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The Daiquiri


Danne
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Wow, that was a while ago.  Glad you liked it!  Last night was a Cana Brava 8:2:1 daiquiri for me.  It was just perfect.

 

I find W&N easy enough to use up.  It's the Barbancourt I find hard to like in drinks.

How do you like to use the W&N?

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How do you like to use the W&N?

 

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/25600-mai-tai-recipes/?p=1975555

 

 

...enjoying one at the moment.  I'm pretty sure I use W&N in other beverages but offhand I can't remember what.  Anyhow the bottles of W&N tend to go by pretty fast, no problem.  Sadly one died tonight.

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Thanks, FP, I made a D.W.B. tonight. Exactly by the recipe. It's OK, but nothing for me to get excited about. For one thing it is too sweet for a daiquiri, and for the La Favorite to shine through. (I confess I did not wash the shaker after my zombie, but I doubt that matters much.)

 

For what it's worth I think arrack works better with lemon than with lime, and the best vehicle I've found for arrack is Mississippi punch. How I love Mississippi punch! Even though the Mississippi punch recipe has a tad more than the two ounces of spirit some find fashionable.

 

Sorry it did not do it for you.  You know, you can always adjust the sweetness level to your taste. What I found exciting was the combination of the funk from the rhum agricole and the batavia arrack. It's not something I had experienced before.

 

Here is last night's Daiquiri 10:3:2 with Damoiseau rhum agricole from Guadeloupe.

 

14789328750_3d4378d733_z.jpg

 

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Sadly I guess I am hidebound and too old to change.  My daiquiri is a fairly neutral rum (current favorite is Cana Brava) 8:2:1. No more, no less.

 

But I do like funk.  I credit you, FP, more than anyone for turning me on to the joys of agricole.  That being said my beverage tonight (first beverage tonight?) is Mississippi punch:

 

1 wineglass Pierre Ferrand 1840

1/2 wineglass S&C

1 Tablespoon arrack

juice of half a lemon

2 teaspoons sugar

 

 

Fresh mint.  How could one want more than this?

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  • 3 weeks later...

I just finished the Daiquiri chapter of Potions of the Caribbean. Constante Ribalaigua was truly a god of rum, lime, and sugar. Beachbum Berry, being the researcher he is, has given us the definitive versions of the Floridita Daiquiris, including the ones as drunk by Hemingway, and the one whose recipe Constante altered to make them more palatable to the general public as Berry notes that Hemingway's own recipes were those of a pure alcoholic and aren't very tasty (the published Floridita recipe for a Papa Doble is just a Daiquiri no. 3 without sugar, but that's not what Hemingway received).

 

Also of interest is that the Daiquiri no. 4 (no grapefruit but with maraschino) was known as the "Hemingway Daiquiri" when made sugarless and to his proportions, while the no. 3, with grapefruit and maraschino (again sugarless and to EH's specific ratios), was known as the "E. Hemingway Special" or "Papa Doble". That clarifies a lot of misconceptions - most people from my experience (myself included) think a Papa Doble and a Hemingway Daiquiri are the same, or that the former is a double version of the latter. Now we know they're two different things.

 

I have to say, I agree with Berry in that the drinks as made for Hemingway himself sound rather awful, but Berry's detailed and accurate renditions of the the canonical Floridita daiquiris, down to the type of ice, is really fantastic. I *almost* can't wait for it to get bloody hot again....except I'll never again call what I make a Hemingway or a Papa Doble, but rather a Daiquiri a La Florida, numeros Uno, Dos, Tres, o Cuatro.

Edited by Hassouni (log)
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With the heat wave in San Diego, a Daiquiri was a must-have last night. Clement Canne Bleue (2011) is a single varietal rhum agricole, made from a variety of sugar cane from Barbados that has a violet-greyish tinge. I brought it back from a trip to Paris a while back, and had not made a Daiquiri with it yet, just a Ti Punch.

