Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

tammylc

Adventures in Starting a Chocolate Business

Recommended Posts

Prairiegirl!! What lovely news!! It must be such a yay feeling!! I believe a lot of us underestimate ourselves- self confidence or something?? Anyway it sounds really good and I wish you much success and pleasure. Enjoy it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey guys, check this out - our own Lior has a new and extremely professional looking website.

Guess that's the next adventure in starting a chocolate business for some eG chocolatiers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently moved to Rhode Island. I probably will be working for a small chocolate store who wants to bring truffle production in house for the hand made look. I now scoop, roll, lightly coat by hand rolling then hand dip. I have been thinking on ways to increase productivity, I now will have an enrobing machine. I was thinking of using Tomric rubber mats making lots of small discs. Then sticking ganache balls on them & running them through the enrobing machine. Has anyone tried this type of process? or have any other good insights?


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright, Lior! You have a great selection of flavours there. I especially love the look of the double heart with the milk & dark chocolate detailing (bittersweet mark).


I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey guys, check this out - our own Lior has a new and extremely professional looking website.

Guess that's the next adventure in starting a chocolate business for some eG chocolatiers!

Lior,

Your website is very beautiful. The work and the detail that you put in to it is evident.

The chocolates look perfect.

I have been reading about your preparation and learning both here and on ecole chocolat.

You are incredible and a role model for me.

Carol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I recently moved to Rhode Island. I probably will be working for a small chocolate store who wants to bring truffle production in house for the hand made look. I now scoop, roll, lightly coat by hand rolling then hand dip. I have been thinking on ways to increase productivity, I now will have an enrobing machine. I was thinking of using Tomric rubber mats making lots of small discs. Then sticking ganache balls on them & running them through the enrobing machine. Has anyone tried this type of process? or have any other good insights?

One of the problems with running truffles though an enrober is the tendency for them to stop at the little bar that sweeps the excess chocolate off the bottom and start to roll. Then the next bunch runs into the first bunch...

One option is to prebottom them by dipping each in chocolate. I suspect your little discs might work the same way. I don't know what brand of enrober you are using, but I notice that the Selmi has a truffle grill attachment, which avoids that problem.

Speaking of enrobers I notice there is a 10 inch Hillard enrober available on e-bay right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I recently moved to Rhode Island. I probably will be working for a small chocolate store who wants to bring truffle production in house for the hand made look. I now scoop, roll, lightly coat by hand rolling then hand dip. I have been thinking on ways to increase productivity, I now will have an enrobing machine. I was thinking of using Tomric rubber mats making lots of small discs. Then sticking ganache balls on them & running them through the enrobing machine. Has anyone tried this type of process? or have any other good insights?

One of the problems with running truffles though an enrober is the tendency for them to stop at the little bar that sweeps the excess chocolate off the bottom and start to roll. Then the next bunch runs into the first bunch...

One option is to prebottom them by dipping each in chocolate. I suspect your little discs might work the same way. I don't know what brand of enrober you are using, but I notice that the Selmi has a truffle grill attachment, which avoids that problem.

Speaking of enrobers I notice there is a 10 inch Hillard enrober available on e-bay right now.

The enrober is an older Hillard.


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lior,

I love the teddy bear in your childrens section.

Is it a solid piece or a bonbon?

Where did you get the mold?

Thanks,

Carol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi. Yes it is solid- all those kiddies ones are solid. I often decorate him with buttons with the tip of a paint brush dipped in a different chocolate color and I put a drop in each ear- it adds a lot! Well Ilovekids so I have fun with this!- I'll see if I have a photo. I got all these kiddie ones from ipfco in India, and they were kind enough to allow me to use some of their pictures. I don't know about where you are, but here it is more expensive than ordering from India and paying shipping. They also did my logo mold for me- oh and the kiddie molds are pvc and so is my logo. www.ipfco.com. Arun is the guy you need-he is great.


Edited by Lior (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New eG member here.

