Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Kerry Beal

Cooking with "Chocolates and Confections" by Peter Greweling (Part 1)

Recommended Posts

How does it taste?

It had a very subtle taste, you might not even know it was pear if not told. I would probably add more puree next time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My experience is that a tempered chocolate sets up much faster than an untemepered chocolate in the same recipe--I've sometimes heated a batch too much and had to wait 2-3 days before the consistency settled to the firmness I'd expected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm making the Dark and Stormies. I made the ganache this morning with tempered white chocolate at 30 degrees and it seems to be quite firm already. I'll let you know if it is firm enough to be sliced tomorrow.

I'm not sure if I care for the taste, however, I suspect that the flavour will be entirely different once it is dipped in dark chocolate. It is interesting that with ginger and dark rum in it, it tastes kind of minty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have made those for Mother's day , I really love the flavor .The ganache stayed soft but could be cut with no problem.

I have followed his tecnique for slabbed and piped ganache even with my own recipes and I have been very pleased with the results.My slabbed ganache is always soft and firm so easy to cut , but the texture is perfect.I think following his directions is crucial for the result.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dark and Stormies are a success. Excellent flavour, texture is wonderful.

gallery_34671_3115_15847.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dark and Stormies are a success.  Excellent flavour, texture is wonderful. 

gallery_34671_3115_15847.jpg

kerry,

glad to hear it. I was looking at that recipe as well. Did you use the Bermudan rum or something else?

Luis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dark and Stormies are a success.  Excellent flavour, texture is wonderful. 

gallery_34671_3115_15847.jpg

kerry,

glad to hear it. I was looking at that recipe as well. Did you use the Bermudan rum or something else?

Luis

I used my favorite rum in the world Barbados Cockspur VSOR.

That's got me thinking that the next center I try should be to imitate the drink I love in Barbados which is any combination of fruit juices, grenadine and the Cockspur rum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dark and Stormies are a success.  Excellent flavour, texture is wonderful. 

gallery_34671_3115_15847.jpg

kerry,

glad to hear it. I was looking at that recipe as well. Did you use the Bermudan rum or something else?

Luis

I used my favorite rum in the world Barbados Cockspur VSOR.

That's got me thinking that the next center I try should be to imitate the drink I love in Barbados which is any combination of fruit juices, grenadine and the Cockspur rum.

That would be intersting. keep us posted.

Luis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does this book discuss making chocolate decorations? I just saw the Wybauw book on the subject, but it's expensive and not readily available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does this book discuss making chocolate decorations? I just saw the Wybauw book on the subject, but it's expensive and not readily available.

No, this book doesn't cover decoration. The Wybauw book is definately the best I've seen for that. They carry it at Chocolat-Chocolat. I know Qzina has it too, they are always trying to get me to pick up the copy they got for me, but I found it months earlier elsewhere.

$59.85 on Amazon!!!


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made the dulce de leche truffles. Instead of a truffle shell, I used the new Italian mould that is round with the Mayan design. I also used the airbrush and sprayed with red PCB. The dulce du leche I bought at an Italian grocery store. It really is quite a nice flavour. I will try to get a picture and post it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are the pictures. I don't think the true colours showed up as I took the pictures and not my hubby!

gallery_51392_4468_42906.jpg

gallery_51392_4468_2573.jpg

gallery_51392_4468_75677.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Vanessa. Tammy had the mould displayed in some of her photos from another posting and I fell in love with the mould!! The true colour did not come thru very well. The recipe is out of Greweling's book and it is delicious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Everyone,

a callout to those of you who have made the Meltaways in this book. I am having trouble finding the coconut fat. I found what I thought may have been correct at a Vietnamese supermarket this weekend (called Creamed Coconut and was a solid and 70% fat) but the result was a pleasant tasting coconut chocolate rather than a meltaway.

For those of you who have succesfully made this product, what brandname of coconut fat did you use? Does it have an ingredient list? What % of fat was on the nutritional information? Any help would be appreciated :smile:


Edited by gap (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indian markets often have coconut fat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Indian markets often have coconut fat.

I found some at my local grocery (organic) & at Walmart non-organic but 1/3 the price. Both were sold as coconut oil.


