Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Making mayonnaise

Condiments

  • Please log in to reply
90 replies to this topic

#61 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,338 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 27 June 2010 - 06:56 PM

I'm so glad we're back discussing mayonnaise! This is the perfect time to have your best homemade mayonnaise recipe at the ready. It's perfect for slathering, (literally), on hot dog and hamburger buns, turning into lobster salad and into a lobster club sandwich. It's delicious in all manner of Summer salads-tuna, chicken, egg, potato and mixed into your favorite deviled egg recipe.

I'm quite fond of my mayonnaise recipe, but I'm also particular about the oil. Some may not agree with me, but for my tastes I only use extra-virgin Greek olive oil when I make mayonnaise. I prefer what I find is the spicy, herbal and peppery taste of Greek olive oil. Some say it's a bit overpowering, almost metallic tasting for mayonnaise, but I like the bold taste of Greek olive oil--and it gives the mayonnaise a rich, deep yellow color.

I use a Cusinart food processor and it makes perfect mayonnaise every time. Here is my basic recipe:
2 eggs
1 tsp. salt
1 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
2 tsp. Dijon mustard
1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
Fresh ground black pepper
1 1/2 cups Greek olive oil

Pulse the eggs, salt, lemon juice, mustard, cayenne and black pepper until combined. Then slowly start to add the olive oil in a steady stream until the mayonnaise starts to emulsify and thicken. You may not need to use the full 1 1/2 cups of olive oil. Refrigerate the mayonnaise until ready to use.

As you can see, homemade mayonnaise is not your "Best Foods" white, creamy, smooth out of the Supermarket deluxe. It is thick. It is yellow. It is delicious.
Mayonnaise and Potato Salad 063.JPG

#62 nickrey

nickrey
  • society donor
  • 2,229 posts
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 27 June 2010 - 08:58 PM

If money is no object, you could do what Heston Blumenthal reported in his Big Fat Duck cookbook.

On visiting Peter Barham and discussing mayonnaise, Peter pulled out ultrasound gun and applied it to oil and egg in a beaker. The vibrations broke up the oil perfectly into little droplets creating mayonnaise in a flash.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog


#63 nakji

nakji
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,659 posts
  • Location:Shanghai

Posted 28 June 2010 - 12:59 AM

On visiting Peter Barham and discussing mayonnaise, Peter pulled out ultrasound gun and applied it to oil and egg in a beaker. The vibrations broke up the oil perfectly into little droplets creating mayonnaise in a flash.


Cool.

I'm so glad we're back discussing mayonnaise! This is the perfect time to have your best homemade mayonnaise recipe at the ready. It's perfect for slathering, (literally), on hot dog and hamburger buns, turning into lobster salad and into a lobster club sandwich. It's delicious in all manner of Summer salads-tuna, chicken, egg, potato and mixed into your favorite deviled egg recipe.


David, what do you use yours for?

#64 Pam Brunning

Pam Brunning
  • participating member
  • 259 posts

Posted 28 June 2010 - 01:44 AM

Just put the eggs out to warm up to make a batch of our favourite mayonnaise for salads etc. Six eggs 2 litres sunflower oil wine vinegar salt and fresh ground pepper. I make it in a Robot Coupe it lasts us abour two weeks this time of year. We find olive oil much too strong for general use it overpowers a lot of flavours. :biggrin:
Pam Brunning Editor Food & Wine, the Journal of the European & African Region of the International Wine & Food Society
My link

#65 adey73

adey73
  • participating member
  • 604 posts
  • Location:Moscow, Russia

Posted 28 June 2010 - 09:15 AM

Has anyone ever successfully recreated Kewpie?

(it gets more expense by the day in the UK)
“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

#66 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,338 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 28 June 2010 - 08:07 PM

I originally created my recipe for mayonnaise to work it into my potato salad recipe. You can see my rendition of potato salad here, but I also use it as a spread for sandwiches, in deviled eggs and a spread on hamburger buns.

#67 bmwrtmike

bmwrtmike
  • participating member
  • 9 posts
  • Location:Puyallup, Wa.

Posted 29 June 2010 - 05:53 AM

I am interested to know if someone has made mayo using just lecithin and no eggs to make the emulsion. I know some people that don't do eggs, and want to try this. Any ideas on where to start? and would I need something else, maybe mustard? Also would I use the lecithin granules or the liquid? this would also make it safer no?

Thanks,
Mike

Edited by bmwrtmike, 29 June 2010 - 05:54 AM.


#68 nakji

nakji
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,659 posts
  • Location:Shanghai

Posted 29 June 2010 - 07:46 AM

Has anyone ever successfully recreated Kewpie?