I have just finished reading the 9 pages of this thread and am exhausted just reading it. What energy!! I really do admire those of you with the courage to start out in this business. If I were 30 years younger....????

One thing apparent is that American laws on setting up a food business seem much more stringent that Ontario laws for sure. Our public health inspectors ask for far less than yours do. I think. I could be wrong.

The eG forums are amazing! I had never heard the term 'keystone' before...thanks for the meaning...and have still to find out what the BNI is and also what are 'ballotins' and 'Cambro' pans. Don't be concerned...I'll look them up.

Good to know that caramels, praline pretzels and marshmallows are less heat sensitive...My son lives in Nova Scotia and I live in Ontario and I want to be able to mail him some chocolate confections in the winter.

And what about those bacon marshmallows that Kerry suggested????


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One thing apparent is that American laws on setting up a food business seem much more stringent that Ontario laws for sure.  Our public health inspectors ask for far less than yours do.  I think.  I could be wrong.

Welcome Darienne! Just wanted to let you know that here in BC the laws are pretty strict so it sounds like it's a province by province and state by state situation.


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a wonderful website. All the pastries are soooooo beautiful. Thanks for sharing!


check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have got to check out this website. It's our own Sote23.

I've been going back over the old P&B threads for lack of new posts on eG lately and came across one from not that long ago where Luis asked "do I really need to temper chocolate?" He's obviously taken all the advice to heart and learned a ton - and just look at this gorgeous website.

So Luis - how do you make the pattern on the top of the chocolate you show in your wedding page?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, those are all so gorgeous! I'm interested to hear how that pattern was made too. If I had to guess, I'd think it was airbrushed on with a stencil after the chocolate had set. How about the Pineapple? Is that a transfer sheet or did you just drizzle a chocolate pattern on them?

(...I'm still looking through the site)


I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By pastrygirl
      Anyone have a favorite recipe for chocolate cake using semisweet chocolate?  My usual chocolate cake recipe uses cocoa, but I have some samples of chocolate I want to use up for a workplace party.  Yes, I could make brownies or ganache frosting, or chocolate mousse or chocolate chunk cookies, just feeling like cake this weekend ...
    • By Beckykp27
      I'm trying to make bonbons with milk shells for the first time and I'm struggling. When I melt my milk chocolate it is really thick. Is this normal? I'm pretty sure humidity is not an issue. I'm concerned that my shells wont empty out well and I'll be left with no room for ganache. I tried adding some cocoa butter last time but it affected the flavor. 
       
      Disclaimer: I'm using pretty cheap milk chocolate (Ghirardelli) cuz I'm still learning. If you think this is the only issue please let me know.
    • By Ciordia9
      We work with transfer sheets regularly but most of them are not double backed. By that I mean most of them are one layer, not backed with a white layer. I'm having a real problem with consistency in the thicker sheets as seen attached. We attach these individually as they come out of the enrober but it doesn't feel like we're getting enough heat penetration to do a full transfer.
       
      Anyone share some tips on thicker applications like these? Our short run came out fine but as soon as we went into production of course the first batch ends up being shot.

    • By cslas
      So a question about guitar cutters. I can see why they're a superior method for cutting ganache in terms of uniformity and efficiency, but I was wondering if there's something about cutting with a metal string that's superior to cutting with a knife? Perhaps a ganache would stick to the string less than the knife? Where I'm headed with this is, as someone who's just starting out and not ready to invest in a guitar cutter, I'm wondering if using a cheese lyre to cut ganache might be better than using a knife?
    • By BVWells
      Afternoon everyone. I know that some of you have taken classes with Melissa Coppel and I am finally going to bite the bullet and take one of her classes, but I don't know whether I should take her "Intensive Chocolate Workshop" class or her "Running a Chocolate Production" class. I hear all of her classes are great, but I'm just wondering which one would be better for an amateur home chocolate maker who is pretty confident in his tempering and ganache skills, but is looking to take that next step. Thanks in advance!!
       
      Branden
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...