Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Adventures in Starting a Chocolate Business


Recommended Posts

Another question.

When you get the health inspection at the kitchen, do they want to check your recipes to see if they match your ingredients labels?

Also anyother usefull tips to get ready for the Health inspector?

Like do you bring all the stuff you are going to use during production or just the basic to show the inspector and also do they ask you to make something while the inspection? Haha I dont perform well with people looking at me LOL.

Thank you so much for all your help!!! :wub:

Vanessa

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I had my inspection, the only thing she really cared about was that I knew how to set up and test the sanitizing sink for dishwashing. She looked at my labels and made some comments, but that was pretty much it. YMMV, of course, as every state and every inspector is different.

I didn't have to demonstrate any production. i store my equipment the kitchen i use, so she may have looked at that a little bit, but it wasn't a big deal.

Good luck!

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Vanessa,

Just thought I'd chip in with my recent experience (New York State). We rent a kitchen and cart everything we use back and forth each time we do production. Our inspector was keen to understand every phase of the process - ingredients (we nearly came to blows over my ganache recipe!), how we'd store and transport our ingredients and equipment, what tools we'd be using, what we'd be storing the marshmallow in to transport it to the company where we have it enrobed, how long it'd be stored and where, where and how our excess inventory would be stored, how and where we'd do packaging, what our labels and bags looked like and were made of, when we'd be producing - I forget what else, but he was thorough to say the least.

He said he was not as hard on us as he is on some - apparently he regards chocolate as a potentially hazardous product due to the working temperature range. I can't quite figure that one out...

I brought labels, bags, and the cambro pans we use for storage/transport, and seeing those seemed to satisfy him.

I suspect you know an awful lot more about chocolate and confectionery than any inspector - just rely on your knowledge, careful processes and terrific work and you'll do fine!

Patty

Link to post
Share on other sites

Patty , Thank you so much for sharing your experience!

I figured they would want to know all those things, expecially when they dont have too much experience in the confectionery chocolate field.I suspect they will want us to follow the same rules as a meat processing company :laugh:

I will reread all the code I have downloaded and have all the packaging labels and containers ready, also my recipes book is been completed and I will have a copy for him/her to check.I need to get some more containers ( I guess they need to be commercial grade right) .I dont know if I wan to store my stuff in the kitchen.For now it will be jusy me but you know.I think I will be carry my stuff in big containers and do what you do now.

Thank you again very much

Vanessa

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

thought I would chime in. I usually have to do a big yearly inspection and then one every 6 months to get updated info or review things with the inspector. I have had two different inspectors in the last year, so then I have to do a big inspection again.

The yearly inspection involves the inspector watching me while I actually work. She usually talks or asks questions while I am working. Pretty much a check list is followed for little things like hand washing, gloves, temperatures, etc. My kitchen is inspected once a month, so she doesnt focus on equipment or the surroundings as much as she does on my process.

I too tote everything back and forth in containers. I do have to buy ingredients and bring them in sealed. i.e., no used home kitchen ingredients.

She does look at the labeling and packaging.

And finally storage of the finished product. I am in my kitchen twice monthly and then deliver the day after production, so she seemed ok with this. But long term storage, I would need to rent space in the kitchen.

I think if you go in prepared you will be fine!

Goodluck!

Link to post
Share on other sites
gallery_11197_5584_41525.jpg

gallery_11197_5584_85238.jpg

Thank you very much for posting the pictures.

I have a question, how does the bottom part gets enrobed?

The grid rack that the enrobed chocolates sit on - are they stainless steel?

Doesn't the bottom enrobed part stick to it?

I do a lot of enrobing, but with cookies. I dip them piece by piece by hand. And it's an extremely time-consuming process. I would love to be able to just arrange the cookies on a grid of some kind and immerse a whole batch in chocolate and presto! Enrobed cookies.

The way I do them right now is to use a dipping fork, and then tap the excess chocolate and let them set on wax paper.