(it gets more expense by the day in the UK)


Rice vinegar and msg? Aren't those the secret ingredients?

#69 adey73

adey73
  • participating member
  • 604 posts
  • Location:Moscow, Russia

Posted 29 June 2010 - 07:55 AM

Is Soya oil used instead of EVOO?
“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

#70 ChickenStu

ChickenStu
  • participating member
  • 142 posts

Posted 29 June 2010 - 08:06 AM

Anyone else find mayo made with only olive oil to be really bitter?

#71 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,382 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 29 June 2010 - 08:32 AM

Anyone else find mayo made with only olive oil to be really bitter?

Don't really find it bitter - but there is something very unappealing about it.

When I make my mayo like caesar salad dressing - I use a couple of cups of sunflower oil and add about 1/2 a cup of olive oil to get a nice flavour.

#72 ChickenStu

ChickenStu
  • participating member
  • 142 posts

Posted 29 June 2010 - 10:10 AM

How long does everyone keep their mayo before tossing it?

Ive always just done a week...

#73 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,300 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 29 June 2010 - 11:58 AM

Anyone else find mayo made with only olive oil to be really bitter?



I never use EVOO - I use the more refined regular olive oil that I buy at my local middle eastern market in a big tin. It has a blander flavor than EVOO.

I also sometimes use grapeseed oil and I also buy that at the middle eastern market because it is available in larger containers and is much cheaper than at the regular markets.
This oil also has a neutral flavor and makes an excellent mayonnaise.

I am sticking to my original advice to have everything chilled - it doesn't have to be super cold but I have much better results (especially in the summer) with this method, which I have been using all my life.

If you want to have the ingredients at room temp (as long as it isn't too warm) by all means use that method if it works well for you.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#74 Porthos

Porthos
  • participating member
  • 1,116 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 29 June 2010 - 01:43 PM

Mrs P and I both prefer corn oil. We have never chilled the ingredients first. I can make it by hand but much prefer using the whip attachment on my Kitchenaid mixer. Egg yoke, white vinegar, regular yellow mustard, salt and corn oil. It's worked for us for over 30 years.

Porthos Potwatcher
The Unrelenting Carnivore
"If every pork chop was perfect, we wouldn't have hot dogs." (source unknown)
Customer to clerk in a clothing store, "Do you have these in a size for people who actually eat?"


#75 HowardLi

HowardLi
  • participating member
  • 416 posts

Posted 04 July 2010 - 02:34 AM

Personally, I despise the taste of corn oil in something that isn't especially strongly flavoured.

I love making it with a stick blender - it literally takes less than a minute to clean afterwards, if some soapy water is available.

Edited by HowardLi, 04 July 2010 - 02:34 AM.


#76 Pam Brunning

Pam Brunning
  • participating member
  • 259 posts

Posted 04 July 2010 - 06:21 AM

This is why I like sunflower oil and whole eggs. It makes a very mild mayonnaise that does not mask the flavour of whatever you are using it with and is great as a base for all sorts of sauces. I use it to thin out pesto, add herbs and spice flavourings, there are no end of things you can do with it. I make a large batch and it lasts for 2 or 3 weeks. I don't like corn oil flavour either and, much as I love eggs, I don't like egg yolk mayonnaise because you can taste the yolks. :sad:
Pam Brunning Editor Food & Wine, the Journal of the European & African Region of the International Wine & Food Society
My link

#77 gfweb

gfweb
  • participating member
  • 3,671 posts

Posted 25 May 2012 - 09:11 PM

So what mayo recipes do we all use?

#78 Pierogi

Pierogi
  • participating member
  • 1,476 posts
  • Location:Long Beach, CA

Posted 25 May 2012 - 09:55 PM

So what mayo recipes do we all use?

The one in Bittman's "How to Cook Everything". I think (and I'm winging it from memory), it's 1 egg, 2T lemon juice, some dry mustard and cayenne, S&P, and a cup of oil. I use 50/50 canola/light EVOO, and I toss in 1-2 cloves of garlic, depending upon how big they are. I find straight EVOO too heavy, and straight canola too meh. I put the egg, juice, spices and garlic in the bowl of a KA mini-processor, then drizzle in the oil while the processor's running. I usually end up adding the rest of the juice from the lemon (probably about another tablespoon-ful) after the emulsion's formed. I found that if I add the whole amount of juice up front, at least for me, the emulsion won't form. I also can't get it to work in my full-size Cuisinart processor. The mini works much better.

