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The Daiquiri


Danne
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  • 2 weeks later...

A bloody Daiquiri, why not. Benjamin Barker Daiquiri by Brian Miller with aged rum (El Dorado 8), lime juice, Campari, demerara syrup, absinthe (St. George). Pretty well done because the Campari blends harmoniously and does not become obvious until the end. A good option for an aged rum Daiquiri with a slightly bitter finish.

 

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Adding fire to the debate once again:

 

I made a La Favorite Difford's Daiquiri, which I might just call an Elise Daiquiri.

 

60ml rum

18ml lime*

12ml 2:1 white SS*

Shaken over crushed ice and finely strained

 

*ml measurements estimated using my OXO jigger, which has mls marked by the 5

 

It just doesn't do it for me, unfortunately. It's not bad of course, but the Difford's ratio really just doesn't provide the sting that a Daiquiri should have, and there's something about agricole rum that just doesn't work in the drink. It's the same with other cane juice rums I've tried too. They're great for other purposes, but probably not for this. 

 

As I've said on my blog, a daiquiri should be like alcoholic liquid nitrogen, and to me that means a lighter rum and a higher ratio of lime to sugar.

 

PS. What the fuck do Diffords know, they recommend Barfcardi!

Edited by Hassouni (log)
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Just like to quote Embury about his 3:1-ish simple syrup. Making a 8:2:1 Daiquiri with his recommendation below in mind will make us a quite sweet drink. In which case a tend to prefer my 8:2:1 with a 2:1 simple syrup.

 

"The object in determining the ratio of sugar and water is to make the syrup as heavy as possible without getting later crystallization. I have found that a mixture of about 3 cups of sugar to each cup of water yields a very satisfactory syrup. Add the sugar to cold water in a saucepan, heat it, and allow it to boil vigorously for a few minutes. " - David Embury, The Fine Arts of Mixing Drinks

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keep in mind cups of sugar do not equal cups of water. I do 2:1 by weight, which is a bit more than 2 cups of sugar per cup of water. my 8:2:1 is not sweet.

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Adding fire to the debate once again:

 

I made a La Favorite Difford's Daiquiri, which I might just call an Elise Daiquiri.

 

60ml rum

18ml lime*

12ml 2:1 white SS*

Shaken over crushed ice and finely strained

 

*ml measurements estimated using my OXO jigger, which has mls marked by the 5

 

It just doesn't do it for me, unfortunately. It's not bad of course, but the Difford's ratio really just doesn't provide the sting that a Daiquiri should have, and there's something about agricole rum that just doesn't work in the drink. It's the same with other cane juice rums I've tried too. They're great for other purposes, but probably not for this. 

 

As I've said on my blog, a daiquiri should be like alcoholic liquid nitrogen, and to me that means a lighter rum and a higher ratio of lime to sugar.

 

Well, Chris, what can I say... You broke my heart but I am fine now, I had the (long) weekend to recover.

 

I agree that a Daiquiri with rhum agricole is a different experience. However, since I tried my first, I've been hooked and all others seem to pale in comparison. There is something amazing about the funkiness of the rhum paired with the lime that just clicks, and it's more approachable than a Ti Punch. I do also like Daiquiris with lighter/more subtle rums, but if I had to choose just one it would be the agricole version without a doubt.

 

At least you gave it a shot!

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That kind of flavor works GREAT in a caipirinha (that new cachaça I got really reminds me of La Favorite) but something about the shaking and the serving up and all that just doesn't work for me  :huh:

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Hemingway daiquiri with white grapefruit left over from my zombie:

 

2 oz La Favorite

3/4 oz Maraschino

1 oz fresh and lovely lime juice

1/4 oz reserved fresh white grapefruit juice, more or less

 

 

Maybe not quite traditional but I think Hemingway would be pleased.  I sure was.

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Here is a 10:3:2 daiquiri with La Favorite from this weekend. No surprise here, I am still a huge fan. As a side benefit, the rhum starts releasing its fragrance as soon as you open the bottle, and perfumes the whole room by the time the drink is ready.

 

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The new head bartender at my establishment made me his favorite Daiquiri two nights ago—1 oz each of Banks 5 Island and a rich older rum (he used Diplomatico) with 3/4 oz lime juice and 1/2 oz 1:1 simple. Delicious, balanced, and richly flavored, with an almost orgeat-y note from the rum blend. Not as crisp or refreshing as some of my favorite Daiquiris, but an excellent drink in its own right. 

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Yep. It's my standard ratio for guests at the bar. The added richness and heavier body came from the Diplomatico (Banks 5 on its own is flavorful but dry). 

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I was reading the chapter on citrus in Morgenthaler's book, saw the photo of the Daiquiri No. 3 (aka Hemingway Daiquiri), and had to have one immediately. I used his ratios.

First with Plantation 3 Stars; just the rich touch of grassy sugar cane. Then with El Dorado 3 for a richer version.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks, FP, I made a D.W.B. tonight.  Exactly by the recipe.  It's OK, but nothing for me to get excited about.  For one thing it is too sweet for a daiquiri, and for the La Favorite to shine through.  (I confess I did not wash the shaker after my zombie, but I doubt that matters much.)

 

For what it's worth I think arrack works better with lemon than with lime, and the best vehicle I've found for arrack is Mississippi punch.  How I love Mississippi punch!  Even though the Mississippi punch recipe has a tad more than the two ounces of spirit some find fashionable.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Good results tonight.  I thought about trying 2:1:1, but I chickened out.  Here is what I'm having:

 

1 1/2 oz Barbancourt 5 star

1/2 oz Wray & Nephew Overproof

1 oz lime juice

3/4 oz syrup

 

 

Slightly too sweet, but sweet in a good way, not cloying.  I think this recipe with 1/2 oz syrup would be nice.  And the rums, at least in the current proportion, work well.  Though as much as I like it, I can't see drinking more than one because of all the sugar.

 

 

I just tried this with 1/2 oz simple syrup and I quite liked it. I may have found a good way to use up my W&N (which I'm not loving in any other drink).

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