• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Megan Blocker

eG Foodblog: Megan Blocker - Trading Pumas for Uggs

211 posts in this topic

All right, kids.  I'm off to grab some breakfast at Cafe Sabarsky and then downtown to do some shopping.  I'll see you back here in the early evening, armed with D&Co photos and a full Degustation report!

OMG you are going to make me wait all day for the D&Co photos!!!! mean, mean blogger :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
All right, kids.  I'm off to grab some breakfast at Cafe Sabarsky and then downtown to do some shopping.  I'll see you back here in the early evening, armed with D&Co photos and a full Degustation report!

OMG you are going to make me wait all day for the D&Co photos!!!! mean, mean blogger :wink:

Wendy, I decided I just couldn't do that to you! Well, really, it's just too freaking cold to wander around window-shopping till my 3 PM appointment in SoHo, so I came home after an early lunch at Cafe Sabarsky.

First off, I should tell you that dinner at Momofuku was really, really good...I wanted to get the report up this morning and didn't spend a huge amount of time on commentary, but you should know that the food and the service were both top-notch, and it's a really good deal (had we eaten like human beings, rather than food-happy bloggers, dinner probably would have been around $60/person).

We walked the eight blocks or so over to Death and Company...eight cooooold blocks, and, remember - I'm a native New Englander. I have cred. :wink:

We were really lucky at D&Co - it was crowded when we arrived, but one of the booth/alcoves was available. It was a tight squeeze, but thanks to a little stool under the coat rack, we managed to fit all six of us around the table. And we got our own chandelier for our trouble!

gallery_26775_2587_13581.jpg

We ordered quite a round of drinks...of course, it was dark, so these are a little fuzzy. However, I'm sure you'll get the idea of how fabulous they were...

For me, a Fancy Free:

gallery_26775_2587_13707.jpg

For Don, a blueberry creation (made with my favorite - Bonne Maman jam) that the bartenders have been playing with.

gallery_26775_2587_5660.jpg

I can't remember is Eunice or Connie ordered this - it's one of the virgin cocktails, the pineapple daiquiri!

gallery_26775_2587_10612.jpg

Either Eunice or Connie again, this time with the hot buttered rum...so rich and creamy.

gallery_26775_2587_2308.jpg

Doug had a glass of Scotch, and Gerald, the sazerac!

gallery_26775_2587_16966.jpg

All in all, not a bad run!


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My goal was to get to Cafe Sabarsky early this morning for a Viennese breakfast. However, I didn't climb into bed until about 2 AM last night, and why on earth would I take a day off work and then not get any sleep??!?! :wink: So I decided to go for an early lunch instead.

I took the bus across a very cold, windy East 86th Street, and arrived at the Neue Galerie, in which Cafe Sabarsky is housed. It's right on the corner of 5th and 86th; you look out on Central Park from the Cafe's dining room.

gallery_26775_2587_7675.jpg

gallery_26775_2587_3179.jpg

I was seated at a table right next to the dessert display (evil, evil people!), and ordered the spaetzle with corn, peas and tarragon for my lunch. While I waited, I made a grocery list (I know some of you love seeing handwriting, so...this one's for you!).

gallery_26775_2587_31551.jpg

The atmosphere at Cafe Sabarsky is uncannily European. It smells like a cafe - that smell of food overtaken by the smell of strong coffee. It sounds like a cafe - scraping chairs, dishes and cups clanging on the marble tables, people talking and flipping through newspapers. And it looks like a cafe - waiters in long aprons and black waistcoats bustling here, there and everywhere, single diners reading at their tables in between sips of espresso. It really transported me back to my week in Prague. :biggrin:

The spaetzle arrived and was perfect - creamy and bright, warm and satisfying - I didn't want soup, but this was a great, weather-appropriate substitute.

gallery_26775_2587_8975.jpg

Then, of course, I HAD to get dessert! I decided to go with the Klimttorte, a hazelnut and chocolate cake. I also ordered a Kaiser melange, fresh brewed coffee with whipped cream on top.

gallery_26775_2587_31597.jpg

The cake was delicious - very rich, and slightly drier and crumblier in the typical fashion of Viennese pastries. Sometimes I find that texture off-putting, but in this case, it worked really well.

