly like the ones made with radishes.
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#4 Pan

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Posted 02 March 2003 - 08:31 PM

I like that website, too.

Some foodstuffs mentioned there are not familiar to me: for example, dropwort. But the most intriguing item was the sesame leaves. I had no idea that any part of the plant other than the seeds were eaten. For that matter, I don't know what a sesame plant looks like or where it's most commonly grown (in the U.S., California, no doubt :biggrin:).

#5 torakris

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Posted 02 March 2003 - 09:03 PM

I like that website, too.

Some foodstuffs mentioned there are not familiar to me: for example, dropwort. But the most intriguing item was the sesame leaves. I had no idea that any part of the plant other than the seeds were eaten. For that matter, I don't know what a sesame plant looks like or where it's most commonly grown (in the U.S., California, no doubt  :biggrin:).

Dropwort is truely a wonderful vegetable, if you can ever get your hands on it give it a try.
It is also known as water celery or minari in Korean and seri in Japanese. It is a common hotpot ingredient and it also often used in making napa cabbage kimchi.

What is called sesame leaves is actually the perilla plant and is actually a misnomer, they are not related to the true sesame. Perilla (called kkaennip in Korean) is similar to the Japanese shiso but almost twice the size.
I have used shiso to make this kimchi and it is really good!

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#6 tissue

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Posted 03 March 2003 - 01:03 PM

I like the radish kimchee, the cubed or whole kind, not the kind in julienned.

#7 torakris

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Posted 06 March 2003 - 04:35 PM

I don't know if I could pick a favorite, but I might have to say either daikon or green onion, though I have made shiso and komatsu-na (a Japanese green similar to spinach) and they are up there as well.
I love the napa cabbage, but have not yet been able to make one as good as my local Korean restaurant! :sad:
I do have a quick version, ready to eat in a couple hours, that is probably my favorite version so far.

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#8 jhlurie

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Posted 06 March 2003 - 05:01 PM

Lettuce/Cabbage , Radish, Green Onion, Cucumber are my favorites. I SEEN some really unusual ones, but I'm kind of a coward. :wink:

I prefer my Kimchi a little bit hotter and a little less on the "fishy" side, although I certainly understand that some amount of that is always necessary.

Edited by jhlurie, 06 March 2003 - 05:03 PM.

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#9 Jinmyo

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Posted 06 March 2003 - 05:53 PM

My two favourites are cubed daikon and Napa cabbage with scallion.

I simply can't believe how good these are. :blink:

I like it fishy and effervescent.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

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#10 torakris

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Posted 12 March 2003 - 03:43 PM

Lat night we just finsihed off the crab kimchi.
These tiny freshwater crabs about the size of a large thumb are kimchi-d whole, claws and all.
They were incredibly sweet and the combination with the spicinesss was incredible.
I may have cut my tongue i na couple places trying to chew the claws but it was worth it! :biggrin:

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#11 Jinmyo

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Posted 13 March 2003 - 08:57 AM

I've just bought a jug of the most beautiful white kimchee. Huge quarters of cabbage, shredded daikon, scallions all fishy and sweet and crunchy. No chiles.

I'm going to have some with some ocean perch (and regular cabbage kimchee and daikon kimchee).
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#12 tissue

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Posted 13 March 2003 - 09:10 AM

Lat night we just finsihed off the crab kimchi.
These tiny freshwater crabs about the size of a large thumb are kimchi-d whole, claws and all.
They were incredibly sweet and the combination with the spicinesss was incredible.
I may have cut my tongue i na couple places trying to chew the claws but it was worth it! :biggrin:

Are these the brown cockroach looking things?

:raz:

#13 torakris

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Posted 13 March 2003 - 04:09 PM

they are normally a blue-ish grey color, though it was hard to tell because of the red sauce. :biggrin:

They are round and look like tiny crabs (pinchers and all), I honestly don't know if I could have eaten them if they resembled cockroaches. :wink: :biggrin:

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#14 tissue

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Posted 14 March 2003 - 11:51 AM

Because I tasted these cockroach looking things one time.
I was assured they were some type of shallow water crustacean.

I only had one; I was so grossed out by it.
But I still hid some in my friend's bibimbap...

#15 ZenFoodist

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Posted 14 March 2003 - 01:19 PM

Here in Flushing, it's kimchi city. I too love the cubed daikon- gakdogi. Whenever I step foot into any of the restaurants where we're regulars the waitress always puts a heaping dish of this crunchy stuff in front of us no matter what's in the pan chan rotation for that evening.

I'm trying to get my fave chef in downtown Flushing to make me a sort of kimchi bokkum bap, but instead of using napa cabbage, the gakdogi. I'd love the crunch against the rice.