I tried to just dip them (no tapping to save time) and set them on a cooling rack to let the chocolate drain off but the dipped cookies stuck to the rack. :wacko:

Or is there a special rack for chocolates that won't make them stick?

gallery_17803_917_71186.jpg

I am not very particular about 'feet' because they'll end up in mini paper cups anyways so teeny tiny feets are ok. :biggrin:

gallery_17803_917_24954.jpg

p.s. sorry, i don't know why my pics are so small. i'll try to figure out how to size it here. :unsure:

p.p.s. ok, now they're too big. LOL!

Edited by JustKay (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you very much for posting the pictures.

I have a question, how does the bottom part gets enrobed?

The grid rack that the enrobed chocolates sit on - are they stainless steel?

Doesn't the bottom enrobed part stick to it?

I do a lot of enrobing, but with cookies. I dip them piece by piece by hand. And it's an extremely time-consuming process. I would love to be able to just arrange the cookies on a grid of some kind and immerse a whole batch in chocolate and presto! Enrobed cookies.

The way I do them right now is to use a dipping fork, and then tap the excess chocolate and let them set on wax paper.

I tried to just dip them (no tapping to save time) and set them on a cooling rack to let the chocolate drain off but the dipped cookies stuck to the rack.  :wacko:

Or is there a special rack for chocolates that won't make them stick? 

gallery_34671_3115_5348.jpg

As you can see in this picture - the chocolates 'march' off the chain onto a wax paper sheet. The bottoms get dipped in the process. You do actually bottom the ganache with chocolate before putting them through the enrober to prevent them from sticking to the chain.

It is a stainless chain.

Dipping racks won't work as you and I both have found out the hard way (picture a couple of dozen truffle mice growing though the bottom of a rack).

Your dipping looks excellent actually - so I'd keep doing it that way until you are ready to invest in an enrober.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. How come I missed that picture you posted?! :rolleyes: I was wondering how it got to the wax paper. :raz:

So, the ganache has to be bottom-coated with chocolate before putting on the chain, eh?

Yeah, I guess I can dip them fine the way I do it now (and thanks for saying 'excellent' :biggrin: ) but when I have like 10,000 cookies to dip in a month I go :wacko: It's only that high a number during the festive season though but still, with the baking and making other cookies too ... like I said I go :wacko: :wacko:

I don't think I'll ever be able to invest in an enrober. I'm just a home baker.

Edited by JustKay (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks. How come I missed that picture you posted?!  :rolleyes: I was wondering how it got to the wax paper.  :raz:

So, the ganache has to be bottom-coated with chocolate before putting on the chain, eh?

Yeah, I guess I can dip them fine the way I do it now (and thanks for saying 'excellent'  :biggrin: ) but when I have like 10,000 cookies to dip in a month I go  :wacko:  It's only that high a number during the festive season though but still, with the baking and making other cookies too ...  like I said I go  :wacko: :wacko: 

I don't think I'll ever be able to invest in an enrober. I'm just a home baker.

10,000 cookies in a month? Sounds like you're more than "just a home baker"!! :shock::biggrin:

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been hoping that someone would come out with an enrober small enough and inexpensive enough for a 'home' business. I was searching last night actually and there are a couple of units that might be small (hard to tell from the pictures) but no idea of the prices on them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10,000 cookies in a month? Sounds like you're more than "just a home baker"!! :shock:  :biggrin:

:laugh: Didn't I say that only happens during the festive season? The Eid, actually.

Eid = a Muslim celebration after the fasting month.

Hi! Your cookies look devine! I love the the little cup color combo with the cookies and Pistachios? They are very attractive! And yes, 10,000? At home? To me they look perfect. Send one!

Thank you. Yeah, I call them Pistachio Dreams. Pistachio cookies with a whole pistachio center, enrobed in white chocolate and sprinkled with ground pistachio and some gold dust.

I make several types of enrobed cookies. I've added molded chocolates and truffles last season and I hope to add a couple more 'new' treats this year. I also hope to be able to get hired help for those busy months.

During the off-season, I sell cakes and desserts.

