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Vegetables "No One" Likes


enurmi
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After reviewing this thread I've decided that the only two vegtables I really don't like are okra and eggplant. In both cases it's more of a textural than a taste issue, and I'm willing to grant that I may never have had okra properly prepared.

I don't care for zuchinni either, but that's grounded on more of a philosophical than a culinary basis.

SB :rolleyes:

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I don't care for zucchini either, but that's grounded on more of a philosophical than a culinary basis.

SB  :rolleyes:

What's the philosophy of zucchini?

I'm just suspicious about how anything so easy to grow could actually be that good? :huh:

I doubt if zucchini themselves have any particular philosophy. :hmmm:

SB (perhaps they're libertines :biggrin: )

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I don't care for zucchini either, but that's grounded on more of a philosophical than a culinary basis.

SB  :rolleyes:

What's the philosophy of zucchini?

I'm just suspicious about how anything so easy to grow could actually be that good? :huh:

I doubt if zucchini themselves have any particular philosophy. :hmmm:

SB (perhaps they're libertines :biggrin: )

Actually, I think they're probably conspiring to take over the world. :wink:

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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[...]sweet potatos taste surprisingly good raw, anyone else agree?

Yuck! :biggrin: But to each his/her own.

Have you never nibbled a bit while chopping them? They are surprisingly good raw. Though I've never actually set out to eat them raw.

I've tried them. I don't like them raw.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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When I get specks I pot roast them with turnips. that's the only time I ever cook them.

I think chaote squash get a bum rap. easy to grow, and great matchsticked in a salad. Cooked and stuffed they can handle and compliment everything from a delicate crab mix to italian sausage.

Now i'm going to have to hit the farmers market in the morning, I feel a ratatouille (sp)coming on.

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I absolutely hate celery with a passion. I go out of my way to express my dislike of it. You know how, over time, you can gradually work something into your diet that you didn't like previously? Celery refuses play ball with me. I find the taste very "chemical-y" .

Other than that, I have never met a vegetable, or a fruit for that matter, that I didn't like.

I'm very easily pleased when it comes to flavours, I honestly can't think of many things that I dislike, other than strong fish and offal. I'm not mad on celeriac either, since, obviously it tastes like celery.

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  • 1 month later...

The first thing that comes to my mind when I hear broccoli is one cooked in garlic and oyster sauce. Sweet and crunchy. I always used to wonder about kids on tv who complain about eating broccoli when I've always loved it. I also like it in pasta, with fresh or dried tomatoes (it seems like I prefer the Chinese and Italian ways of handling vegetables). Same for cauliflower.

I've also always loved asparagus, in stir-fries, soup, and sandwiches.

I used to hate peas but now I find them particularly great in fried rice and stew.

Mushrooms I'd put in anything. But I could never pass up a stuffed mushroom.

Mark

The Gastronomer's Bookshelf - Collaborative book reviews about food and food culture. Submit a review today! :)

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I don't believe I've ever tasted a rutabaga, and it's rare to see them in the markets where I live.

I*'m not surprised, since rutabaga, since are native to colder climates. They migrated from Scandinavian countries to the British Isles into the Northern Midwest states.

My old friend "Martoon", when he was in 4H, grew a rutabaga in his sandbox that weighed over 14 pounds! It easily won the Blue Ribbon at the County Fair that year. In fact, it was so big that Martoon, who was good at math, figured he could have cut his giant rutabaga in two and won both the First and Third Place Ribbons with the pieces.

Cutting it in two would have best been accomplished with a chain saw though, since rutabaga, when they get large, have the consistency of a block of wood.

SB (Growing rutabaga in Hawaii would be like growing pineapple in Minnesota :wink: )

I never liked these growing up in Australia, but when I moved to Scotland and tasted them again after 10 years ago I found them to be delicious. On moving back to Australia I find that I still hate them here. The varieties are obviously very different. The Scottish type is very large (as big a honeydew melon), mild flavoured and very sweet, the Australian version is a 1/5 -1/4 of the size, not as sweet and has a very pungent flavour.

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i always feel like an outsider - i hate broccoli. it seems to be the one veg *everyone* loves - even if they just love it covered in cheezy goo. i was never indoctrinated into the love of cheezy goo, and (thus?) i'm still deeply suspicious of broccoli. i think the green giant is evil bigfoot - caught red-handed in the act of deforestation.

all those tiny trees...where is the joy in eating the amazon? (i know!!! but i can't help it)

from overheard in new york:

Kid #1: Paper beats rock. BAM! Your rock is blowed up!

Kid #2: "Bam" doesn't blow up, "bam" makes it spicy. Now I got a SPICY ROCK! You can't defeat that!

--6 Train

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Well how uncool and un-foodie is this: I hate raw fennel and overly anisey/licorice tasting things. I like the taste of fennel seed in sausages and certain spice mixtures such as five spice powder, but sipping anisette or ouzo or crunching through a pile of raw fennel in a salad would make me hurl. I do like fennel when cooked and part of my not very traditional recipe for ratatouille where I either saute or grill the main components before combining them and finishing them in the oven.

Also uncool/non-foodie vegetable dislikes: radicchio, escarole, frisee, belgian endive. Lovely to look at, but way too bitter.

Edited by divalasvegas (log)

Inside me there is a thin woman screaming to get out, but I can usually keep the Bitch quiet: with CHOCOLATE!!!

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Fennel, sorry but I hate you. Eggplant- if you need so much work to be edible then I'll just dip my shoe in tomato sauce and call it a day. Parsnips- they just don't understand. You are so tasty in stews and when roasted. Someday they will love you. Maybe.

Melissa

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