I walked home and am now snuggled in a blanket, where I shall remain until it's time to leave for my hair appointment at 3:00! Sigh.


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was at a wedding - probably the best one I've been to other than my own (yeah I'm biased, but the food was good) - where on the way between the church and the reception (in the Natural History Museum in London, seated around the dinosaur), we all sipped bottles of Pop in the coach!

Pommery is fabulous...we had a very interesting tour of their caves, and we learned that, after France, the UK is their biggest market. For some reason, they haven't had that kind of popularity in the U.S., but hopefully that will change...

Your weather looks just like it was when I went to NY a couple of years ago.  Central park was pretty, but the rest... damn cold.  And a downpour on the 3rd day after the snow, so that the puddles were a mixture of slush and rainwater, and you couldn't tell where the sidewalk ended.  Oh god it was cold.

Yup, February in New York can be pretty brutal, kind of like the other side of Fortune's wheel from August, which is brutal in its own sweaty, smelly ways. But it's worth it. :smile:


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tomorrow promises to be an excellent day...lunch will be light, thanks to tonight's meal and also to tomorrow night's.  I'm meeting a few other foodie types for the Bo Ssam at Momofuku Ssam Bar!  So don't go too far if you want details...

Yeah!!!! :biggrin:

ETA: Oops that was me (Henry). Someone keeps logging in from my computer :hmmm:

I did it for you, Henry. :wink:


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...

For Don, a blueberry creation (made with my favorite - Bonne Maman jam) that the bartenders have been playing with.

gallery_26775_2587_5660.jpg

...

This is actually a cocktail that Johnder has been working on. He had brought in the jam earlier last night to get feed back form the bartenders and try it with the Los Amates Mescals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...

For Don, a blueberry creation (made with my favorite - Bonne Maman jam) that the bartenders have been playing with.

gallery_26775_2587_5660.jpg

...

This is actually a cocktail that Johnder has been working on. He had brought in the jam earlier last night to get feed back form the bartenders and try it with the Los Amates Mescals.

Go John! Sorry, I thought they'd been developing it for John...it has inspired me, I want to work on it too...though I may have to add cinnamon, since I love love love cinnamon with blueberry.


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still dreaming of that Bo Ssam from last night. Lucky for donbert and me, we have leftovers to indulge on. mmm.

We did much better than I thought we would, given 2 people didn't even really eat meat, though I'm sure that whole butt has converted them both to the world of swine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm still dreaming of that Bo Ssam from last night.  Lucky for donbert and me, we have leftovers to indulge on.  mmm.

We did much better than I thought we would, given 2 people didn't even really eat meat, though I'm sure that whole butt has converted them both to the world of swine.

I KNEW we could get you to post! :wink:

Mmmmm...porky pork pork. Swine, indeed.


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Megan, where are you going in Chinatown to eat? Have you given it any thoughts? Do tell!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So Megan, where are you going in Chinatown to eat?  Have you given it any thoughts?  Do tell!

Chinatown was supposed to be today, but I just didn't have time (or stomach capacity - this week has been a lot more food than I eat on a regular basis)...we'll see what happens tomorrow, since tonight is already planned (Degustation)!


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...

For Don, a blueberry creation (made with my favorite - Bonne Maman jam) that the bartenders have been playing with.

gallery_26775_2587_5660.jpg

...

This is actually a cocktail that Johnder has been working on. He had brought in the jam earlier last night to get feed back form the bartenders and try it with the Los Amates Mescals.

Go John! Sorry, I thought they'd been developing it for John...it has inspired me, I want to work on it too...though I may have to add cinnamon, since I love love love cinnamon with blueberry.

Lol! I posted the recipe as it stands now here.

I am really digging the mescal/rye combo. And after having 3 of them last night, I am happy to report no ill side affects.

John


John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tomorrow promises to be an excellent day...lunch will be light, thanks to tonight's meal and also to tomorrow night's.  I'm meeting a few other foodie types for the Bo Ssam at Momofuku Ssam Bar!  So don't go too far if you want details...

