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Molecular Gastronomy & Modernist Technique

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Molecular Gastronomy. You have no one else to thank but Marcel "Scarface" V. from top chef 2 for my interest in cooking, whatsoever. Ideally, what I am searching for is like a website, or a book with examples of application of some chemicals & mixtures that will help me get my feet wet without having to jump to deep into chemistry & theory. This is my first real stab at cooking, where it's easy for me to make a knife pun, or some sort of culinary pun, i'm going to refrain. I just found out cooking is fun.

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You know, I am not into this MG at all but Bryanz is, and he seems to enjoy

IDEAS IN FOOD

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The first book to read is "McGee on Food and Cooking: An Encyclopedia of Kitchen Science, History and Culture" by Harold McGee

This gives you the science of what happens molecularly when you cook. You won't take it all in but it will change the way you cook.

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Hi all,

Can someone recommend a good book for learning to use chemicals in cooking (e.g. the sodium alginate + calcium chloride technique), and other modern techniques in cooking today. I don't want to spend as much as I would on the elbulli book, so a £20 limit is preferable, but if you know something good above it, then ok.

Thanks all

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I don't want to spend as much as I would on the elbulli book, so a £20 limit is preferable, but if you know something good above it, then ok.

I would invest the money to learn from the master. Also you could look on www.amazon.uk for books.

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There aren't any cookbook specifically for modern cooking. With that said, there are lots of food technology books that are useful. These can be very expensive too, however.

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If you're just trying to learn some of the basics and play with some of the ideas, you can find lots of information online with a little effort. There are tons of blogs out there on the subject, many with step by step instructions and discussions about any difficulties found along the way. The spherification stuff is actually pretty easy with all the information that's available about it. Lots of very curious people worked on figuring it out so the learning curve was practically eliminated by the time I got around to trying it. Find one of the online pages with the technique explained using the peas, that one isn't troublesome because the peas work as is without having to worry about PH levels. After you see that it's not all that scary, go to town on everything you can think of. That's what I did anyway but take that advice for what it's worth because I'm no expert on the stuff.

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Could you possibly give the addresses of some of the blogs and websites etc. So far i've found ideas in food, curious cook and blog.khymos.org .

Thanks

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Could you possibly give the addresses of some of the blogs and websites etc. So far i've found ideas in food, curious cook and blog.khymos.org .

Thanks

starchefs.com has Ferran Adria Recipes, do a search with molecular gastronomy, you'll find a bunch of sites. You can't find it all online, so I agree, buy the book. It's a good investment.

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I'd start with McGee On food and cooking - not a cook book as such but nearly all the modern techniques build on the information found in this book.

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Could you possibly give the addresses of some of the blogs and websites etc. So far i've found ideas in food, curious cook and blog.khymos.org .

Thanks

You might also find Hungry in Hogtown interesting and useful.

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