Mash-i-da :p

#16 Jinmyo

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Posted 03 April 2003 - 10:15 AM

This might seem gross but really works for me.

Mound of mashed potatoes (with much butter). Slices of smoked beef sausage arranged on the edge of the potatoes. Cold cabbage kimchee.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#17 CathyL

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Posted 03 April 2003 - 10:39 AM

The Korean farmers who sell home-made kimchi at the Union Square greenmarket make one with Jerusalem artichokes - very good, with a more delicate crunch than the radish variety. Their cabbage/chili/scallion version is my favorite, though.

Jin, I think your potato dish sounds scrumptious. I like brown rice with sriracha and cold cabbage kimchi.

#18 Jinmyo

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Posted 03 April 2003 - 10:43 AM

Sunchoke kimchee? Sounds great. There are hundreds of kinds.

Mustard green kimchee is fabulous.

Brown rice (I use Lunberg Farms medium grain along with a Korean sticky short grain) and kimchee is great. Especially with a few grilled shrimp and some slices of steak on top. Or Used for bibimbap.

I was amazed to find that butter (in the mashers) worked so well with kimchee.

I might even try the deep-fried kimchee sandwiches I've seen around lately.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#19 tissue

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Posted 03 April 2003 - 11:11 AM

I like the marinated raw crab (blue crab). Don't know the korean name. Does that count as kimchi?

It's marinated in chili paste and garlic, scallions, vinegar?.

#20 torakris

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Posted 03 April 2003 - 03:14 PM

they all count! :biggrin:
My husband's favorite is the raw octopus kimchi.

Jin, if that recipe was coming from anyone else.................
I might give it a try now :biggrin:

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#21 Jinmyo

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Posted 03 April 2003 - 04:21 PM

Kristin, this was just a snack I would never serve. But it was very tasty.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#22 torakris

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Posted 03 April 2003 - 05:32 PM

Kristin, this was just a snack I would never serve. But it was very tasty.

Jin,
You make mashed potatoes and sausages as a snack? :blink:

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#23 Jinmyo

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Posted 03 April 2003 - 05:45 PM

Hm. By "snack" I mean something I just make for myself and not something I serve for twenty to thirty people.

But, yes. This was a play on the bangers and mash theme.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#24 torakris

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Posted 04 April 2003 - 03:40 PM

Hm. By "snack" I mean something I just make for myself and not something I serve for twenty to thirty people.

But, yes. This was a play on the bangers and mash theme.

Thank you for clarifying that!
I was starting to get an image of you as a very well built woman in the 300lb range! :shock: :biggrin:

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#25 Jinmyo

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Posted 09 April 2003 - 04:36 PM

Har har har. I've just gotten some garlic stem kimchee and some shiso leaf kimchee. Bwhahahaha.


/cough

I love kimchee.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#26 torakris

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Posted 09 April 2003 - 05:38 PM

Har har har. I've just gotten some garlic stem kimchee and some shiso leaf kimchee. Bwhahahaha.


/cough

I love kimchee.

garlic stem kimchi, that sounds great I am going to have to try to make that one.
I ahve made the shiso one before and it was really good (just that and a bowl of gohan........... :wub: ), I am sure it would have been better with the Korean shiso though because it is thicker.

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#27 Jinmyo

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Posted 09 April 2003 - 06:25 PM

Kristin, the differences between the Japanese and Korean versions id similiar ingredients is very interesting.

I agree about the shiso kimchee and gohan. Hard to have room for anything else, it's so good.

The garlic stems are tender, very herbaceous, crunchy. Very nice with grilled saba (mackerel).
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#28 DavidJS

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Posted 10 April 2003 - 11:45 PM

I usually like the cucumber kimchee but most Korean restaurant don't often serve it. So the best place is the Korean grocery market.

#29 Vanessa

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Posted 14 April 2003 - 05:47 AM

Speaking as a kimchi neophyte here: does daikon kimchi always stink? :unsure:

v

#30 Simon Majumdar

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Posted 14 April 2003 - 05:56 AM

can someone tell me if a story I was told on my recent US trip is total B/S or not?

I was in Chicago for a very brief meeting and met with a very elderly man who started the company with whom I am to publish a number of books.

We started talking about Korea as he promised to take me to his favourite place and he had served in Korea during the war and he told me that during and just after the conflict, the US forces were hampered in their attempts to remove all the land mines because every other beep on their metal detector turned out to be a metal cannister of kimchi fermenting in the ground

have no idea if it is true, but a great story to imagine some young soldier sweating as he tried to difuse a pot of pickled cabbage.........

S