Yeah!!!! :biggrin:

ETA: Oops that was me (Henry). Someone keeps logging in from my computer :hmmm:

I did it for you, Henry. :wink:

You're awesome Megan!

Having experienced Momofuku with the Donbert myself, I know what an incredible experience you must have had. Thanks for sharing it with us. Was it crowded? Having read the New York Mag article, I was a bit worried about the demise of Momofuku Ssam. But I feel that the cream always rises to the top and was not overly concerened. What were your favorites. I still contend that the 3 terrine bahn mi is the best sandwich I have ever had. How juicy was the Bershire Pork Butt? Did you ask how they cooked it? How many hours?

thanks Megan!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...

For Don, a blueberry creation (made with my favorite - Bonne Maman jam) that the bartenders have been playing with.

gallery_26775_2587_5660.jpg

...

This is actually a cocktail that Johnder has been working on. He had brought in the jam earlier last night to get feed back form the bartenders and try it with the Los Amates Mescals.

Go John! Sorry, I thought they'd been developing it for John...it has inspired me, I want to work on it too...though I may have to add cinnamon, since I love love love cinnamon with blueberry.

right on!! thanks so much Megan! but now I need more commentary on D&Co please. did you like the place? who was bartending when you were there? what didn't you like about it?? what is the vibe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the handwriting sample, Megan, although your list is not the kind of daily list I did (I don't note any references to paintbrushes or drywalling).

Jane Austen. Sigh. I had the good fortune in college to take a course (senior seminar) devoted solely to her works, and the prof who taught the class could have been Jane herself. I recently replaced my nightstand with a bookshelf, and her books sit proudly there, along with a boatload of cookbooks.

So, let's get to that blueberry cocktail. We will head north for a Big Birthday for me this summer, and it will be blueberry season. Tell me more, and what you would change about it (except the pinch of cinnamon).

Luscious looking dinner last night. My next butt will be paired with oysters. Can you tell me more about the flavour of the pork and the rub?


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I imagine that in the course of your jam-packed life (kinda rivals my own), you overlooked this post, but I am curious to know whether the Pommery of the champagne is the same Pommery that produces the coarse-grained mustard.

You may also share your opinion of Clueless if you wish, but that's purely optional.


Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the handwriting sample, Megan, although your list is not the kind of daily list I did (I don't note any references to paintbrushes or drywalling).

Jane Austen.  Sigh.  I had the good fortune in college to take a course (senior seminar) devoted solely to her works, and the prof who taught the class could have been Jane herself.  I recently replaced my nightstand with a bookshelf, and her books sit proudly there, along with a boatload of cookbooks.

So, let's get to that blueberry cocktail.  We will head north for a Big Birthday for me this summer, and it will be blueberry season.  Tell me more, and what you would change about it (except the pinch of cinnamon).

Luscious looking dinner last night.  My next butt will be paired with oysters.  Can you tell me more about the flavour of the pork and the rub?

We-ell, if I had to put bets on it, I'd say the rub was pepper, salt, some star anise, and maybe some cloves...Don may have more insights. It also seemed to be crisped slightly and then roasted/braised for a long time on low heat...I think they use convection/steam ovens, so they can probably do it in half the time it would take me in my little conventional oven.

Blueberry cocktail...John's recipe calls for some ingredients that are not readily available in the Blocker household...I might modify it to Bourbon instead of rye, a bit more lemon, and a touch of cinnamon. Perhaps not as sophisticated, but mighty good. With fresh blueberries, the added sweet smokiness of the bourbon would be welcome, I think!


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Megan, does that butt roast seem like something we could copy at home?  It's really a nice idea, wrapping it up with an oyster.  Any idea of the recipe?

Hey, Abra!

Check out my most recent post in reply to Snowangel...I think it's definitely at least somewhat replicable...the oysters we had were awfully salty and briny...slightly rounder flavor would not be a bad thing, IMO.


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tomorrow promises to be an excellent day...lunch will be light, thanks to tonight's meal and also to tomorrow night's.  I'm meeting a few other foodie types for the Bo Ssam at Momofuku Ssam Bar!  So don't go too far if you want details...

