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shaloop
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Someone once posted a link to a silicone pan that they use when baking cheesecake. They put a 9x3" round cheesecake pan with removeable bottom inside a 9" round silicone cake pan and place into a waterbath. I've searched and searched but I can't find it. Anyone remember this?

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Someone once posted a link to a silicone pan that they use when baking cheesecake.  They put a 9x3" round cheesecake pan with removeable bottom inside a 9" round silicone cake pan and place into a waterbath.  I've searched and searched but I can't find it.  Anyone remember this?

I don't remember this, but have no problem wrapping two sheets of extra strength foil around the bottom and outside of the cheesecake pan when using a water bath. I've never experienced leakage.

Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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Are you talking about this:

cheesecake without crust, how to?

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I don't remember this, but have no problem wrapping two sheets of extra strength foil around the bottom and outside of the cheesecake pan when using a water bath.  I've never experienced leakage.

This is for large quantities. I thought the silicone pan idea was great because it's reusable over and over and should just fit over the metal, loose-bottom pan. I have the regular 9x3 round solid pans which is what I'll mostly use. BUt I have a couple of cheesecakes with a sour cream topping that I don't want to mar by flipping over to unmold. For those I"ll use a loose bottom pan but don't want to have to use 2 sheets of foil for each one, each time. Someone here posted a link to the silicone pan they use which is 9.25" and I can't find that post. I've tried out several different silicone pans and they are either a little too small or too big.

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at the right temperature, there really is no need to bake cheesecake in a water bath at all.  that could save you some trouble.

Well, I've tested many, many cheesecake recipes and techniques and although I can bake a crack-free cheesecake without a waterbath (at a low temp) I prefer the creamier texture of the cheesecake baked in a waterbath.

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at the right temperature, there really is no need to bake cheesecake in a water bath at all.  that could save you some trouble.

Well, I've tested many, many cheesecake recipes and techniques and although I can bake a crack-free cheesecake without a waterbath (at a low temp) I prefer the creamier texture of the cheesecake baked in a waterbath.

i bake mostly individual cheesecakes in ring molds. there's no way for me to use a water bath and ring molds. they are very creamy. it has more to do with time and temperature than water bath imo.

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Hi Shaloop,

I've done this with just about any cheesecake recipe. I'm sure the following recipe is just the simplest:

1#11oz cream cheese, room temp

8 oz sugar

4 eggs

(flavor as you like. i usually put some lemon or orange zest in with the cream cheese and maybe a vanilla bean or two, split and scraped)

cream the cream cheese and add the sugar, scraping down often to avoid lumps. add eggs slowly, scraping down frequently.

portion into ring molds that have crust pressed into the bottom (graham cracker with butter is fine. i also usually just bake off short dough and run it through the food processor. there's enough fat in the dough that i don't have to add butter to the crumbs)

bake at 325F (depending on your oven. you can go as low as 300F)

now, i guess the tricky part (if you can even call it tricky) is to take the cheesecakes out of the oven before they start to souffle too much. they should puff just a tiny bit but they should still jiggle a bit as well. sort of like a firm jell-o.

i've also topped these with a sour cream/sugar mixture and then put them back into the oven for a minute or two to set the sour cream. allow to cool completely (overnight in fridge), torch gently around the ring to unmold.

removing the cheesecake from the oven before it is completely set up is the key. i think people tend to overbake cheesecake. it is a baked custard by definition, so you treat it the same way you'd treat a creme brulee. that's why i think people usually bake in a water bath. but, if you're good with the timing, you shouldn't have a problem without the water bath.

maybe with individual sized cheesecakes, it is easier to bake them because there's less volume? but i think if you don't overfill your pans, it should be just as easy in a springform?! just don't try to make the cheesecakes too tall.

hope that helps. i've had to bake tons of cheesecakes for work, so i'm not just blowing smoke up your *** :laugh:

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