Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Eggs


zpzjessica
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am looking for interesting uses for eggs (in cocktails, as a garnish, non food-related uses...), unusual recipes containing eggs, or people who devote their lives/careers to eggs.

These can be any type of eggs - chicken, ostrich, snake, turtle, quail, fish (caviar and roe)...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is going to be fun - but that's a big brief you've given us zpzjessica!

There are lots of fun historic recipes and ideas for eggs, so I dont know where to start.

Here are a couple of random choices:

From Eliza Acton's 'Modern Cookery for Private Families', 1845 - it was traditional to serve Turtle Soup with eggs found inside the turtle as a garnish. If there were no eggs, this is what you made:

No. 12 Egg balls.

Boil four or five new-laid eggs for ten or twelve minutes, and lay them into fresh water until they are cold. Take out the yolks, and pound them smoothly with the beaten yolk of one raw egg, or more, if required; add a little salt and cayenne, roll the mixture into balls the size of marbles, and boil them for two minutes. Half a teaspoonful of flour is sometimes worked up with the eggs.

From ”366 menus and 1200 recipes of the Baron Brisse”, first published in France in 1868, this is from the English translation, 1896.

Eggs with Pistachio Nuts.

Take a little fine white flour, stir for a few minutes into cream, flavour with grated lemon peel, sugar, and pounded pistachio nuts; add six fresh eggs, stir over the fire for five minutes, pour into a plated dish, and bake in a slow oven; continue stirring until the eggs are cooked, sprinkle with powdered sugar, and brown with the salamander.

[i'm not sure if this is would be like a pistachio custard or a sweetish omelette, but it certainly sounds different!]

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is a great savory egg custard that Koreans make/serve as a side dish. I'll fix this tonight and post the pictorial guid in here later.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always wanted to make Alice B. Toklas' chicken stuffed with golden eggs.

Or how about this idea - eggs stuffed with birds!

From: The lady's companion: or, an infallible guide to the fair sex. Containing, rules, directions, and observations, for their conduct and behaviour ... The second edition. London, 1740

Larks in Shells.

Boil twelve Hen or Duck Eggs soft; take out all the Inside, making a handsome Round at the Top; then fill half the Shells with passed Crumbs, and roast your Larks; put one in every Shell, and fill your Plate with passed Crumbs brown; so serve as Eggs in Shells.

Happy Feasting

Janet (a.k.a The Old Foodie)

My Blog "The Old Foodie" gives you a short food history story each weekday day, always with a historic recipe, and sometimes a historic menu.

My email address is: theoldfoodie@fastmail.fm

Anything is bearable if you can make a story out of it. N. Scott Momaday

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's a recipe for "Birdie Bread" by June DiCiocco of Hideaway Farms in South Carolina that incorporates eggs, shells and all:

1 cup whole wheat flour

1 cup yellow corn meal

2 tsp baking power

3/4 tsp salt

½ tsp baking soda

1 Tbs sugar

2 eggs with shells

3 Tbs oil

1 cup buttermilk

Grease an 8" square pan

Mix dry ingredients

Wash eggs then pulverize in blender

Mix in oil and buttermilk, then mix in dry ingredients

Bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees.

Cool and cut into small squares

Freeze for storage

Optional Additions include Fruits, veggies, peppers, nuts, seeds etc.

This is the only recipe I've seen, aside from my Sister's recipe for Dog Brownies, that makes use of calcium rich egg shell.

SB :raz:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's Fannie Farmer's recipe for Boiled Coffee, which uses an egg.

Many Old-Timers around here, especially of Scandinavian stock, threw their egg shells into the coffee grounds when they boiled coffee. Then they just kept adding water and grounds.

The egg shell supposedly helped neutralize the acid in the coffee.

SB (likes strong coffee, but .... :raz: )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For zpzjessica...

Savoury Egg Custard (Korean recipe).

You will need:

A stone pot or heavy bottom sauce pan.

gallery_48583_4079_150597.jpg

(Pardon the dingy stovetop)...

gallery_48583_4079_148593.jpg

Three basic ingedients: 2 eggs, 1/4 cup of water and salt.

gallery_48583_4079_82130.jpg

Let's start, in a large bowl, crack the eggs and add the water.

gallery_48583_4079_72738.jpg

Whisk thoroughly...

gallery_48583_4079_29757.jpg

Add a pinch or two of salt.

gallery_48583_4079_207131.jpg

Pour into the stone pot and set the heat to medium.

gallery_48583_4079_106604.jpg

Let the mixture set for about a minute or two and then give a stir. In fact, give it several stirs every 10 seconds.

gallery_48583_4079_70708.jpg

When the middle of the custard is set, it is ready to be served.

gallery_48583_4079_68941.jpg

There, you got a side dish as easy as pie.

Edited by Domestic Goddess (log)

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Japanese chawan mushi

Steamed savoury custard made of egg and dashi. Usually contains of chicken, prawns, gingko nuts, kamaboko, yurine and mitsuba, and is steamed in special china cups with lids. Well-liked by all.

主泡一杯邀西方. 馥郁幽香而湧.三焦回转沁心房

"Inhale the aroma before tasting and drinking, savour the goodness from the heart "

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In Japan, we have onsen tamago (yolk being harder than white), like this, which is kind to hard to make.  You may need to make some experiments before you can get it right.

Thank Hiroyuki, I like the Onsen Tamago recipe but the ratio for dashi, mirin and soya sauce is not stated, you have any idea?

主泡一杯邀西方. 馥郁幽香而湧.三焦回转沁心房

"Inhale the aroma before tasting and drinking, savour the goodness from the heart "

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In Japan, we have onsen tamago (yolk being harder than white), like this, which is kind to hard to make.  You may need to make some experiments before you can get it right.

Thank Hiroyuki, I like the Onsen Tamago recipe but the ratio for dashi, mirin and soya sauce is not stated, you have any idea?

No, so I did some googling. One site suggests a dashi, mirin, and soy sauce ratio of 6:1:1. Others simply say to pour some 'men tsuyu' (noodle soup) concentrate. You can also simply pour some soy sauce only.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...