Yeah!!!! :biggrin:

ETA: Oops that was me (Henry). Someone keeps logging in from my computer :hmmm:

I did it for you, Henry. :wink:

You're awesome Megan!

Having experienced Momofuku with the Donbert myself, I know what an incredible experience you must have had. Thanks for sharing it with us. Was it crowded? Having read the New York Mag article, I was a bit worried about the demise of Momofuku Ssam. But I feel that the cream always rises to the top and was not overly concerened. What were your favorites. I still contend that the 3 terrine bahn mi is the best sandwich I have ever had. How juicy was the Bershire Pork Butt? Did you ask how they cooked it? How many hours?

thanks Megan!

It was not too crowded...plenty of spaces at the bar all night (we left around 9:30 or 10:00). The butt was super-tender, though I don't know if I'd call it juicy, per se. It was falling apart and flavorful, but not oozing. That said, there was a nice pool of fat on the bottom of the plate by the time we were done. Oh, my.


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I imagine that in the course of your jam-packed life (kinda rivals my own), you overlooked this post, but I am curious to know whether the Pommery of the champagne is the same Pommery that produces the coarse-grained mustard.

You may also share your opinion of Clueless if you wish, but that's purely optional.

As far as I know, Sandy, the Pommery's of the mustard are separate from the Pommery's of the champagne...though I could certainly be wrong. I know the famed Louise Pommery married into the name and convinced the family to stay in the wine business after her husband's death...

Clueless: best film adaptation of Emma in existence - true to the themes and characters of the original, and you actually like the central character, as opposed to in the Gwyneth Paltrow version. Plus, you know, lots of interesting food at the drive for the hurricane victims (gotta keep it food-related, folks. :wink:).


Edited by Megan Blocker (log)

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, just back from a fabulous evening...Degustation, Room4Dessert, and Temple Bar, all with Daniel and the lovely Alicia. I will post more in the morning, once my coffee is brewing. For now, bonne nuit, mes amis.


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night, I went to Degustation with Daniel and Alicia...we met up at 8:00 for our 8:00 reservation, and waited about 10 or 15 minutes to be seated. This happened the last time I was at Degustation (toward August, I think), and I'm disappointed that they haven't worked the kinks out yet. That said, they were very gracious about the whole thing.

Chloe works the whole 16-seat bar, and knows everything there is to know about the food and the wines that work best with it. She told us about the specials, took our drink order, and left us to debate the menu. Daniel and I started with Black Velvets, Guinness with Cava - I really liked them, sort of the flavor of Guinness without the heaviness.

gallery_26775_2587_11248.jpg

Alicia went with a classic Kir Royale.

gallery_26775_2587_16807.jpg

For our first course, we shared the croquetas, which remain one of my favorite things on the menu. Corn, bacon, creaminess...the mayo they're served with is quite onion-y, as Daniel pointed out, and is a nice, sharp counterpoint to the rich croquettes.

gallery_26775_2587_24753.jpg

I had the tortillas, which are soft and wrapped around a quail egg and some shallot confit, topped with a slice pickled jalapeno...these, too, play nicely on the contrast of rich flavors with the pungent, tangy pepper.

gallery_26775_2587_7230.jpg

Alicia had the long-poached egg (45 minutes at 63 Celsius, according to Chloe), served with smoked cheese foam, ham, and a crispy asparagus stalk. The play of textures here is great...everyone I know who's tried this one has loved it.

gallery_26775_2587_13001.jpg

Daniel, being a wild and crazy guy, went for the salad - beets with arugula, I believe!

gallery_26775_2587_191081.jpg

For the middle course, Alicia and I both had the sweetbreads, served crispy with dill yogurt sauce...these were really fresh, with a bit of cilantro on the plate, too.

gallery_26775_2587_22424.jpg

Daniel had the squid, and I tried it for the first time. Loved it! It's rich and meaty, and it brings life to the lentils...

gallery_26775_2587_250646.jpg

Finally, course three. I had the crispy pork belly, another perennial favorite...it's served with more of the pickled jalapeno, a sherry vinegar reduction, and some pickled scallions....ooooh, I love the balance of fatty and pungent here...

gallery_26775_2587_20463.jpg

Alicia had the suckling pig special, which was rich, tender and oh-so-porky.

gallery_26775_2587_19960.jpg

Daniel went for the other special, a lamb loin with beet sauce, and a hash brown with a poached quail egg. This was wonderful - it tasted of lamb mixed with essence of bacon...

gallery_26775_2587_194461.jpg

It was a fabulous meal, and when it was over, we headed out, into a cab, and over to Room4Dessert!


