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Megan Blocker

eG Foodblog: Megan Blocker - Trading Pumas for Uggs

211 posts in this topic

Tea with lemon has been consumed, throat is wrapped in a big scarf (a trick from my days as a singer back in high school and college), and I am off to bed for some healing/preventative slumber.

See you in the morning! On tap tomorrow, I'm headed to Rockefeller Center for my India inoculations, so we'll probably grab lunch over that way. What's a good lunch for a sore arm (FIVE shots!!!!)?


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Tea with lemon has been consumed, throat is wrapped in a big scarf (a trick from my days as a singer back in high school and college), and I am off to bed for some healing/preventative slumber.

I hope your throat feels better. What is it with bloggers and sore throats lately?

See you in the morning!  On tap tomorrow, I'm headed to Rockefeller Center for my India inoculations, so we'll probably grab lunch over that way.  What's a good lunch for a sore arm (FIVE shots!!!!)?

A shot for each shot? :wink: What makes you think the five innoculations will be in your arm? :shock:

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i'm not megan, but i used to live near her and the only surviving german restaurant which is near schaller & weber is 'heidelberg'...not great, but the servers wear dirndles and lederhosen!

i also know the history of why there were so many germans living in yorkville, but i'll save that for another time, sandy :smile:

I walked up to the laundromat and threw in two loads; while they dried, I walked over to Midnight Express, a diner on the corner of 89th and 2nd.

When you mentioned Schaller and Weber upthread, I was going to ask whether you lived in Yorkville.

This post answers that question.

I had a friend of German descent who lived at 151 East 83d; I've fallen out of touch with him. He did take me to a German restaurant on 86th Street one evening back around 1980 whose name I've long since forgotten. Perhaps you could rattle off a few names on the off chance that one of them might trigger a reaction?

New York rents and rent control being what they are, I suspect he may still be living at 151 East 83d. Maybe I should see if I can track him down.

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Tea with lemon has been consumed, throat is wrapped in a big scarf (a trick from my days as a singer back in high school and college), and I am off to bed for some healing/preventative slumber.

See you in the morning!  On tap tomorrow, I'm headed to Rockefeller Center for my India inoculations, so we'll probably grab lunch over that way.  What's a good lunch for a sore arm (FIVE shots!!!!)?

Ouch! I didn't know that scarfs helped sore throats, although I always do it out of comfort. I think most of the Northeast has some type of illness now, thanks to the temperature drop.

A good lunch for a sore arm (and throat?)-- probably soup and a glass of wine! :raz:

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i'm not megan, but i used to live near her and the only surviving german restaurant which is near schaller & weber is 'heidelberg'...not great, but the servers wear dirndles and lederhosen!

Alanamoana is totally my Yorkville pinch-hitter...yes, the restaurant at 85th and 2nd is called Heidelberg, and it's still there. We also have a Hungarian place, Andre's Cafe, and, of course, Schaller and Weber. I believe there are some German bakeries on some of the side streets in the low 80's/high 70's between 1st and 2nd...


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Tea with lemon has been consumed, throat is wrapped in a big scarf (a trick from my days as a singer back in high school and college), and I am off to bed for some healing/preventative slumber.

See you in the morning!  On tap tomorrow, I'm headed to Rockefeller Center for my India inoculations, so we'll probably grab lunch over that way.  What's a good lunch for a sore arm (FIVE shots!!!!)?

Ouch! I didn't know that scarfs helped sore throats, although I always do it out of comfort. I think most of the Northeast has some type of illness now, thanks to the temperature drop.

A good lunch for a sore arm (and throat?)-- probably soup and a glass of wine! :raz:

When I wrap it around my throat and then a bit over the mouth, it helps keep the whole system warm...don't know if it really does anything toward fending off sickness, but it does keep things a bit more limber, and it definitely helps me feel better.


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Ouch! I didn't know that scarfs helped sore throats, although I always do it out of comfort. I think most of the Northeast has some type of illness now, thanks to the temperature drop.

A good lunch for a sore arm (and throat?)-- probably soup and a glass of wine! :raz:

Preferably the wine before the shots. It'll numb the pain. :laugh:

I heard somewhere that silk is good for a sore throat. Probably an old wives tale, but they're purty anyway.


Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

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Am now off to get a cup of coffee with my colleague...no, not from anywhere exciting, just trotting down to the kitchen. I feel guilty that there aren't any culinary delights to savor right now, but my workdays are pretty mundane, food-wise.

For your perusal, to keep you amused until I do something worth reading about (!) here are a few of the places I'll be visiting later in the week...

