Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Tasting menu options in Seattle


Recommended Posts

Went back a bunch of month, but didn't see anything specific to this topic.

Any suggestions on good tasting menu options in the Seattle area? We'd like to put our tongues and stomachs in the hands of the chef, omakase-style. But not necessarily for Japanese food.

Reading great things about Mistral, but looking for less expensive options.

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Union, Tilth, Lark.

Any place with a good chef.

While I'm sure any of these places will do a tasting menu upon request, they don't have it as a standard part of their menus and based on my recent experience, I wouldn't ask for one at Tilth.

Other that Mistral and Rover's, Lampreia & Le Gourmand both offer tasting menus as part of the menu.

Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.

- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... based on my recent experience, I wouldn't ask for one at Tilth.

Just curious, what experience would that be?

I requested a tasting menu and ended up with a seemingly random assortment of dishes from the menu, some which actively clashed with each other. I'm a firm believer that a tasting menu should be something other than a long parade of unrelated plates. Good tasting menus have a sequence where dishes build on what's come before and lay the foundation of what is yet to come. I left Tilth confident that I could have composed a more satisfying meal by selecting from the menu myself.

Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.

- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With the new menu format at Mistral, you could argue that it's the same as an omakase format--what's the chef's interpretation of today's best menu given market and season. But, at Mistral, that's what everyone gets.

But, it's great.

Scott at Lampreia is also worth a visit, at least once. If you can navigate Scott, then you may find the menu inspired. Or, you may find it to just be a PITA.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, looking for a tasting menu as part of the standard menu - or a chef accustomed to offering it.

Anyone care to associate approximate prices with their tasting menu experiences?

While I'm sure any of these places will do a tasting menu upon request, they don't have it as a standard part of their menus and based on my recent experience, I wouldn't ask for one at Tilth.

Other that Mistral and Rover's, Lampreia & Le Gourmand both offer tasting menus as part of the menu.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Le Gourmand's is $75, no dessert.

Rover's $80, $95, and $130

Earth and Ocean - $42 plus $27 for paired wines

Cascadia, $50 or $65 plus $40 for paired wines.

Little experience...

In light of such great options...I would say, Cascadia is my LEAST favorite option. My friend and I went there a couple months ago. We ordered the tasting menu and some dishes from the main menu. Overall, the styling was great but I was not a fan of their food. It was beautiful but lacked flavor. I wanted to like it, but didn't. In sum...plenty of glam...but not much deliciousness.

Traca

Seattle, WA

blog: Seattle Tall Poppy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Appreciating all the suggestions so far. I stumbled upon the article mentioned just above in my early search, and need to follow up on Andaluca.

Quality at Nishino is quite good, but it's too "Madison Park" for my liking. A lot of money, a lot of pretension. For sushi, I want a little bit more of an authentic Japanese experience where the fish, not the fashion, does the talking.

A lot of the suggestions do approach the cost of Mistral - putting them (and especially Mistral) out of my price range. The search continues...

Edited by dimsumfan (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, March is the 25 for $25 month. That's get you 3 courses for $25 - a mini-tasting menu. But not necessarily the best the chef has to offer.

There's also Bento boxes at Japanese places, or all those side dishes at Korean ones.

Another option is to make your own tasting menu - at Union and many other great places, the appetizers and bar menu items are in the $8-12 range and are big enough to be considered tastings for 2, at least. So order 6 and split them. $30 each more or less, plus drinks. You can create your own tasting menu pretty easily this way. We eat this way often when we go out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think you're going to find a true tasting menu anywhere for less than $50 pre wine/tax/tip. Actually, I'd say $65 is the floor, with $50 being the costs of a comparable omakase at Nishino. ( Which I know you're already against.) Maybe you're best bet would be at Elemental at Gasworks. They do 3 courses for around $35. The wine pairings are superb, and they don't accept tips.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Henry. Elemental could be an interesting option. I might also consider a different approach, which I may explore in a different thread...

I don't think you're going to find a true tasting menu anywhere for less than $50 pre wine/tax/tip. Actually, I'd say $65 is the floor, with $50 being the costs of a comparable omakase at Nishino. ( Which I know you're already against.) Maybe you're best bet would be at Elemental at Gasworks. They do 3 courses for around $35. The wine pairings are superb, and they don't accept tips.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's funny... I didn't realize Nishino was considered so highfalutin' and pretentious. I know it isn't cheap, but it seemed to have rather ordinary interior design and the chef is quite down-to-earth. Maybe it's a vibe thing? I just thought it had a very casual feeling, tablecloths notwithstanding.

My only irritation was when, with two Japanese people at the table, one of whom was a regular, they sent a waiter who spoke only English, resulting in some communication hurdles when we requested a few off-menu items (and some that are on the menu, because the waiter had been tuned to hear incorrect American pronunciations of various dishes).

(as a caveat, since my visit there, they've also subsequently bought a few things from me).

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...