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bigbear

Homemade Liqueurs

154 posts in this topic

If I ever find bourbon here under $200 a bottle, I'll try that. In the meantime, though, I've got excellent aguardiente puro that should do in a pinch, and a cute little cask to oak it up a bit afterwards.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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For the first time ever, we got Meyer lemons over here in December. Among other things, I made "Meyerello", i.e. limoncello. Everything fine so far, except that I used unrefined (well, at least not totally refined) sugar.

At first I didn't notice anything, but there is some brown gunk floating in my beautiful limoncello. It seems mostly suspended, but with tendency to accumulate more at the top of the bottle than at the bottom. Can I assume that there are just the impurities from the semi-brown sugar? I used 96 % alcohol, diluted 1:1 with distilled water (+ 400 g sugar to the 2 l of liquid). At that alcohol concentration, I don't think anything should be growing in there, no? (Plus it's happened in all eight bottles.)

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Hi Pep.

Yes, I've got something 'growing' in my attempt at Cynar at the moment. As you say, nothing should be able to!

I'd suggest filtering. I think the best bet is several layers of cheesecloth/muslin, although you'll have to accept a certain amount of loss from soaking into the material. People recommend coffee filters but I find they're really slow (read: you'll be hours waiting for the last bit to go through) and there's always the risk that the wet paper will let go at a crucial moment (read: just when you've got 7½ bottlesworth nicely filtered and still under the funnel).

If the stuff still smells good, and I can't see why it wouldn't, it should still be eminently drinkable. Good luck!


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

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Hi Pep,

I've got the same thing in my latest batches of Limoncello and Limecello; since I use "pure" sugar I assumed that it was either some impurity from the citrus itself (read, pectin or other long-chain goodies) or from the gum arabic I used in the gomme syrup preparation (because I like the smoothness it imparts).

I just skim it off using a teensy little spoon, and it doesn't re-accumulate, so no harm and no foul.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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