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, it looks like the Chinatown wish is coming true! I'm about to walk out of the house to head down to Bayard Street, where I'll be meeting a few other eGulleters at Yeah Shanghai...full report this afternoon, along with the end of last night's festivities (and D&Co. commentary, Ms. Foodie!)


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After dinner at Degustation, we decided to hit Room 4 Dessert for (what elese) dessert! We were seated in the middle of the bar, and Mia and Will took good care of us. I started with the whisky coca glass, which had a vanilla cream, whisky caviar, caramel popcorn/crackerjack and cola sorbet...so tasty, and such neat texture combinations.

gallery_26775_2587_19417.jpg

Alicia had the chocububbles, with warm chocolate mousse, apricot, and some cocoa crispies.

gallery_26775_2587_125439.jpg

Dan had the white chocolate margarita, with tarragon yogurt...

gallery_26775_2587_38733.jpg

For our tastings, Alicia had the voyage to India (!), which I somehow managed to miss out on photographing! :sad: Dan had the infance, which was so much fun...cotton candy, sponge cookie, marshmallows...

gallery_26775_2587_39974.jpg

I had the plat du jour, a nutella-themed dessert, with homemade chocolate hazelnut spread, brioche, a lemon cloud with crispies, and a ridiculously tasty ice cream, all boozy and good.

gallery_26775_2587_16820.jpg

We had some cocktails, too...the La Fleur (gin, rose water, and maybe lemon?) was really good...it tasted like drinking roses, but in a good, gentler way.

After that, we headed to Pravda for some vodka, but it was so crowded that we couldn't even stomach getting past the coat check. We turned tail and popped into Temple Bar for a quick one with some of Dan's friends, and ended up with saketinis...look at all the cucumber! :biggrin: One long ribbon of cuke in each glass (sort of - some were stubbier than others). Some popcorn on the side...

gallery_26775_2587_15037.jpg

gallery_26775_2587_28273.jpg

All in all, a good, long night...I'm still recovering! Lunch today helped a lot...am preparing a full report as the blog's grand finale...I think lunch in Chinatown is a good segue into our other ongoing blog! :biggrin:


Edited by Megan Blocker (log)

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By Ian Dao
      Hi everyone, 
       
      Recently, I just found this paradise for Foodie and it is my pleasure to be here. My name is Ian and I am from Salzburg. I love to eat but have to hold myself back before I could roll faster than walk. Last month, I started my own food blog (mostly about restaurant, travel and stories). Reasons I want to be here are to improve my knowledge about food/wine and to learn more how to describe ingredients around me. 
       
      Thank you and have a great week =D 
       
      Guten Hunger (German)
      Mahlzeit (Austrian) 
      --> Enjoy your meal =D 
       
      www.iandao.com
    • By sartoric
      We're 50 something Aussies who enjoy travelling, eating, cooking, markets, kitchen shops, cooking utensils, animals & plants (often food related), architecture & photography (both kitchens and food) and exploring different cultures (of which food is a big part). The trip was January 14 - February 6, it was just marvellous. My favourite meal is now masala dosa with sambar, I had many. Here's some highlights of the food.
       
      A late afternoon snack of Sichuan pepper squid was washed down with a beer at the Ajantha Seaview Hotel on the promenade in Pondicherry. It's a colonial building with a first floor terrace overlooking the colourful display of women in their finest, and the Bay of Bengal. We're here on a Monday public holiday for the Pongal festival, a four day celebration of the harvest, with many different ceremonies and traditions.
       
