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Furikake


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105 replies to this topic

#91 Dianabanana

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Posted 29 March 2008 - 03:51 PM

I've been meaning to make Hiroyuki's magic furikake for ages and finally did this afternoon. It was only a moment's work to make and was quite tasty.

Thanks, Hiroyuki!

#92 Hiroyuki

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Posted 30 March 2008 - 04:56 PM

I've been meaning to make Hiroyuki's magic furikake for ages and finally did this afternoon. It was only a moment's work to make and was quite tasty.

Thanks, Hiroyuki!

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Thank you, Dianabanana! :biggrin: Did you have it with rice? As I said in my foodblog, it's also good on Japanese pizza! Put some furikake, some additional sesame seeds, and cheese on pizza (no tomato sauce). When the pizza is done, sprinkle some bonito flakes (and some soy sauce).

#93 MoGa

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 08:08 AM

I've been meaning to make Hiroyuki's magic furikake for ages and finally did this afternoon. It was only a moment's work to make and was quite tasty.

Thanks, Hiroyuki!

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Thank you, Dianabanana! :biggrin: Did you have it with rice?


I've also made this and can say it's been a big success (I've now made it with mackeral and I've also tried it with canned tuna, which was also delicious).
Perfect for lunch (with rice of course) and as a late night snack. We love it! thank you so much!

---
Alternative use for Yukari Furikake (shiso gohan)
This is the powdered perilla/beafsteak plant leaves - ingredients are usually red shiso, salt, sugar, amino and malic acids.

Add a tablespoon to 2-4 whole pickled beetroots and mash beetroots with fork. Leave for 5-10 minutes and combine beetroot pulp with your choice of - mayonnaise, creme fraiche/sour cream, yoghurt, thick cream (we generally like a combination of mayonnaise and creme fraiche or yoghurt - or just leave out the dairy products entirely). Delicious with new potatoes, salmon and salad.

Ideally, I make this with one or two ume mashed in with the beetroot, but this isn't necessary. I came up with the shiso powder and beetroot combination after running out of ume, and both my parents as well as my husband enjoyed it. It's now a favourite fish and salad dressing.

#94 Hiroyuki

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 04:48 PM

I've been meaning to make Hiroyuki's magic furikake for ages and finally did this afternoon. It was only a moment's work to make and was quite tasty.

Thanks, Hiroyuki!

View Post

Thank you, Dianabanana! :biggrin: Did you have it with rice?


I've also made this and can say it's been a big success (I've now made it with mackeral and I've also tried it with canned tuna, which was also delicious).
Perfect for lunch (with rice of course) and as a late night snack. We love it! thank you so much!

---
Alternative use for Yukari Furikake (shiso gohan)
This is the powdered perilla/beafsteak plant leaves - ingredients are usually red shiso, salt, sugar, amino and malic acids.

Add a tablespoon to 2-4 whole pickled beetroots and mash beetroots with fork. Leave for 5-10 minutes and combine beetroot pulp with your choice of - mayonnaise, creme fraiche/sour cream, yoghurt, thick cream (we generally like a combination of mayonnaise and creme fraiche or yoghurt - or just leave out the dairy products entirely). Delicious with new potatoes, salmon and salad.

Ideally, I make this with one or two ume mashed in with the beetroot, but this isn't necessary. I came up with the shiso powder and beetroot combination after running out of ume, and both my parents as well as my husband enjoyed it. It's now a favourite fish and salad dressing.

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Thank you, MoGa! Do post a photo of your use of Yukari! It's impossible for me to imagine what the whole pickled beetroots and mash beetroots are... :huh:
As for my furikake, do you use mirin or sugar?

#95 MoGa

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 06:02 PM

As for my furikake, do you use mirin or sugar?


Mirin (I always keep a big bottle in the fridge)

I'll try and post a photo in the next couple of weeks - it's a very pretty pink. (I'll PM you when I've posted it).

I made another batch of the mackerel 'magic' furikake today. MrMoGa's lunch tomorrow will be the magic furikake with rice, Saturday's salted cabbage (kabetsu shio zuke - salt, konbu & mirin) and shoyu marinaded garlic cloves (ninniku shoyu zuke - store bought).