On its own, in terms of intensity, it's on par with Neisson but less powerful than La Favorite. It makes a wonderfully aromatic Daiquiri, very nuanced and elegant.

 

15250747391_d138b2599c_z.jpg
 

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Kindred says:

2 oz Light rum

3/4 oz Lime juice

1/2 oz Maraschino Liqueur

1/2 oz Grapefruit juice

1 sli Lime (as garnish)

Shake, strain, straight up, coupe, garnish.

Sorry, I'd give you the link but it's too much like hard work on the phone.

Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

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The original was made with a Cuban, molasses-based rum (Bacardi Carta Blanca). No reason why an agricole can't be lovely in this drink, however. Follow your bliss.

 

The "Hemingway" was a La Floridita Daiquiri No. 3 (frappe ice, Maraschino, grapefruit) modified to accommodate the old man's diabetes (no sugar) and alcoholism (double the rum). It's also known as a Papa Doble. 

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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The "Hemingway" was a La Floridita Daiquiri No. 3 (frappe ice, Maraschino, grapefruit) modified to accommodate the old man's diabetes (no sugar) and alcoholism (double the rum). It's also known as a Papa Doble. 

 

 

Also of interest is that the Daiquiri no. 4 (no grapefruit but with maraschino) was known as the "Hemingway Daiquiri" when made sugarless and to his proportions, while the no. 3, with grapefruit and maraschino (again sugarless and to EH's specific ratios), was known as the "E. Hemingway Special" or "Papa Doble". That clarifies a lot of misconceptions - most people from my experience (myself included) think a Papa Doble and a Hemingway Daiquiri are the same, or that the former is a double version of the latter. Now we know they're two different things.

 

Can we try to keep things straight for 2 weeks or at least one thread page?

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True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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I just meant that what most people call a Hemingway Daq these days (Maraschino, grapefruit , Daq trinity) is really a Papa Doble/No. 3. Hassouni's right that the Papa Doble and the HemiDaq are historically distinct.

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Can we try to keep things straight for 2 weeks or at least one thread page?

 

 

I have the authority of the Bum. And I know for a fact Rafa is consulting the same recipes for his Power Daiquiris  :laugh:

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  • 2 months later...
  • 1 month later...

I had not tasted a daiquiri in a while, but I have a lot of seldom used rum and a lot of limes.  These were Embury's ratio, with Difford's suggestion of shaking with the lime peel:

 

 

DaiquiriBrugal01182015.jpg

 

 

DaiquiriFlorDeCana01182015.jpg

 

 

I enjoyed them both.  My only complaint is they warmed up a bit while waiting for the pictures.  And I apologize for the hand held iPad photographs in front of the computer.

 

Now I suppose I could post the same pictures in the dinner thread.

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  • 3 months later...

Speaking of Denizen Merchant's Reserve, it was really great in the Daiquiri variation called Captain's Blood (named after the classic movie with Errol Flynn). Rum, lime juice, simple, Angostura bitters

 

 

17171324122_dd793a483f_z.jpg

 

Tasteful and balanced; gone in no time.

Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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  • 1 month later...

Experimenting with large (2x2) ice cubes in the Dave Arnold and Death & Co styles

 

DA: 1 large cube, 2 small cubes

 

D&Co: 2 large cubes

 

same recipe:

 

2 oz Havana Club Añejo 3 Años

fat 1/2 oz lime

1/4 oz 2:1 white SS

 

the DA recipe is more balanced and more concentrated tasting (and, therefore, AWESOME). The D&Co technique tastes more diluted and a bit out of balance.

 

I'll repeat the tests on a less hard-to-get rum...

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the DA recipe is more balanced and more concentrated tasting (and, therefore, AWESOME). The D&Co technique tastes more diluted and a bit out of balance.

 

That's interesting, I know DA recommends doing two smaller cubes for improved texture but it seems counterintuitive that the two large cube approach would taste more diluted. I'm sure someone smarter than I am can explain it. Guess I'll just have to make some daiquiris and see for myself, in the name of science of course.

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