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World's Hottest Chili?


roger desmond
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Those are a relatively new find.

I grew a bunch of different kinds of hot peppers last year and hung out on a few pepper forums. There are a lot of factors involved in how hot a pepper is, but the consensus with these guys is that another similar strain, the Naga Jolokia, was one of (if not THE) hottest in the world.

You'd have to look and see what growing zone you're in before attempting to grow a certain kind of pepper (that's assuming you could even get the seeds...every time a "new world's hottest" strain comes along, the seeds fetch big bucks). I've heard of people in Maine and the Maritimes being able to grow hot peppers outdoors, but again it depends on the strain and the climate.

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Has anyone tried these Indian chilis?

Bhut Jolokia supposedly 1,001,304 Scoville Heat Units

If so, are you able to describe the experience? Can they be grown in the Northeast?

Quoting Tina Brooks of the C-H list, "Bih Jolokia, the Bhut Jolokia, the Naga Moresh, the raja mirchi and the Nagahari, and you can keep saying it until you are blue in the face, but it's the same pepper, grown in different areas. I have also found it under many more names. "

I haven't gotten any seedlings yet (hope to next month) but I have tasted it in a curry spice mix I found on e-bay. It ships from Great Britain and it's the hottest curry I ever ate. However not too hot that you can't eat it.

John S.

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Surely the list would include the merciless Quetzylsaccatanango Insanity Pepper, used in Chief Wiggum's chile-- "grown deep in the jungle primeval by the inmates of a Guatemalan insane asylum."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMIVBwwmZDk

Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

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apparently the jolakia just won the guinness book of worl records earlier this month for hottest pepper in the world beatin the red savina by nearly twice the capsacin count. That means the jolakia is roughly 120x hotter than the jalepno.

yikes.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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The Philippine siling labuyo has been in the Guiness World Record for being one of the hottest chili peppers in the world. Your mouth doesn't only go numb from the hotness but feels like it is literally on fire.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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  • 7 years later...

I came across info that suggests Ed Currie's "Carolina Reaper" is the world's hottest pepper, but I seem to recall others that were mentioned as being hotter.  What's hotter than the Carolina Reaper?  Here's a video of two idiots eating a Carolina Reaper.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LD65inj7KGQ

 

and another of one of the same guys drinking Carolina Reaper infused vodka:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfPTigPk-Oc

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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The Philippine siling labuyo has been in the Guiness World Record for being one of the hottest chili peppers in the world. Your mouth doesn't only go numb from the hotness but feels like it is literally on fire.

 

In fact, I remember that when I lived in the Philippines, some of my friends chopped up just one tiny piece of that chile and put it in another friend's rice pilaf as a joke.

 

It was really brutal.  I've never forgotten it.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Let me tell you a quick story__

 

I happen early in the planting yr, stumbled acroos a plant labled as the worlds hottest pepper.  So I figured it was a ghost pepper.

 

As the plant grows and fruit comes, I picked the first fruit.   3 peppers.  I was bummed.. the first peppers look just like habanero's.  Cheap.  I just let them go.

 

Weeks go on and fruit is in full production.  So I thought I'd make a tomato and pepper soup with stuff from the garden.  I roasted three peppers, one being the ( Habanero-Yeah ).  I just used one, cut in half in my soup.

 

I ate the half with my soup..  half hr later i had so much gut pain i was white as a ghost and almost passed out, now glad i didnt throw up.

 

So I went back to the garden to see what I ate--Bingo the plant fruit had mature and it was know evident that I had injested the Trinadad Scorpian pepper.. believed hotter than the Bhut.

 

Ouch the next day

Edited by Paul Bacino (log)
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Its good to have Morels

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I don't know, but it seems like every year some newly-bred monster becomes pain champion. 

How much hotter must a pepper get?

 

16 million is the max for pure capsaicin. It's amazing to think we're breeding peppers now that are basically 6% capsaicin.

PS: I am a guy.

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I wish the madness would stop.

Nobody needs weapons-grade chili peppers!!!!! 