#96 v. gautam

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 06:34 PM

MoGa,

Your mentioning a non-traditional substitute in the form of pickled beets, and red perilla reminded me of something that may have a somewhat japanese application. It does not fit in anywhere except salad dressings and I thought I might as well include it here.

I see bags of perilla seed in Korean groceries and wonder what they go into? In the Indian Himalayas, these seeds are toasted just so and ground up as you do sesame in a suribachi. Boiled sliced potatoes are dressed with this paste to which roasted ground sesame may also be added.

From that point on, your taste takes over. In the Himalayan context, crushed garlic, and a thick syrup that is quite sour made by boiling down the very juicy wild lemon, Citrus jambhiri, is added. Finely chopped green chilies, or chillies crushed in the suribachi to release their rind oils may also follow. Salt, of course. Any other alliums you may fancy, e.g. a soupcon of diced onion, but not necessary. The potatoes should be dressed when they are very hot, to absorb the sourness, and then let sit.

#97 MoGa

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 06:10 AM

MoGa,

Your mentioning a non-traditional substitute in the form of pickled beets, and red perilla reminded me of something that may have a somewhat japanese application. It does not fit in anywhere except salad dressings and I thought I might as well include it here.

I see bags of perilla seed in Korean groceries and wonder what they go into? In the Indian Himalayas, these seeds are toasted just so and ground up as you do sesame in a suribachi. Boiled sliced potatoes are dressed with this paste to which roasted ground sesame may also be added.

From that point on, your taste takes over. In the Himalayan context, crushed garlic, and a thick syrup that is quite sour made by boiling down the very juicy wild lemon, Citrus jambhiri, is added. Finely chopped green chilies, or chillies crushed in the suribachi to release their rind oils may also follow. Salt, of course. Any other alliums you may fancy, e.g. a soupcon of diced onion, but not necessary. The potatoes should be dressed when they are very hot, to absorb the sourness, and then let sit.

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I've not seen bags of perilla seed (but you've spurred me to look a lot harder!) in London, but your descriptions sound wonderful - there's obviously lots of room for experimentation.
The furikake I metioned is made from the dried leaf of the perilla (if you ever buy ume boshi plums you can make your own yukari seasoning by drying out and crumbling the red leaves that usually coat the umeboshi).

I don't know how the Koreans use perilla seeds, but in Japan they are often used in pickles.
I believe they are called shisonomi
Posted Image

I've also had them served to me still attached to the stalk, you use your chopsticks to strip them from the stalk and the seeds will season a small bowl of soy sauce
Pictures here: http://hachi.fool.jp...onomi/index.php

I'd love to get hold of some to use in my own pickles. If I do find them, I'll be asking you more questions. Those suggestions you made have really made my mouth water!

#98 MoGa

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Posted 14 April 2008 - 05:27 AM

i testify that this recipe is simple and tasty.  it lives up to its name...  thanks for sharing!

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Thank you for trying my recipe, melonpan. This furikake is one of my favorite breakfast okazu (side dishes). Why don't you modify my recipe to suit your Korean taste and post it here?
I always keep the furikake in the refrigerator:

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I've made Hiroyuki's magic furikake a few times now and heartily recommend it (it's become a refrigerator staple).

Success with this recipe led me to overcome my distaste for canned salmon and try making salmon flakes this way (instead of with fresh salted salmon).

I'm still in the experimental stage, but so far the results have been positive.

I drained 2 x 210g cans of pink salmon and turned the fish out onto a frying pan (no oil) on a moderate/low heat setting. Using a spatula I flaked the fish and stirred it periodically until the flakes dried out a little (5-10 minutes). Then I mixed 4 tablespoons of light soy sauce, 3 tablespoons of mirin* and 2 tablespoons of sake and added this to the fish, stirring quickly to incorporate it. Then I continued stirring until the flakes dried out further (I imagine that the drier the flakes, the longer they will last). The main challenge is allowing the fish to dry out without letting it colour or burn. Finally, I added a dribble of sesame oil and mixed this in before setting aside to cool.
I'm almost sad to report that my husband preferred these salmon flakes to the ones I've made with fresh salmon (he suspects the prolonged soak in brine makes them tastier)... at least it's cheaper this way and we'll never need to buy more jars of pre-made salmon flakes (currently about 6GBP/$12 for 300g in London)

The first thing I did with the resulting canned salmon 'furikake' was to mash a couple of umeboshi plums and mix this with some of the salmon flake furikake - it made delicious onigiri, but the flakes don't clump in the way that bonito shavings do when mixed with ume, so ume-blended salmon flakes make very tasty furikake in their own right.

