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Lenten and Good Friday foods


Rinsewind
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However, fanesca was a good reason to follow tradition during "Holy Week"

Basically a braised salt cod dish featuring 12 different types of lentils, beans and other grains. Soooooo good

Now, that 12 is just the "base" number, representing the 12 disciples of Jesus. However, if I remember correctly, there were over 30 grains to choose from in the markets when this time of the year came close. It would be no surprise to find a recipe wih over those 12 grains.

This sounds delicious as do the garnishes of fried plantains and hard boiled eggs mentioned in the link.

Fanesca is my favorite soup. I just added my wife's version to RecipeGullet. Click here to have a look.

-- Jeff

"I don't care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as members." -- Groucho Marx

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Fanesca is my favorite soup. I just added my wife's version to RecipeGullet. Click here to have a look.

Thank you very much for posting this, bigbear. It looks like a very interesting recipe--lots of ingredients that I haven't seen together before.

I looked up one of the ingredients that I was not familiar with, the "faves" or "habas". The translation I came up with is "broad beans". You mention this as a canned item. Would the can be labeled as "faves" or "habas" and at what type of store would have the most luck in finding them? Would one find lupini beans in the same place; other substitutes for either of these?

Thanks in advance!

edited to add: My Lenten Fridays so far have not been traditional dishes, from other countries at least. So far some of the meals have been, linquine and clams, tuna fish cakes with homefries, and a side of green beans and carrots, tomato-red pepper soup with mushroom tortellini and grilled cheese sandwiches. This weekI think I may make the Austrian Kaiserschmarren dish I mentioned upthread.

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I looked up one of the ingredients that I was not familiar with, the "faves" or "habas".  The translation I came up with is "broad beans".  You mention this as a canned item.  Would the can be labeled as "faves" or "habas" and at what type of store would have the most luck in finding them?  Would one find lupini beans in the same place; other substitutes for either of these?

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Part of the fun is trying to remember where you found the ingredients for last year's Fanesca.

Fave or fava or haba beans remind me of large lima beans. Goya packages the beans dried and labels them as fava beans, but it's a lot easier if you don't have to cook dried beans. Grocery stores near Latino neighborhoods are good places to start.

Lupini beans are known as chochos in Ecuador. They add a crunchy element to the soup and shouldn't be left out, IMHO. I find 16 oz. jars of them in supermarkets that carry a large selection of Victoria products. Italian specialty stores should have them too. I have seen another brand.

-- Jeff

"I don't care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as members." -- Groucho Marx

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Growing up, almost every Lenten Friday was fried fish, dal (lentils) or a tomato soup/stew and rice; still a meal I crave. We're Catholic Indians, and my parents grew up near coastal areas, so fish was featured often, especially fried.

Too bad, my husband isn't a big fish or dal eater, and winter tomatoes are terrible :raz: But fried fish is always welcome :biggrin:

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