It is absolutely sublime on fresh artichokes.......and on my fingers when I dip them in the bowl..... :wink:
--Roberta--
"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley
Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

#79 Pierogi

Pierogi
  • participating member
  • 1,476 posts
  • Location:Long Beach, CA

Posted 26 May 2012 - 12:23 AM

And lookie, an article on the NY Times website today by Melissa Clark about....wait for it....homemade mayo ! I especially like some of the variations she offers (bacon mayo anyone?).

http://www.nytimes.c...naise.html?hpw
--Roberta--
"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley
Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

#80 Shalmanese

Shalmanese
  • participating member
  • 3,442 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 26 May 2012 - 11:59 AM

Has anyone tried making milk mayonaise? It seems like an interesting variation.
PS: I am a guy.

#81 LindaK

LindaK
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,889 posts
  • Location:Boston, MA

Posted 27 May 2012 - 06:40 AM

Has anyone tried making milk mayonaise? It seems like an interesting variation.

I've made it and didn't like it at all. Without flavor additions, it just tasted like whipped oil. Adding other ingredients--I tried both a curry and fresh herbs--made it more palatable but not like something I actually wanted to eat.

I had high hopes because in general I like David Leite's recipes. But if I'm going to splurge on calories, this is not how I'd do it.


 


#82 Lisa Shock

Lisa Shock
  • society donor
  • 2,093 posts
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ

Posted 27 May 2012 - 02:38 PM

So what mayo recipes do we all use?

I posted some on my attempted blog: lusciousrepast.com

#83 annabelle

annabelle
  • participating member
  • 1,956 posts
  • Location:Grand Lake o' the Cherokees, Oklahoma

Posted 27 May 2012 - 03:57 PM

I use Julia Child's mayonnaise recipe. I can make it in the food processor since my blender died.

#84 janeer

janeer
  • participating member
  • 1,212 posts

Posted 27 May 2012 - 04:40 PM

Here is how I make it.

#85 gfweb

gfweb
  • participating member
  • 3,671 posts

Posted 27 May 2012 - 05:49 PM

2 yolks, 1.5 cup peanut oil, 1 tsp dijon, 1tbsp vinegar, salt... in a blender

#86 Ozcook

Ozcook
  • participating member
  • 38 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia

Posted 10 March 2013 - 04:12 PM

Has anyone tried making milk mayonaise? It seems like an interesting variation.

 

I regularly make this mayo as it is safer for kids lunchboxes than egg mayo. It is made with a stick blender.

 

Add to the blender container (the tall one that came with the stick blender):

80ml milk

1 tsp Dijon

1/4 tsp salt

1/8 tsp sugar

1 tsp lemon/lime juice

 

(I usually omit the small clove garlic but if I add it I pre-cook it in the microwave first to get rid of the raw taste)

 

Blend until very smooth on low speed.

 

Stop the blender. Add your 180 mls of oil. I usually add 120 ml of light olive oil and 60 ml of regular.

 

The oil will float on top of the milk mixture. With the stick blender standing on the bottom of the container, start blending on low speed. After about 15-20 seconds, slowly raise the blender towards the surface. The oil will be incorporated. If necessary dunk the stick blender a couple of times. You should now have smooth creamy mayo. :smile:

 

The strength of flavour is entirely up to the maker. You can add herbs, EVOO, whatever.



#87 Mjx

Mjx

    Senior Host

  • host
  • 6,203 posts

Posted 11 March 2013 - 01:04 AM


I regularly make this mayo as it is safer for kids lunchboxes than egg mayo. It is made with a stick blender.

 

. . . .

 

Just curious; are pasteurized eggs (yolks, whites, whole) just a Danish thing?

 

I've never thought to actively look for these when I've been in shops in various countries, but in Denmark, pretty much any time raw eggs are required, most people reach for pasteurized, which are found in every supermarket.

 

By the way, I'm trying to figure out how to make a tiny, one or two serving batch of mayonnaise. Anyone pull this off?


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Senior Host, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org


#88 Ozcook

Ozcook
  • participating member
  • 38 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia

Posted 11 March 2013 - 03:06 AM

By the way, I'm trying to figure out how to make a tiny, one or two serving batch of mayonnaise. Anyone pull this off?

 

270 mls is as low as I have tried. Whatever isn't used goes into the refrigerator and is good for at least 5 days (but it is usually consumed before then).

 

BTW, I have never seen pasteurized eggs in a supermarket in Australia, (if you mean not powdered, not frozen).


Edited by Ozcook, 11 March 2013 - 03:08 AM.


#89 tim

tim
  • participating member
  • 828 posts

Posted 11 March 2013 - 06:51 AM

A tiny batch of mayo requires only a tiny blender.

 

It is easy to pasteurize eggs at home.



#90 mm84321

mm84321
  • participating member
  • 740 posts

Posted 11 March 2013 - 11:40 AM

You can also make mayonnaise with a whisk. Works quite well with small or large quantities. 







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Condiments