- The Modern (Bar Room)

- Degustation

- Etats-Unis


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Wow, those restaurants sound awesome.  Especially the last one with their crab souffle, that sounds to die for.  Do you typically go to those types of restaurants on a regular basis in a regular week?

Usually at least one...though, to be fair, the menu shown for Etats-Unis is the restaurant menu, which is a fair bit pricier than the smaller-plate menu at their wine bar (which is across the street - they run the plates over 81st Street, and wine goes the other direction when ordered in the restaurant), which is where I'm planning on eating this week. You can get the full restaurant menu or the bar menu, which is fantastic.

I actually get to visit The Modern a fair bit, since it's so close to my office. It's a great, moderately-priced place to suggest to vendors (I get taken out a lot for my work), and, even better, it's somewhere I actually want to eat.


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Hey, all!

Well, I managed to survive my "travel consultation" - five shots and one anti-malaria prescription later, I headed out to find sustenance (before those vaccination side effects like low-grade fever and fatigue set in). I took a short walk back through Rockefeller Center, shaking off the soreness in my arm and generally enjoying the above-freezing temperatures.

I really love Rock Center...it's mobbed during the holidays, but it's pretty ok the rest of the year, foot-traffic-wise, and it's such a gorgeous, majestic group of buildings. I love Art Deco, and the murals and sculpture in and around the buildings are breathtaking and, in many cases, awe-inspiring. I also really like how the elaborate artwork contrasts with the very reserved design of the buildings themselves, so tall and straight and clean.

gallery_26775_2587_31834.jpg

In summer, the rink turns into an outdoor bar. (Named, oh-so-cleverly, RinkBar.)

Since I was in Rockefeller Center, and since I wanted soup, I decided to head for Dean & Deluca - they always have a good selection, and I rarely eat there, because it's usually so crowded. It was nice and quiet today! You may recognize its windows...they figure heavily in crowd shots on the Today Show, since the store is right across the path from Studio 1A...

gallery_26775_2587_18348.jpg

They've managed to cram a lot into a small space...a big candy rack, a salad bar...everything is pre-prepared (not made to order), but the sandwiches are still pretty good. I thought about the salad bar...

gallery_26775_2587_43.jpg

But decided to go for a cup of soup and half a sandwich. I wound up with a vegetarian pasta fagiole soup and half a roast beef sandwich, topped with horesradish mayo, lettuce and tomato. (Pics of these soon!)

Then it was on to the desserts...they always have a very tempting assortment, brought in from bakeries around the city, including Sage and Balthazar. How pretty are these tarts?

gallery_26775_2587_15144.jpg

gallery_26775_2587_25572.jpg

I did get a dessert...but more on that later!


Edited by Megan Blocker (log)

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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As for India - no, you haven't missed!  I am headed there for a week, flying out on March 1st.  I'm going for work, and I'll be in Mumbai and Bangalore.  We're flying through London, and I'll be staying there for three nights on the way back.  It should be a pretty amazing trip.  I've never been to Asia before, and I'm really looking forward to it.

There are egulleteers in London, you know...

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As for India - no, you haven't missed!  I am headed there for a week, flying out on March 1st.  I'm going for work, and I'll be in Mumbai and Bangalore.  We're flying through London, and I'll be staying there for three nights on the way back.  It should be a pretty amazing trip.  I've never been to Asia before, and I'm really looking forward to it.

There are egulleteers in London, you know...

I know it! I'll be posting for advice once things calm down (read: blog is over)...not even sure yet where we're staying!


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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I really love Rock Center...it's mobbed during the holidays, but it's pretty ok the rest of the year, foot-traffic-wise, and it's such a gorgeous, majestic group of buildings.  I love Art Deco, and the murals and sculpture in and around the buildings are breathtaking and, in many cases, awe-inspiring.

You know the story behind the mural in the lobby of 30 Rock, right?

It's a replacement for what was to have been the original work.


Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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I really love Rock Center...it's mobbed during the holidays, but it's pretty ok the rest of the year, foot-traffic-wise, and it's such a gorgeous, majestic group of buildings.  I love Art Deco, and the murals and sculpture in and around the buildings are breathtaking and, in many cases, awe-inspiring.

You know the story behind the mural in the lobby of 30 Rock, right?

It's a replacement for what was to have been the original work.

Yes, it was originally conceived and worked on by Diego Rivera, who painted in Communist figures and themes (those of you who have seen Cradle Will Rock will recognize the story), thereby angering Nelson Rockefeller, who had the mural painted over. Here's some info from Wikipedia:

Diego is perhaps best known by the public world for his 1933 mural, "Man at the Crossroads," in the lobby of the RCA Building at Rockefeller Center. When his patron Nelson Rockefeller discovered that the mural included a portrait of Lenin and other communist imagery, he fired Rivera, and the unfinished work was eventually destroyed by Rockefeller's staff. The film Cradle Will Rock includes a dramatization of the controversy.