I work from home. In my country, we don't need to get license for small home-based business like this. :biggrin:

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been hoping that someone would come out with an enrober small enough and inexpensive enough for a 'home' business.  I was searching last night actually and there are a couple of units that might be small (hard to tell from the pictures) but no idea of the prices on them.

Which units are you referring too?

Mark

www.roseconfections.com

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been hoping that someone would come out with an enrober small enough and inexpensive enough for a 'home' business.  I was searching last night actually and there are a couple of units that might be small (hard to tell from the pictures) but no idea of the prices on them.

Yes! I keep searching for one.

I wish there is a way to rig something up ... like using a chocolate fountain ... but how to get something to rest the chocolate on without them being stuck? Maybe if they make silicone or waxed grid racks.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been hoping that someone would come out with an enrober small enough and inexpensive enough for a 'home' business.  I was searching last night actually and there are a couple of units that might be small (hard to tell from the pictures) but no idea of the prices on them.

Yes! I keep searching for one.

I wish there is a way to rig something up ... like using a chocolate fountain ... but how to get something to rest the chocolate on without them being stuck? Maybe if they make silicone or waxed grid racks.

The problem would be the pieces resting on the grid and the bottoming chocolate between the grid locking it in place. That would happen no matter what the material it was constructed of. The answer would be to make a chain grid like an enrober that you could turn to get the pieces off.

If you go that far, though it isn't all that much further to building a small pump and creating a small hand cranked enrober...

I wonder just how difficult it would be to build an enrober "head" that would sit on and use a 6Kg Mol'dArt melter. I examined the enrober at the FPS and the mechanics are really rather simple. In essence it's just a pump pouring chocolate over a curving metal band to form a double curtain of chocolate over a powered chain belt. The back part of the belt has a vibrator to knock off excess chocolate, but that shouldn't be difficult to include. Oh, and a hot air blower to keep everything warm, but that isn't a deal breaker either.

The continuous tempering machine it sits on is what makes it expensive, but I wonder if it couldn't just be replaced with a large pool of tempered chocolate in a melter. One would have to temper it to start and keep and eye on it, but for the length of time it would take to enrobe a few hundred pieces it shouldn't be a huge problem.

Can anyone tell me why I'm deluded and should give up on the idea?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Never give up on an idea. The world is full of people who say you can't do it - that is until someone proves them wrong and does it. Then those are the people who say 'i thought of that first!' 8-)

I think it's a wonderful idea. An after market 'insert' that fits into a little dipper, or a mol d'art as an add on is a great idea.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Never give up on an idea.  The world is full of people who say you can't do it - that is until someone proves them wrong and does it.  Then those are the people who say 'i thought of that first!' 8-)

I think it's a wonderful idea.  An after market 'insert' that fits into a little dipper, or a mol d'art as an add on is a great idea.

I don't know that I'll go into business making them, but I could possibly do for enrobing what I did for the preceding process. I've already documented an inexpensive design for a home built guitar cutter in another thread. An inexpensive enrober head for a melter would be a logical next step.

I like the idea of using a chocolate fountain for the pump. Would that work with normal chocolate (not thinned to death with vegetable oil)? Or are there simpler pumps that won't be destroyed if it sets up?

Link to post
Share on other sites

i have to say that even the selmi doesnt deliver a really "perfect" bottom. thats why we bottom every piece beforehand. the bottom gets pretty good though if you find a good cooperation between speed, de-tailing wave and "tapping device" (forgive me, but i really don know the correct terms).

you really have to "play around" a lot...

cheers

t.

p.s. considering the price this machine is still very very much worth the money. in the end you can always buy a sollich for 4x the price. ;-)

Edited by schneich (log)

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

Link to post
Share on other sites
Which units are you referring too?

A couple I was looking at are this one - the Nielson Baby Flex and this little Chocoma.

This little Sollich minicoater caught my eye as well.

Then there is the little Dedy machine.

Then there is this little Italian machine.

The problem would be the pieces resting on the grid and the bottoming chocolate between the grid locking it in place.  That would happen no matter what the material it was constructed of.  The answer would be to make a chain grid like an enrober that you could turn to get the pieces off.