       

       
      A visual bonus, cows (and sometimes goats) get their horns painted and wear flower garlands or other decorations.

       
    • By Christy Martino
      Ciao!
       
      I'm Christine and I'm a born and bred New Yorker. I’m an Italian by blood (and at heart, of course) since my parents actually came from Italy. My father was from Sciacca, Sicily while my mother was from Sondrio, Lombardy. Despite coming from different regions, or because of it, love for food and cooking has been one of the mainstays in my family home life growing up. And I’ve always loved the dishes my parents prepared during special occasions, and even on regular days.
       
      And of course, I love cooking (and eating) Italian food and I have a few recipes from my mother, but I'd really love to collect some more, especially the traditional ones. And if anyone can contribute some historical background to each dish, that would be really great.
       
      Grazie mille!
    • By Chef Margie
      Hello Everyone!
       
      Happy to join eGullet in hopes to share my passion for culinary and kitchen with others. I have an Instagram account, but I don't think that is enough as I want to learn more, expand, and share my love for food with individuals who share the same passion.
       
      Here is a brief bio about myself: Born and raised in Los Angeles, CA by my Filipino parents. Having no brothers and sisters, I am very independent and surprisingly social with others but also love spending time on my own and with my boyfriend Louis, who is my kitchen partner in crime (this is how we actually met, working BOH at a local Vietnamese restaurant in LA). Having attended college majoring in accounting as an undergrad and grad, I orignally wanted to become a licensed accountant for finance and real estate, but it was not fulfilling and the content honestly bored me to death! I also desired to leave the corporate business world and join the professional kitchen. So I took the leap, graduated culinary school, quit my desk job, and worked in the professional kitchen. Then my health and finances took over, and I had surgery and I needed more money to survive in a city of ridiculous rent prices. I had to leave the kitchen and go back into accounting. Fast forward to 2017, I am currently unemployed having been laid off two days before Christmas the prior year! Using this as a sign and as an opportunity for self growth and realization, I am once again on the culinary path. Not necessarily to work on the line, but to learn more, cook and bake more at home, and expose myself out there to all things food and kitchen. Not also forgetting to mention I am always surrounded by food: Louis is also still in the professional kitchen, and we WILL have that restaurant one day (dreams DO come true, I just know it!).
       
      Anyhow, I am super excited to be posting here and exchanging ideas! See you out there! 
       
      Margie
    • By ElsieD
      We are at the airport waiting to board our flight.  As we seem to have interested folks from different parts of the world who may not know too much about our province,  I thought I would start this blog by giving you an overview of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL).
       
      Before Newfoundland  became part of Canada in 1949, it was a British Colony.  Cupids, a town on Conception Bay, was settled 406 years ago, and is the oldest continuously settled official British community in Canada.  Most of the early permanent settlers came from southwest England and southeast Ireland although  the French also settled here and in the 17th century Newfoundland was more French than English.  French is still spoken in Port au Port Penninsula, on the western side of the island, with English spoken everywhere else.   Just off the coast of south west Newfoundland, St. Pierre et Miquelon are islands that are still a colony of France.  There is a regular ferry service between Fortune, NL and St. Pierre et Miquelon.
       
      Geographically, the capital of St. John's is on the same latitude as Paris, France and Seattle, Washington.  In size, Newfoundland and Labrador is a little smaller than California, slightly bigger than Japan and twice the size of the United Kingdon.  NL covers 405,212 sq. kilometers (156,453 sq. miles) with over 29,000 kilometers (18,000 miles) of coastline.  By itself, the island of Newfoundland covers 111,390 square kilometers (43,008 sq. miles).
       
      The population of NL is 510,000, of whom 181,000 live in St. John's.  While there are some larger towns, vast areas are sparsely populated.
       
      In Newfoundland there are no snakes, skunks, racoons, poisonous insects or arachnids.  There is also no ragweed - allergy sufferers rejoice!  There are over 120,000 moose and it is home to one of the world's biggest caribou herds.   They also have some of the continent's biggest black bears.
       
      Note: This information was taken from the official Newfoundland and Labrador web site.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.