Edited by mrose (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks gfron, I'll give that a try.

mrose - was the coconut oil solid at room temperature? Also, can you remember what % fat was on the nutritional information panel (the coconut cream I was using was only 70% fat)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks gfron, I'll give that a try.

mrose - was the coconut oil solid at room temperature? Also, can you remember what % fat was on the nutritional information panel (the coconut cream I was using was only 70% fat)

It was organic & solid at room temp, not sure which is # you want. 100% coconut oil, 60% Sat fat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info - anything which helps get me closer. I have looked for coconut oil at a few places but didn't realise it was solid at room temp, so that may be why I missed it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From Whole Foods I bought:

Spectrum brand Organic Coconut Oil

it is solid and white and in a glass jar with a golden lid.

While the meltaways were nice, I thought they weren't creamy enough. I have a feeling many of the meltaways I've eaten in my life contained shortening.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Trishiad. I notice a few people have mentioned organic food stores. We have one near us at a local market so I might give that a try this weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My coconut oil came from an asian store, it is actually in a bottle so you have to warm the whole bottle to get any out. This product is sometimes kept with the hair care products - you just need to be sure it is pure.

I use half milk half plain chocolate for my meltaways and that gives quite a nice texture. I've tried them with lime oil and mint oil and like both, but the mint was more distinctive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all for the advice. I stopped by an organic foodstore on the way home last night and they knew exactly what I was after when I asked for coconut oil (which I had just always assumed was a liquid which is why I couldn't find it previously). Hopefully I'll get a chance to try these on the weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By JohnT
      I have heard over the years of bakers using beetroot in chocolate cakes to "enrich" them. I have never done this and I am not too fond of beetroot in its various forms (a childhood "thing"). However, I have been requested to bake a chocolate cake using "beetroot juice" in the recipe - the person requesting the cake even supplied me with the recipe!
       
      Right, this is a first time for me doing this and I need to make a sample cake to make sure it results in an edible cake. The recipe calls for 250ml (a metric cup) beetroot juice. So my question is, how would I produce a cup of this beetroot juice? Just wiz a few raw beets in a blender and strain out the juice? Do I boil the beets first or use them raw? Ignorance is sometimes bliss - but sometimes not.
       
      Help with this dilemma would be appreciated for this beet ignorant sod in "Darkest Africa".
      John.
    • By Kasia
      MILLET GROATS CHOCOLATE CREME WITH CRANBERRY MOUSSE
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for the best chocolate crème I have ever eaten. It is thick, smooth and very chocolaty in flavour and colour. Despite the chocolate, the dessert isn't too sweet. But if somebody thinks that it is, I recommend serving it with slightly sour fruit mousse. You can use cherries, currants or cranberries. You will make an unusually yummy arrangement and your dessert will look beautiful.

      My children were delighted with this dessert. I told them about the fact it had been made with millet groats after they had eaten it, and ... they didn't believe me. Next time I will prepare the millet groats crème with a double portion of ingredients.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      chocolate crème
      100g of millet groats
      200g of dark chocolate
      1 tablespoon of dark cocoa
      250ml of almond milk
      fruit mousse
      250g of fresh cranberries
      juice and peel of one orange
      half a teaspoon of grated ginger
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Boil the millet groats in salty water and drain them. Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie. Blend the millet groats, chocolate, cocoa and milk very thoroughly until you have very smooth crème. Pour the milk in gradually to make the right consistency of your desert. Prepare the fruit mousse. Put the washed cranberries, ginger, juice orange peel and sugar into a pot. Boil until the fruits are soft. Blend. Put the chocolate crème into some small bowls. Put the fruit mousse on top. Decorate with peppermint leaves. Serve at once or chilled.

      Enjoy your meal!


    • By KennethT
      Is there a discussion in the book about the purpose of adding ascorbic acid?  I just saw the contest #2 in which the recipe called for it.  I'm curious because a woman I know on the internet used to work in a bakery in Vietnam, and said that to get similar results to the banh mi there, you need to add ascorbic acid.  Does it act as a gluten relaxer?  Traditional banh mi have a very tender and crisp crust, and a very light and tender, relatively closed crumb.
    • By Paul Bacino
      I want to make some candied mint leaves for a dessert. Would you blanch them first to set the color ? Dry them, coat in egg wash. Coat with confectioners sugar or super
      fine sugar ? Dry in oven at a low temp or on the counter? How long will they last?
      I will be serving this with a lemon panna cotta with a blueberry or blk berry sauce.
      Paul
    • By ChristysConfections
      I am trying to find boxes like these pictured below, with matching candy trays and candy pads. They are about the size of a piece of paper and about 2-2 1/2 inches high. Haven’t had any luck finding them domestically. Anyone else use something like these? How do you store/package your bulk chocolates?
       


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×