If you go that far, though it isn't all that much further to building a small pump and creating a small hand cranked enrober...

I wonder just how difficult it would be to build an enrober "head" that would sit on and use a 6Kg Mol'dArt melter.  I examined the enrober at the FPS and the mechanics are really rather simple.  In essence it's just a pump pouring chocolate over a curving metal band to form a double curtain of chocolate over a powered chain belt.  The back part of the belt has a vibrator to knock off excess chocolate, but that shouldn't be difficult to include.  Oh, and a hot air blower to keep everything warm, but that isn't a deal breaker either.

The continuous tempering machine it sits on is what makes it expensive, but I wonder if it couldn't just be replaced with a large pool of tempered chocolate in a melter.  One would have to temper it to start and keep and eye on it, but for the length of time it would take to enrobe a few hundred pieces it shouldn't be a huge problem.

Can anyone tell me why I'm deluded and should give up on the idea?

Not deluded at all. I know that my husband could build something like this with no problem at all, but since I'm 7 years into the basement renovation with no end in sight, I know this isn't going to happen. Let us see your design as it develops - OK?

I did find a website last night where you can buy the stainless chains for your unit once you get it built. Here you go.

One other thought - is there some other product out there, perhaps used for another purpose that could be adapted.

Link to post
Share on other sites
That's quite a list of small enrobers.  What is the price of the least expensive one?

Thanks for the link for the wire belts.

I have no idea of the cost on any of them actually.

Link to post
Share on other sites
That's quite a list of small enrobers.  What is the price of the least expensive one?

Thanks for the link for the wire belts.

I have no idea of the cost on any of them actually.

I found the following for enrobers, http://www.probake.com/chocolate.htm

They range from $10,000 and up.

I think we used the the following at The French Pastry School

http://www.pcb-creation.fr/2k3/novachoc_uk/tempereuses.htm

I'm sure this one is probably $40,000 or more. If I remember right, the instructions were in French.

Angela

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm in the middle of starting my business and buying chocolate polycarbonate molds.  I'm having a hard time finding a Cocoa Pod mold.  Anyone know where I can get 2 or 3 of these.

Thanks,

Angela

Try choclat - chocolat, I ve seen them there before.

Mark

www.roseconfections.com

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      MILLET GROATS CHOCOLATE CREME WITH CRANBERRY MOUSSE
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for the best chocolate crème I have ever eaten. It is thick, smooth and very chocolaty in flavour and colour. Despite the chocolate, the dessert isn't too sweet. But if somebody thinks that it is, I recommend serving it with slightly sour fruit mousse. You can use cherries, currants or cranberries. You will make an unusually yummy arrangement and your dessert will look beautiful.

      My children were delighted with this dessert. I told them about the fact it had been made with millet groats after they had eaten it, and ... they didn't believe me. Next time I will prepare the millet groats crème with a double portion of ingredients.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      chocolate crème
      100g of millet groats
      200g of dark chocolate
      1 tablespoon of dark cocoa
      250ml of almond milk
      fruit mousse
      250g of fresh cranberries
      juice and peel of one orange
      half a teaspoon of grated ginger
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Boil the millet groats in salty water and drain them. Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie. Blend the millet groats, chocolate, cocoa and milk very thoroughly until you have very smooth crème. Pour the milk in gradually to make the right consistency of your desert. Prepare the fruit mousse. Put the washed cranberries, ginger, juice orange peel and sugar into a pot. Boil until the fruits are soft. Blend. Put the chocolate crème into some small bowls. Put the fruit mousse on top. Decorate with peppermint leaves. Serve at once or chilled.

      Enjoy your meal!


