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Danne

The Daiquiri

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That's interesting, I know DA recommends doing two smaller cubes for improved texture but it seems counterintuitive that the two large cube approach would taste more diluted. I'm sure someone smarter than I am can explain it. Guess I'll just have to make some daiquiris and see for myself, in the name of science of course.

 

More surface area? I'm not sure. The strange thing is neither seemed colder than the other. If one really was more diluted, it should at least be colder.

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More surface area? I'm not sure. The strange thing is neither seemed colder than the other. If one really was more diluted, it should at least be colder.

 

That could be, I have never measured if the all the exposed sides of two small cubes exceeds the surface area of the large cube. Were both sets of cubes roughly tempered the same? I find when I use large cubes that are still too cold I get more ice shards than I do from using smaller cubes. That's my biggest issue with the two large cube method, I feel I have to wait a decent amount of time before I have ice that won't shatter.

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Not sure, I wasn't overwhelmingly scientific about it

Which drink did you try second? ;-) A friend of mine told me she was working on perfecting a cocktail's proportions. Every night she'd make it one way, then alter one thing and find the second was better than the first. Then she'd start with that recipe the next night, with another alteration that made it even better. She assumed she was incrementally working her way to the perfect drink, but at some point she realized she merely enjoyed the second drink more every time because she was tipsy.


Edited by Craig E (log)
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DA's was first, D&Co was second, so there goes that theory! For now I'm sticking to a shaker full of normal ice.

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A friend gave me some fresh passion fruits and I was looking for something that could do them justice. I found a recipe for a Daiquiri variation with fresh passion fruit juice that I thought would be nice to try. 

 

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Golden Prestige (Nicolas Michel via Gaz Regan) with Bacardi Superior rum (Plantation 3 Stars white rum), fresh passion fruit juice, lime juice, Monin gomme syrup (Small Hand Foods), orange blossom water, saffron. I used 1/2 barspoon of orange blossom water per cocktail which was plenty, and I reduced the amount of gomme a bit.

 
It is very refined and delicate. It's floral, refreshing and light, but then the saffron gives it an earthiness that anchors it. It's complex and the taste keeps changing with every sip, so you feel like going for another one immediately after the first one. 
cleardot.gif

 

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Made a wicked Daiquiri for my assistants and me at the Green Zone last week:

 

1.5 oz Wray & Nephew

.75 oz lime

scant .5 oz 2:1 white simple syrup (maybe .33 oz?)

 

Crazy good. 

 

Also, a local bar, McLellan's Retreat, hosted a Sasha Petraske memorial Daiquiri hour on Monday night, using Chairman's Reserve white rum - it worked VERY well.

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I love Owney's rum. I wish we could get it in San Diego!

 

It's an excellent product. Makes a great Daiquiri. 

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I'll second that, it's just about the only American made white rum I've tried that has good "Cuban cocktail" potential

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a good option a bartender told me :

50ml plantation 3 stars (or Havana 3)
10ml W&N
25ml lime juice
2 barspoon of sugar

 

I also have a question.

Why a daiquiri is the only sour which balance is so hard to get? There is a lot of ratios for this cocktail whereas a whiskey sour or a gimlet don't create so much debate.

What is so special about this cocktail?

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On 12/11/2015 at 11:40 AM, ananth said:

a good option a bartender told me :

50ml plantation 3 stars (or Havana 3)
10ml W&N
25ml lime juice
2 barspoon of sugar

 

I also have a question.

Why a daiquiri is the only sour which balance is so hard to get? There is a lot of ratios for this cocktail whereas a whiskey sour or a gimlet don't create so much debate.

What is so special about this cocktail?

The ones that give me trouble are the Jack Rose and the Scofflaw (perhaps technically not a sour since it has vermouth in it, but it works like one).  If you are having difficulty, you might want to begin with David Embury's 8:2:1 ratio and go from there.  You'll get a drier, slightly tart drink in which you can really taste the spirit.  Every time I have difficulty with a sour, I find out that it's not because I had too much of either sweet or sour, but because there is too much of both.  Once you take them both down a bit, the flavor of the spirit shines through.

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I think it's easier to balance things with a sugar syrup compared to neat sugar, which may not dissolve completely when you make the drink....

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hey, thanks to both of you for your answer.

I got misunderstood however. I do succeed to find a satisfying balance, the recipe I stated in my previous post is an example. I also like Difford's 10:3:2 with white rum.
I did not try the Embury's 8:2:1 yet I have to admit, which is reserved for aged rum I understand.

My question was especially on the constant debate this drink cause on its balance (contrary to another sour). Maybe is it because of the interaction between rum (which is sugar based) and... well sugar?

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I think it's a matter of personal taste. Also since it's such a simple drink, if you don't get the balance right it's immediately noticeable.

 

Here is a Daiquiri no. 3 from a few nights ago (Constantino Ribalaigua Vert, ratios by Jeff Morgenthaler) with Damoiseau rhum agricole, lime juice, oro blanco grapefruit juice, maraschino liqueur, simple syrup. Well, that one didn't work so well with the Damoiseau. It enhanced its glycerin-like notes. It wasn't horrible by any means, but that rum wasn't the best fit for this drink. (It was better with Plantation 3 Stars for example)

 

Daiquiri no. 3 with Damoiseau rhum agricole, lime juice, oro blanco grapefruit juice, maraschino liqueur, simpke syrup #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #daiquiri #rum #rhumagricole

 

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I made a Daisy de Santiago (Charles H Baker via Bartender's Choice app) with Plantation 3 Stars rum, lime, simple syrup, green Chartreuse. It's supposed to be yellow Chartreuse but it was delicious with the green!  It's like a Daiquiri Naturale with a touch of Chartreuse (I skip the club soda).

 

Daisy de Santiago (Charles H Baker) with Plantation 3 Stars rum, lime, simple syrup, green Chartreuse (oops, should have been yellow - tasty nonetheless!) #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #daiquiri #rum #chartreuse

 

Here is a previous version I made with aged agricole (Clement VSOP) and yellow Chartreuse.

 

Daisy de Santiago (Charles H Baker Jr) with Clement VSOP rhum agricole, lime juice, yellow Chartreuse, simple syrup

 

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