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tommy

cold sesame noodles

49 posts in this topic

I think there is no shame, no shame at all, well maybe not too too much shame, in using good-quality fresh (toasted sesame) tahini.

Maybe it was the recipe in Ken Hom's Chinese Cookery for Cold Spicy Noodles?  Sesame paste (or peanut butter), chili powder, garlic, chili oil, light and dark soy sauce, sesame oil, chili bean sauce, ginger, salt and sugar, blended together, not cooked.  Tossed with boiled dried or fresh egg noodles, tossed with sesame oil and chopped scallions.

Toby I think this is it, mine was a large-format paperback, companion publication, maybe, to a BBC cooking series?

What a good recipe. Happy to be reminded of it.


Priscilla


Writer, cook, & c.


● observing #TacoFriday since 2010 ● preoccupied with road trippin' ● always ISO of the next #truckgram


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Priscilla, large format paperback companion to the PBS series. That's it.

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Um, tommy. Sorry to join in on the circling crew of stone throwers. You can use tahini in a pinch. But I find that the quality is really unpredictable. Basically too, it's like the differences between Chinese and Japanese soy sauces. They're not the same. Though you later recanted on bitterness, that's exactly how rancid tahini tastes. Best to use sesame paste with or without peanut butter. I agree with Toby about the E Fu noodles too. They have enough body to not become gluey with the sauce.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Though you later recanted on bitterness

Finally the truth comes out that not only are you guilty of tahini abuse, Tommy, but also you are a hypocrite and a perjurer. Now please get the right product before you waste any more of our time.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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... E Fu noodles too. They have enough body to not become gluey with the sauce.

Anyone have any ideas about how to make E Fu noodles from scratch?

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That procedure is known as: Not worth the trouble!

It's fun to make noodles.

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Finally the truth comes out that not only are you guilty of tahini abuse, Tommy, but also you are a hypocrite and a perjurer. Now please get the right product before you waste any more of our time.

fd5ad59c.jpg

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Yes but with E-Fu noodles you have to deep-fat-fry them, so it's a godawful mess.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Yes but with E-Fu noodles you have to deep-fat-fry them, so it's a godawful mess.

Cooking can be messy.

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I just want to make sure that tommy still knows not to use tahini.


Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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Though you later recanted on bitterness

Finally the truth comes out that not only are you guilty of tahini abuse, Tommy, but also you are a hypocrite and a perjurer. Now please get the right product before you waste any more of our time.

Objection, counsel is badgering the witness.

Stefany, I'm not sure I understand why tommy should not use sambal. It is a gift from the gods and they would be offended if it were not used.

BTW, tommy, see jon's post above.

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--------------------

i see drunk people, eating tahini ™


-- Jeff

"I don't care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as members." -- Groucho Marx

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Finally the truth comes out that not only are you guilty of tahini abuse, Tommy, but also you are a hypocrite and a perjurer. Now please get the right product before you waste any more of our time.

fd5ad59c.jpg

Wow Tommy izzat your fridge you have a lot a lot a lot of condiments!

I have never seen this brand of tahini maybe you've unwittingly, as opposed to wittingly, been the butt of a very elaborate practical joke...is that possible, I mean, I'm just askin'.

Teehee Bigbear, only what about I see drunk people, eating RANCID tahini.


Priscilla


Writer, cook, & c.


● observing #TacoFriday since 2010 ● preoccupied with road trippin' ● always ISO of the next #truckgram


Twitter Instagram  Orange Coast Magazine

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Wow Tommy izzat your fridge you have a lot a lot a lot of condiments!

And fine taste in mustard, I'll say; I've tried both. The German one on the left is especially good.

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A few months ago I was in the mood for cold sesame noodles and I had a brain block on where to find my favorite recipe. I ripped apart my recipe box and my recipe folder and looked through cookbooks at Barnes and Noble. Finally I found it in my old Time-Life book on Chinese cooking. Will post it later when I get home. Calls for sesame seed paste -- I prefer the Lan Chi brand.

Now throw a few eggplants on the grill or roast 'em in a hot oven so you can make Baba Ganouj with all that leftover rancid tahini.

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Mrs. Tommy enters the kitchen to find her husband leaning into the fridge taking a picture of himself giving a row of condiments, and possibly a jar of tahini in particular, the finger.

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Mrs. Tommy enters the kitchen to find her husband leaning into the fridge taking a picture of himself giving a row of condiments, and possibly a jar of tahini in particular, the finger.

i think she did find it all a bit curious.

to clarify, the appendage was meant for fat guy.

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to clarify, the appendage was meant for fat guy.

Where was he? Behind the mustard?

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i've been experimenting with tahini lately and i find it to be very powerful--my advice is less is more, maybe. cut back.

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I hear you, stellabella. I started off experimenting with tahini, and soon things spiralled out of my control. Lately I've cut back to just two spoonfuls a day, and I'm telling you, it's...it's...difficult.

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I hear you, stellabella. I started off experimenting with tahini, and soon things spiralled out of my control. Lately I've cut back to just two spoonfuls a day, and I'm telling you, it's...it's...difficult.

I quit stone-cold; it's the only way.

and I can see it now, Miss J in a meeting, "my name is Miss J and I have a problem with tahini." :laugh:

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