    • By Lisa Shock
      The basic formula for these cakes was developed by the wife of a mayonnaise salesman in an effort to help him out. I did a bit of research, and have found many variations. Early variants generally involve using less cocoa, which I cannot recommend. Later variants involve using cold water instead of boiling, adding salt, and additional leaveners. I personally do not feel that any additional salt is needed, as mayonnaise and that famous, tangy brand of salad dressing (sometimes the label just says 'Dressing') both contain a fair amount of salt. If you are using homemade mayonnaise or a low sodium product, an eighth teaspoon of salt may boost the flavor a bit. And, of course, somewhere along the way fans who prefer a certain salad dressing over mayonnaise started using it to make this cake. Nowadays, the Hellman's website has a different formula -one with added eggs and baking powder. I have not tried this newer formulation.
       
      Some versions of this recipe specify sifted cake flour. This will result in a very light cake with virtually no structural integrity, due to the paucity of eggs in this recipe compared to a regular cake. Cupcakes made this way give beautifully light results. However, every time I try to make a traditional 8" double layer cake with cake flour, I experience collapse. I recommend AP flour or at least a mix of cake and pastry flour.
       
      I have never made this with a gluten-free flour replacer. This recipe does not have very much structural integrity and as such does not make a good candidate for a gluten-free cake.
       
      I have made this cake many times, the type of sandwich spread you choose will affect the outcome. Made with mayonnaise, the cake has a good chocolate flavor and moistness. Made with that famous, tangy, off-white salad dressing that gets used as a sandwich spread, the cake has a subtle bit of extra brightness to the flavor. If one chooses to use a vegan mayonnaise, the result is tasty but lacking a little in structure; I would bake this in a square pan and frost and serve from the pan.
       
      The cocoa you use will also affect the flavor.  For a classic, homey flavor use a supermarket brand of cocoa. To add a little sophistication, use better, artisan type cocoa and use chocolate extract instead of the vanilla extract.
       
      Supposedly, the traditional frosting for this cake should have a caramel flavor. Look for one where you actually caramelize some sugar first. Modern recipes for the icing seem like weak imitations to me; using brown sugar as the main flavor instead of true caramel.
       
      Chocolate Mayonnaise or Salad Dressing Cake
      makes enough for two 8" round pans, or a 9" square (about 7 cups of batter)
       
      2 ounces/56g unsweetened, non-alkalized cocoa
      1 cup/236g boiling water
      1 teaspoon/4g regular strength vanilla extract
      3/4 cup/162g mayonnaise, vegan mayonnaise, or salad dressing (the tangy, off-white, sandwich spread type dressing)
      10.5ounces/300g all-purpose flour
      7 ounces/200g sugar
      0.35ounce/10g baking soda
       
      Preheat your oven to 350°.
      Grease or spray two 8" round pans or an equivalent volume square or rectangle.
      Place the cocoa in a medium (4-5 cup) bowl. Add the hot water and stir with a fork to break up any clumps. Allow to cool down a little,  then add the vanilla extract and the mayonnaise or salad dressing spread. Beat well to eliminate lumps. In the bowl of an electric mixer or larger regular bowl if making by hand, sift in the flour and add the sugar and baking soda. Mix the dry ingredients to distribute evenly. Slowly beat in the cocoa mixture. Mix until the batter has an even color. Pour immediately into the pans. If making two 8" rounds, weigh them to ensure they contain equal amounts.
      Bake for approximately 20 minutes, or until the center of the top springs back when touched lightly. (The toothpick test does NOT work well on this moist cake!) Allow the cake to cool a little and shrink from the sides of the pan before removing. Removal is easier while still a little warm.
      Good with or without frosting.
      Good beginner cake for kids to make.
       
       
       
    • By Kasia
      I prepared two versions: the first one with desiccated coconut and blueberries and the second with dark chocolate and strawberries. Choose your favorite dessert or go crazy and make your own version.