Edited by Megan Blocker (log)

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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OK, lunch!

As mentioned above, I decided on soup and sandwich at Dean and Deluca...the soup (pasta fagiole) was thick and rich, with lots and lots of beans, and just a little pasta. The sandwich was tasty - the roast beef was nice and rare, and didn't have that cold cut, plasticky flavor to it.

gallery_26775_2587_50818.jpg

For dessert, I treated myself to an apple galette from Balthazar...I mean, it's fruit, right? It was wonderful...the crust was light and flaky, and the apples were tender and sweet. Hard to mess up, I suppose. :raz:

gallery_26775_2587_15593.jpg

Now I'm on Diet Coke #1 and headed to a 3:00 meeting...


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Megan, I am sure it was not intentional, but you've just contributed something to this month's regional cooking thread in the Italian forum since your soup is associated with the Veneto.

Do you have any good cart food in either of your neighborhoods? Last time I was at the Modern, no one was to be found, though one of my friends said it's the favored spot of one of the majors.


"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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Megan, onion roll, right? What was that lovely confection to the left of the fruit tart?

Do you have any good cart food in either of your neighborhoods?  Last time I was at the Modern, no one was to be found, though one of my friends said it's the favored spot of one of the majors.

No food carts around the Modern? Hmm...hen was the last time you were there? Every time I go by, right across the street I see your standard hot dog, pretzel, and coffee carts, plus carts that sells empanadas and Middle Eastern food. There might also be a crepe cart, but I don't remember.


Edited by I_call_the_duck (log)

Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

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Megan, I'm loving these photos of the city, it feels like I'm right there. I've been in that Dean and Deluca so many times. Keep 'em coming. That apple galette looks really tasty. I hope the shots don't bug you too much. I've been there. Also good luck remembering to take your malaria pills every week.

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If I were in NYC for a solo V-Day, I'd have to consider Twisted Burger's Breakup Burger with garlic mayo (although I realize you're not a cheese person):

"The Breakup Burger, as you may or may not know, is about a third of a pound of grilled ground beef dressed up with a ripe slab of Limburger cheese and a pile of chopped raw onion."

mem


Edited by markemorse (log)

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If I were in NYC for a solo V-Day, I'd have to consider Twisted Burger's Breakup Burger with garlic mayo (although I realize you're not a cheese person):

"The Breakup Burger, as you may or may not know, is about a third of a pound of grilled ground beef dressed up with a ripe slab of Limburger cheese and a pile of chopped raw onion."

mem

Oh my god - that's amazing!!!

Megan, onion roll, right? What was that lovely confection to the left of the fruit tart?

Yes, onion roll indeed. In fact, with the onion roll and the horseradish, it was quite a stinky sandwich. Not quite as stinky as the Breakup Burger, however.

Do you have any good cart food in either of your neighborhoods? Last time I was at the Modern, no one was to be found, though one of my friends said it's the favored spot of one of the majors.

Yes, we have quite a few carts. Sixth Avenue in the 50's (and the 50's between 5th and 6th Avenues) are lunch cart hotspots...I know Alanamoana has some preferences. I have to admit I generally frequent the carts on Park, which are not as good, but are a wee bit closer and more convenient to my ATM (I am constantly low on cash, since I hate carrying a lot of money around).


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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I'm running out the door for dinner, and I'm very excited...when he saw that I had nothing planned for tonight, Daniel (and the lovely Alicia) invited me over for dinner! I am headed to their place now...can't wait to report back on what I'm sure will be a fabulous meal.

See you soon!


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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I'm green with envy about your dinner at Daniel's. Can't wait to hear about it. :wub:


Edited by monavano (log)

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WOW, right when I read where you were going for dinner I thought "no way - lucky chick". Daniel posts the most wonderful meals....pasta's, meat variety that seem to go on and on, desserts, sides...that boy could make cardboard, glue and sawdust taste like perfectly seared duck with the most delicious glaze atop a rissoto!!

Jealous eyes cannot wait to see picts...I am crossing my fingers and praying to the higher-ups that you took a LOT of picts - as are all of my jealous fellow readers!


"One Hundred Years From Now It Will Not Matter What My Bank Account Was, What Kind of House I lived in, or What Kind of Car I Drove, But the World May Be A Better Place Because I Was Important in the Life of A Child."

LIFES PHILOSOPHY: Love, Live, Laugh

hmmm - as it appears if you are eating good food with the ones you love you will be living life to its fullest, surely laughing and smiling throughout!!!

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