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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A guy I worked with grew Habaneros in his garden. I don't know if he overwatered them or what, but they ended up with very little heat. You could eat them whole ... they were like pepperoncini. And they were delicious. Just incredible flavor. The idea of mild habaneros is probably sacrilege to the keepers of the faith, but I think it's worth exploring. I think it's also a reason my favorite hot sauces are habanero based.

Notes from the underbelly

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I've had them in a sauce/marinade a couple of times.

 

I say this finding most things that are meant to be stupidly hot ... not. I mean, a chunk of raw habanero? It's hot--don't let anyone tell you it isn't--but it's not that bad. After a few seconds the heat goes away and you're okay. The bhut, though? You can feel that shit on your fingers afterwards. The heat on your tongue goes away after a while but if presented in a sticky sauce it tends to stick to your lips. And every time you eat or drink for the next few minutes it comes back something fierce. It's pure heat. There's not the, say, vegetable/green/capsicum flavour you'd associate with jalapenos or habaneros or anything like that. The heat utterly dominates the flavour profile. 

 

I wouldn't use them in cooking. If presented with some I guess I'd put them in a hot sauce--cut heavily with some much milder peppers. 

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Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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A guy I worked with grew Habaneros in his garden. I don't know if he overwatered them or what, but they ended up with very little heat. You could eat them whole ... they were like pepperoncini. And they were delicious. Just incredible flavor. The idea of mild habaneros is probably sacrilege to the keepers of the faith, but I think it's worth exploring. I think it's also a reason my favorite hot sauces are habanero based.

I love playing at the upper reaches of chiles and hot sauces. We have occasional fun at work bringing in the latest super-hot thing one of use finds and torturing ourselves. That said, if somebody could consistently produce a habanero that still tastes like a habanero but at a fraction of the heat, I'd be all over them. Having that flavor available to use without concern for heat level would be awesome.

 

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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There are and have been mild habaneroes for some time now.....

 

http://www.chilepepperinstitute.org/content/files/Suave.pdf

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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I have had them and there are others.

 

Seeking flavor rather than heat isn't wimpy......it's a welcome relief for the silly peeing match of seeking and bearing the wrath of the hottest chile peppers.

 

Thankfully some folks are breeding for flavor rather than just crazy heat.  :smile:

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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Any of the chiles I have tried above the heat level of a red Savina Hab ,  just don't have a pleasant taste to them imo. Once you get into that range you pick up the offtastes I associate with extracts.    I did recently tried a 1 mil  scov hot sauce made with extract that was actually very fresh tasting. My only guess is that the capsaicin extraction method for their extract was done without a solvent like hexane.  

"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

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Hot chillis have other uses besides cooking.

 

dcarch

 

From Wiki:

 

"--

Medicinal[edit]

Capsaicin is considered a safe and effective topical analgesic agent in the management ofarthritis pain, herpes zoster-related pain, diabetic neuropathymastectomy pain, and headaches.[31] However, a study published in 2010 has linked capsaicin to skin cancer.[32][33]

Pepper spray[edit]
Main article: Pepper spray

Capsaicin extracted from chilis is used in pepper spray as an irritant, a form of less-lethal weapon.

Crop defense[edit]

Conflicts between farmers and elephants have long been widespread in African and Asian countries, where pachyderms nightly destroy crops, raid grain houses, and sometimes kill people. Farmers have found the use of chilies effective in crop defense against elephants. Elephants don't like capsaicin, the chemical in chilies that makes them hot. Because the elephants have a large and sensitive olfactory and nasal system, the smell of the chili causes them discomfort and deters them from feeding on the crops. By planting a few rows of the pungent fruit around valuable crops, farmers create a buffer zone through which the elephants are reluctant to pass. Chilly-Dung Bombs are also used for this purpose. They are bricks made of mixing dung and chili, and are burned, creating a noxious smoke that keeps hungry elephants out of farmers fields. This can lessen dangerous physical confrontation between people and elephants.[34] "

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I've grown these for several years. All the flavor of habs but very little heat.

http://www.chileplants.com/search.aspx?ProductCode=CHITRS

BTW they have most of the chiles mentioned above. I've bought from them many times and have been very happy with them. No affiliation.

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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