      Bright dessert

      Ingredients (for 2 people)
      200g of white chocolate
      100g of blueberries
      200ml of 30% sweet cream
      200ml of mascarpone cheese
      2 tablespoons of desiccated coconut

      Melt 150g of the white chocolate in a bain-marie. Draw six 8 cm circles on a sheet of baking paper. Put 2-3 tablespoons of chocolate on each of them and smear it around to cover the whole circle. Leave them at room temperature to congeal and then put them in the fridge for 2 hours. Melt the rest of the white chocolate in a bain-marie. Whisk the cream. Add the mascarpone cheese after whisking. Add the white chocolate and the desiccated coconut and stir thoroughly. Wash the blueberries and drain them. Put the first chocolate circles onto a plate, then a layer of the cream and a couple of blueberries and once again chocolate, cream and blueberries. Put the last chocolate circle on the top. 
      Decorate with the rest of the cream, fruit and peppermint leaves. Serve chilled.

      Dark dessert

      Ingredients (for 2 people)
      200g of dark chocolate
      1 tablespoon of cocoa
      a couple of strawberries
      200ml of 30% sweet cream
      200ml of mascarpone cheese

      Melt 150g of the dark chocolate in a bain-marie. Draw six 8cm circles on a sheet of baking paper. Put 2-3 tablespoons of chocolate on each of them and smear it around to cover the whole circle. Leave them at room temperature to congeal and then put them in the fridge for 2 hours. Melt the rest of the dark chocolate in a bain-marie. Whisk the cream. Add the mascarpone cheese after whisking. Add the dark chocolate and the cocoa and stir thoroughly. Wash the strawberries and remove the shanks. Leave 3-4 nice bits of fruit for decoration, and cut the rest into small pieces. Put the first chocolate circles on a plate, then a layer of the cream and a couple of strawberry pieces and then once again chocolate, cream and strawberries. Put the last chocolate circle on the top. Decorate with the rest of the cream, fruit and peppermint leaves. Serve chilled.


    • By Kasia
      Chocolate cake with plums
       
      The first cake I ever dared to bake by myself was a chocolate cake. I have since baked it many times, always using the same recipe, and many times I have spoiled it at the beginning of preparation. It is necessary to cool down the chocolate mixture before adding the rest of the ingredients. On a hot summer day this process is very long, so I accelerated it by putting the pot with the mixture into some cold water in the kitchen sink. Many times, by mistake, I turned on the tap and poured water onto the cooling mixture. In hindsight these situations were amusing, but at the time it wasn't funny.

      This chocolate cake is excellent without any additives. You can enrich it with your favourite nuts or butter icing. Today I added some plums to the top of the cake. It was great and its sweet chocolate-plum aroma lingered long in my home.

      Ingredients (25cm cake tin):
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      3 tablespoons of cocoa
      120g of brown sugar
      15ml of almond milk
      100g of dark chocolate
      1 egg
      1 teaspoon of baking powder
      plums

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Smooth the cake tin with the butter and sprinkle with dark cocoa.
      Put the butter, milk, sugar, cocoa and chocolate into the pan. Heat it until the chocolate is melted and all the ingredients have blended together well. Leave the mixture to cool down. Add the egg, flour and baking soda and mix them in. Put the dough into the cake tin. Wash the plums, cut them in half and remove the stones. Arrange the plum halves skin side down on top of the cake. Bake for 50 minutes. Sprinkle with caster sugar before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By paulraphael
      Brown Butter Muscovado Chocolate Chip Cookies
      Serves 16 as Dessert.
      These are for when you want to savor a cookie with depth, flavor, and a thick and chewy texture. If you just need to pacify the kids or cure some late night munchies, use the recipe on the package of chips. It's cheaper and less trouble!
      Key elements include browned butter, muscovado sugar, and a small portion of whole grain oat flour (which you can make). The method is also important. The butter is melted, not creamed while solid, and the cookies are thoroughly chilled before baking. Oven temperature is also higher than what's typical.
      You'll also notice a relatively low proportion of chocolate chips. Before you accuse me of heresy, allow me to defend this choice. The cookie itself actually tastes good. This is the one dessert I make with chocolate where the chocolate is not the main event. I didn't want huge amounts of chocolate, or intensely flavored dark chocolate, overwhelming the subtle flavors of the cookie. I've had good luck with Ghiradelli semi sweet chips, or coarsely chopped Callebaut 54% block. If you use chopped chocolate, try not to include too much chocolate dust and fine crumbs. They melt into the batter and turn it into something else.
      Recipe makes 16 to 18 big cookies

