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Vibrating tables


tammylc
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Talk to me about vibrating tables. I don't have one - I'm banging around my molds by hand, and ending up with more holes and bubbles than I want. Could be I just need more practice and to tweak my technique. But what do I need to know about vibrating tables? Who has one? What do you and don't you like about it? How is it used? Where's the best buy for a chocolatier on a budget?

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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Talk to me about vibrating tables.  I don't have one - I'm banging around my molds by hand, and ending up with more holes and bubbles than I want.  Could be I just need more practice and to tweak my technique.  But what do I need to know about vibrating tables?  Who has one?  What do you and don't you like about it?  How is it used?  Where's the best buy for a chocolatier on a budget?

Read this thread, it has info you need,

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...vibrating+table

Mark

Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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Hi Tammy,

It has been posted previously that someone used a dental vibrating table. A very inexpensive alternative to buying one from a chocolate supply company. I have yet to find one on e-bay.

I think Trishiad uses one?

We'll see if she chimes in.

I think they are useful and will help eliminate bubbles, etc. But you can also do this by priming your molds (painting a thin layer of chocolate inside certain more detailed molds). But this is time consuming and maybe not something worth considering.

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Hi Tammy,

It has been posted previously that someone used a dental vibrating table.  A very inexpensive alternative to buying one from a chocolate supply company.  I have yet to find one on e-bay.

I think Trishiad uses one?

We'll see if she chimes in.

I think they are useful and will help eliminate bubbles, etc.  But you can also do this by priming your molds (painting a thin layer of chocolate inside certain more detailed molds).  But this is time consuming and maybe not something worth considering.

Just search on "dental vibrator" & you will get 9 choices.

Mark

Edited by mrose (log)

Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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You guys are the best. Thanks for the link!

So, since it looks like I'll have one in the not-so-distant future, how do you use it? How long does the mold need to be on it (typically - I know it will vary based on chocolate viscosity, etc).

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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shouldn't need to be on the vibrator any longer than about 30 seconds or so.

where i've worked, they fill one mold, put it on the table, fill another mold, remove the first mold and then put the new mold on the table. as fast as that.

but you're correct, it does depend on viscosity, etc.

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I use a dental investment vibrator that I bought on ebay for not much money (~ $60). It works just great. I put my filled tray on the vibrator for, oh I don't know, about 15 seconds or so - depends on the viscosity.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Alana is right, I do use a dental vibrator. It's the larger rectangular one. I wrap it completely in plastic wrap before I use it. I place the mold on top and slowly increase the vibration. I find that this helps the bubbles work their way up. I don't usually leave on tray on while I fill another because sometimes they bounce right off. They can move around quite a bit. Often, I tuck my pinky up into the corner of the mold so that it can bounce a bunch but doesn't fall off.

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I have a homemade one I got from the people I bought my temperer from. It has about 2" high plexiglass strips screwed on each side so they rise up about 1 1/2 inches above the table to keep the molds from falling off.

check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

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I have this one: http://www.chefrubber.com/Shopping/shopexd.asp?id=711

I usually tape a half sheet pan on top of it (taping from the edge of the sheet pan to the bottom of the vibrator. I can put two molds on it at once.

How I work when doing a lot of molds:

- fill a mold and put it on the far side of the vibrating sheet pan.

- fill a second mold

- slide the first mold to the near side

- place the new mold on the far side

- fill another mold

- in one swift motion, remove the first mold with the left hand, slide the second mold using the third mold and then place the third mold

- empty the first mold and flop it upside down on a wire rack

The added bonus with the vibrator on the table is that when the molds are upside down on the rack, it helps vibrate the extra chocolate out.

Patrick Sikes

www.MyChocolateJournal.com

A new chocolate review community

PS I Love You Fine Chocolates

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forgot to add, you can always do as posters above have noted, expand the top of the vibrating table by adding a sheet pan or risers or something. and, you can add a rubber mat (like the kind you put under glasses in your cabinet) to keep the molds from bouncing off.

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  • 4 years later...

For those of you who have one, how loud are these things? I guess anything is quieter than banging molds against the edge of the stainless steel prep table :laugh: But is it quiet enough to use in an open kitchen during dinner service without being obnoxious?

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For those of you who have one, how loud are these things? I guess anything is quieter than banging molds against the edge of the stainless steel prep table :laugh: But is it quiet enough to use in an open kitchen during dinner service without being obnoxious?

They are pretty loud.

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Only cursory review, but piqued by initially reading vibrating table just before Valentine's Day made me think...not cooking thoughts.

But as I looked it made me think, if you can find one, buy an old electric football game from a garage sale if they are available. You plug it in and turn it on and the thing just gently vibrate. It's aluminum, IIRC, so easy to clean if you care.

I've never made chocolate so I don't know if that works, but thought I'd throw it out there.

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