This morning, I folded some into an omelet. Also very good.

Thank you again, Hiroyuki . I would never have considered the possibility of making this at all if I hadn't tried your recipe first.

----
* I'll try adding another spoon of mirin next time to better approximate the golden 1:1 mirin:soy sauce ratio.

Edited by MoGa, 14 April 2008 - 05:28 AM.


#99 Hiroyuki

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Posted 14 April 2008 - 06:02 PM

Another big thank you to you, MoGa! :smile: :smile:

And, thanks for sharing your great experiments.

Here are some comments on my past experiences:
I have found that my furikake recipe doesn't work for canned tuna. The resulting furikake just doesn't taste good. I prefer simply draining the canned tuna, putting it on top of hot rice, and pouring some soy sauce. A very easy lunch.
My furikake recipe doesn't work for salmon, either. I prefer simply heating and drying unsalted salmon (not canned) in a frying pan with a spatula, with some sake added, and seasoning it very lightly with salt. When I have it with rice, I pour some soy sauce on it for flavoring.

#100 mkayahara

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Posted 08 March 2010 - 07:47 AM

I'm interested in trying Hiroyuki's "magic furikake," but I have a question about the recipe: where it says "3 cans of mackerel," how big are the cans? The only canned mackerel I can get around here is 425g per can, so three of those would make a lot of furikake! Can someone help?
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#101 smallworld

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 05:09 PM

I love canned fish and keep a huge stockpile, so I just went and checked and I have two cans of mackerel. One is 160g and the other is 190g, and I think that's typical. So I think you can go ahead and use your one big can for the recipe, maybe adjusting the seasonings a little.
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#102 Hiroyuki

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 07:08 PM

I'm interested in trying Hiroyuki's "magic furikake," but I have a question about the recipe: where it says "3 cans of mackerel," how big are the cans? The only canned mackerel I can get around here is 425g per can, so three of those would make a lot of furikake! Can someone help?

I can't believe I missed this question of mkayahara!

In Japan, one "saba no mizuni" can contains about 180-200 g simmered mackerel.
(The content has become lower. It was 210 to 220 g years ago, if I remember correctly.)

Here is the most recent post about my magic furikake.

Sorry for a very late reply and many thanks to smallworld for answering first!

#103 mkayahara

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Posted 09 March 2010 - 07:55 PM

Thank you both, smallworld and Hiroyuki! I'm looking forward to making this. Now I just have to go and buy some sesame seeds.
Matthew Kayahara
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#104 heidih

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 12:32 PM

The furikake and popcorn craze has hit Los Angeles in a big way - example Roy Choi's version at A-Frame. Also recently some co-workers were swooning over a bowl of  Hurricane popcorn of which I got not a single kernel. In an attempt to join the party I purchased this Ebi Fumi Furikake and am set to experiment.

 

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#105 annabelle

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 01:54 PM

I love furikake, but have only eaten it on rice.  I had a small container of it in my lunch box (a Mrs. Bento) one day when I was unpacking it to wash it and my husband grabbed it.  "What's THIS!?" he demanded.  I about laughed myself silly after he told me he thought it was weed.



#106 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 02:49 PM

The Furikake you need to find is the Kawaii Furikake that has tiny dried fishcakes that have Anime characters in it...

 

See the following

 

http://zakkalife.blo...u-furikake.html

Pikatchu Fishcakes

 

http://www.littlejap...ia-onigiri.html

Pink Flower Fishcakes

 

http://sonomabento.b...d-giveaway.html

Pokemon fishcake

 

http://www.amazon.co...e/dp/B0093M0XEE

Winnie the Pooh Ochazuke

 

 

 

http://flickrhivemin...earch_type=Tags

^^This page shows Snoopy furikake and more


Edited by GlorifiedRice, 07 April 2013 - 02:50 PM.

Wawa Sizzli FTW!