      227 g (8 oz) unsalted butter
      1.8 g (1/2 tsp) nonfat dry milk (optional)
      240 g (2 cups mnus 3TB) AP flour
      80 g (3/4 cup) whole grain oat flour*
      6 g (1 tsp) salt
      4 g (1 tsp) double acting baking powder
      2 g (1/2 tsp) baking soda
      250 g (1-1/3 cup plus 1TB) light muscovado sugar**
      48 g (1/4 cup) granulated sugar
      1 egg
      1 egg yolk
      55 g (1/4 cup) whole milk
      10 g (2 tsp to 1 TB) vanilla extract
      170 g (1 cup) good quality semisweet chocolate chips

      *Use food processor to mill whole oats (oatmeal) as fine as possible. This will take a few minutes of processing, with a few of pauses to scrape corners of work bowl with a spatula. sift out large grains with medium strainer. store in freezer in an airtight container.
      **If you have to substitute regular light brown sugar or another unrefined sugar, substitute the same volume, not the same weight. Turbinado sugar can substitute for the granulated sugar.
      -Melt butter in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Whisk in nonfat dry milk (if using).
      -While butter is melting, stir together the flours, salt, baking powder, and baking soda and set aside.
      -Measure the sugars into a mixing bowl or a stand mixer's work bowl.
      -Brown the butter: bring to a simmer over medium to medium-low heat. Stir frequently, scraping the bottom, until milk solids brown and liquid butter takes on a rich golden brown color. It may foam up dramatically toward the end. Turn down heat and stir while the foam lightly browns. Don't let the solids turn dark brown or black! Overbrowning will turn the cookies bitter.
      -Immediately pour the melted butter into the bowl with the sugars. Mix on medium speed, until smooth (there may be some unincorporated liquid from the butter). Do not try to incorporate air.
      -Add the egg, yolk, milk, and vanilla extract and mix until well combined. This step can be done with a spoon, or with the mixer on low to medium speed.
      -Slowly incorporate the flour mixture until thoroughly combined. Stir in the chocolate chips. This step can be done with a spoon, or with the mixer's lowest speed.
      -Chill the dough for at least 4 hours (and ideally 12 to 24 hours) in an airtight container. If under 6 hours, spread dough thin against sides of bowl to speed chilling. If over 6 hours, pack dough tightly into the bottom.
      -Heat oven to 375 degrees F. with rack in the middle, or 2 racks in the top third and bottom third.
      -Scoop in round balls onto parchment-lined, room temperature sheet pans (heavy, rimless cookie sheets or upside down half-sheet pans are ideal), 6 cookies per sheet. I like a heaping scoop with a #20 disher: 1/4 cup / 60g - 70g dough per cookie. Chilled dough will be too stiff to form smooth balls, so don't worry if they're mishapen. Alternatively, if you have refrigerator space, you can form the balls before chilling, keeping them covered tightly with plastic wrap.
      -Bake for 14 minutes or until done, checking the cookies after 12 minutes. If necessary, rotate the baking sheets for even browning. If you make smaller cookies, reduce baking time. Keep dough and scoop refrigerated between batches.
      -They're done when they brown around the edges and begin to brown on top. If they cook more than this they'll dry out. Carefully slide parchment/cookies off of hot baking sheet and onto a cool surface (another rimless baking sheet or an upside down half-sheet pan work well) to cool for a couple of minutes. Try not to bump or bend them while transfering; this will cause them to flatten.
      -With a spatula, transfer to cooling racks. Cool thoroughly before storing in an airtight container. Flavor and texture are best after 12 hours. They keep for several days at room temperature if well sealed.
      High Altitude (these adjustments were tested at 6000 feet)
      -Increase flours by 8%
      -Increase milk by 40%
      -reduce sugars by 4%
      -Slightly reduce baking time
      Keywords: Dessert, Cookie, Intermediate, American, Chocolate, Snack
      ( RG2108 )
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...