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Kerry Beal

Cooking with "Chocolates and Confections" by Peter Greweling (Part 1)

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emmalish   

This is great, thanks Tiny! I feel like I'm taking the course through you. I've never made butter ganache either, but now I want to try it.


I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

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Tiny   

No prob emmalish...yeah you should deffinately try them!

Kerry, Under the cinnamon stacks is a very thin layer or marzipan that is backed with chocolate.

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Tiny   

Last 2 days we finished up with non crystaline confections and started crystaline confections.

Lior, I made liquor cordials today (lemoncello ones) so I can answer that question you had. The reason chef Greweling says to cook unsweetened liquor to 119 and sweetened to 117 has to do with the balance of sugar in the final liquid. At 119 the syrup is on the edge of being a super saturated sugar solution which is what you are after since in starch molding these you want the very edge to crystalize while leaving the centers liquid. The reason that you'd cook a sweetened liquor solution to a lower temp is so you'd have a slight bit more water in the solution to compensate for the extra sugar you're adding with the liquor. When he says to add the liquor at the end and that it should be warm, he just means warm to the touch, not hot, not cold so as to not shock the sugar. If you are filling truffle shells instead of starch molding, he said that he would cook the sugar a few degrees lower and let it cool covered with a damp rag and plastic wrap till it was room temp. The reason for the lower temp is that it isn't as important to be toeing the edge of super saturation since all that really needs to crystalize is the very tip at the opening of the truffle.......hope this helps. There are pictures at the link I've posted to my facebook album.

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Last 2 days we finished up with non crystaline confections and started crystaline confections.

Enjoyed those last pictures of the starch molded confections. Are those starch moguls homemade or purchased?

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Tiny   

They are homemade and easy to make. To make them, you fill a cheap chocolate mold (or any kind of mold) with plaster and let it set then glue them onto a stick.

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Lior   

Very very nice! Thank you ever so much!! I guess he should have written: "heat sugar syrup" not liquour, to 119! I am glad you cleared that up for me! Thanks for the pictures! It seems an amazing course! I wrote to him and asked if he could come here and he actually answered me! I hope it will work out!

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Very very nice! Thank you ever so much!! I guess he should have written: "heat sugar syrup" not liquour, to 119! I am glad you cleared that up for me! Thanks for the pictures! It seems an amazing course! I wrote to him and asked if he could come here and he actually answered me! I hope it will work out!

Does this mean we are all heading to Israel for a class?

edited to correctly spell Israel!


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

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Tiny,

Thanks for all the great info. Many years ago I tried making the liqueur cordials and they crystallized severely! When you gently stir the syrup and alcohol together, how should it be done? Some books suggest pouring from one container to another a couple of times. What method were you taught?

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Tiny   

More pictures up at my facebook album, finished the cordials today, made some pralines "yankee" style....

Prairiegirl, there are 3 possible reasons why the sugar would over crystalize. The first and most likely is that it can be over cooked. Cordials are super temperature dependant and even a degree or two over can cause them to over crystalize. The 2nd possibility is that the syrup was agitated too much when the liquor was added. We stirred the liquor in very gently with a rubber spat, but after we did this, Chef came over and told us that the safer way would be to pour the two back and forth between 2 containers, that way you know they are fully mixed and it is gentle on the syrup. The 3rd possible way to over crystalize the cordials is to use improper sugar cooking technique, a few seed crystals stuck on the side of the pan or some adulterant in the syrup can ruin a whole batch. It's a very delicate process.

I found that lemoncello makes a very nice cordial, more potent liquors are too boozy for me. Chef said eau de vies make wonderful flavors, but are just too potent, which I agree with after tasting a grand marnier cordial...just too much alcohol!

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http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=2089...59e&id=50313279

2nd facebook album

Today was aerated confections day, I made Torrone, and finished my PB&J's from jelly day yesterday. Also the class plated up for "Grand Buffet" today.

Tomorrow is my last day of chocolates class....such a sad day.....it was such a great class!

That Torrone looks wonderful. And the collection of pralines - fabulous! I'm going to miss your class, perhaps not as much as you, but still...

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gap   
the safer way would be to pour the two back and forth between 2 containers, that way you know they are fully mixed and it is gentle on the syrup.

I agree with all of Tiny's points. The only thing I would add is we were always told to mix the alcohol and sugar syrup by pouring from one bowl to the next and only do three full cycles. Any more risks over-agitating the sugar.

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merlicky   

Tiny,

When you made the butter ganaches (if you made any that required fondant) what was the consistency of the fondant and what method did you use to get it incorporated smoothly.

I’ve made the lemon logs a few times and have had more trouble than I should getting the fondant to spread evenly throughout the batch. Thanks.

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Tiny   

merlicky, when making butter ganache with fondant as the sweetener, the butter needs to be soft. but not too soft and the fondant should be warmed to the consistency of the butter, but not too warm. Then you place them both into a kitchenaid and cream them together with the paddle, think creaming method like making pound cake, you cream them till the mixture is homogenous and light and airy.

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Spring   
For finishing salt, splurge and get something nice. And again, I would push for you to get the Big Tree Farms salt pyramids. HERE are the pyramids,
and here's all of their salts

Great products.


Would I need to get both or could I use the pyramid for both internal flavour and decoration and the fleur de sel the same?

[Moderator note: This topic continues here, Cooking with "Chocolates and Confections" by Peter Greweling (Part 2)]


Edited by Mjx Moderator note added. (log)

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