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sheriffblalock

Cooking with Michel Richard's "Happy in the Kitchen"

65 posts in this topic

Has anyone cooked much with this? I checked it out from the library, and it looks amazing! I don't know that I'll be buying a meat slicer, but a dessert based on a Kit Kat is pretty interesting.

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I have it sitting right here next to me. I bought on a recomendation, just haven't had the chance yet to use it. I am housesitting a couple of weeks for someone who has a really nice kitchen ( gas stove too) so I am planning on taking it with me to try a couple of things. It is a beautiful cookbook and I am so glad that I have it in my collection. The nice thing is, the recipes aren't too difficult if you trust your skills. I am in no way a professional and my skills could be considered intermediate to slightly advanced,maybe. There are things, like the tater tots, that I am really eager to try.

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I made the All Crust Gratin from it last night. It was great. There are quite a few things I want to make from this book.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Would this be a fun and good cookbook from which to cook with my kids (keep in mind that my kids are not kitchen novices)?


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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Particularly since your kids aren't novices, I think it would be a great book to cook from with them. Michel certainly likes to use various kitchen gadets and he likes to have fun doing it.


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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yeah, anyone who has places like Home Depot and dremmel drills in their list of sources in a cookbook clearly likes to have fun in the kitchen, and I am not talking renovations here.:smile:

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So it's been another month or so. Has anyone else been using this book? I'm reading great reviews elsewhere.

I spent a few hours (really) reading it at a local bookstore... what an amazing book. It's definitelly on my "to get" list.

I certainly do not have all the gadgets used by Michel but I like the "play with your food" undertones.

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I made the potato, mushroom and bacon stew and it came out really well, it was so good! I had just gotten some new knives so I was looking forward to using them on a really good recipe and this does not disappoint. It was so easy to use. Really love it! :smile:


Edited by kristin_71 (log)

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I checked it out of the library and thought it was incredibly fun sounding and interesting, but I really don't think that I would cook much from it - it is a little 'fiddly' for me. But I would love to eat the food that someone else cooked from it :laugh: !

Kim

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I made the potato, mushroom and bacon stew and it came out really well, it was so good! I had just gotten some new knives so I was looking forward to using them on a really good recipe and this does not disappoint. It was so  easy to use. Really love it! :smile:

I am another cook feeling happiest in the kitchen with Michel Richard's fantastic cook book. I think it was the best cookbook in 2006. So many of his dishes are amazing inventions. I immediately bought the Japanese turning slicer. I have been experimenting with it; love my olive oil fried potatoes (using the Japanese slicer) with New Mexican, mild green chile powder.

Since finding this site, I am again trying Richard's recipes. I thought of making the potatoe, mushroom and bacon stew. Knowing that fresh porcini's are a rare late summer or autumn dream, I imagine refreshed dried porcini with fresh mushrooms are a decent compromise. Kristin what did you use. Don't tell me fresh porcini's!

The romaine lettuce recipe looks like a creative gem; have yet to try it. Thanks all for your feedback as I am back to trying his recipes. Judith Gebhart

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I couldn't find porcini so I used some portabella and cremini. I really don't think it matters too much because it came out really well. I used some really good olives from the local Middle Eastern market and some nice potatoes. I was trying to cut the potatoes the way it says in the cookbook, but all I did was peel my skin off my fingers. I'm kidding. I cubed them because peeling them the way it says to seemed like I was wasting a good potato.

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The book is fantastic! I have tried 5 or 6 dishes and everyone turned out great. I agree it is the best cookbook of 2006.

I met Michel in Monterey last month at a cooking demo and after chatting with him about his Jackson Pollock soup recipe, I was inspired to create my "Monet meets Pollock at the Duck Pond" which was a huge hit at my dinner party party last week.

Buy the book!

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The book is fantastic! I have tried 5 or 6 dishes and everyone turned out great. I agree it is the best cookbook of 2006. 

Which recipes have you tried?


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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The book is fantastic! I have tried 5 or 6 dishes and everyone turned out great. I agree it is the best cookbook of 2006. 

Which recipes have you tried?

Wafer-Thin Potato Crisps- I used them for a seared ahi pizza- A bit tricky to get the consistency correct before slicing but I found that if you let them sit in the refrig after taking them out of the freezer mfor about an hour, it helped the slicing process.

Jackson Pollock Soup- I only julienned the vegetables and made a duck consumme for the broth. You must buy the Japanese Benriner to get it right.

Potato Basket- The toughest recipe I tried in the book. Getting the potato strands to stay complete was tough. After a few attempts, I got it right.

Asparagus on Asparagus- I did a combo of green and white asparagus and it came out fantastic. I did add a bit more than a teaspoon of Dijon.

Lamb Loin with basil Brust and Fennel -simple and delicious

Filet Mignon with Simple Syrah Sauce- A bit complicated but was huge hit with my dinner party. I replaced the enoki tempura with chanterelle tempura

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Which recipes have you tried?

I've made (these are descriptions; I don't have the book with the actual names with me):

porcini/potato stew

onion-coated fish with tomato-tofu sauce

fish batons over cucumber slaw

nearly-no-fat sausages (one batch flavored Thai and another as chorizo, but the basic architecture was his)

faux gras

Everything worked well mechanically. All tasted good except the faux gras. It wasn't actually bad, but it was undersalted (which, in my experience, really hurts such dishes), and given the method, it's hard to catch that in time. I've been hugely impressed. I haven't bought the slicer yet, but it's definitely coming.

Andrew


Andrew Riggsby

ariggsby@mail.utexas.edu

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faux gras

Everything worked well mechanically.  All tasted good except the faux gras.  It wasn't actually bad, but it was undersalted (which, in my experience, really hurts such dishes), and given the method, it's hard to catch that in time.

I made the faux gras about a month ago, and it turned out fabulous. I didn't think it was undersalted at all,and I am not shy with salt.

Christine

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Awsome book, I love to try more things from it. So far I've tried the:

Low-Carbonara made with onions instead of noodles

The all crust potato gratin

The Tater tots

All turned out fantastic. Those tater tots especially were gone as fast as I could fry them.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Awsome book, I love to try more things from it. So far I've tried the:

Low-Carbonara made with onions instead of noodles

The all crust potato gratin

The Tater tots

All turned out fantastic. Those tater tots especially were gone as fast as I could fry them.

Thse all sounded good to me. can you tell me more about the onion carbonara? It just sounds so...oniony. :huh:

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Awsome book, I love to try more things from it. So far I've tried the:

Low-Carbonara made with onions instead of noodles

The all crust potato gratin

The Tater tots

All turned out fantastic. Those tater tots especially were gone as fast as I could fry them.

Thse all sounded good to me. can you tell me more about the onion carbonara? It just sounds so...oniony. :huh:

Not at all, it is very delicious. I mean sure it is oniony to a degree, but not pungent in any way actually I have a picture here somewhere...here

gallery_5404_94_332082.jpg

I made it that time as a side dish with chicken. This picture really does not do it justice. The process is pretty simple:

The onions big ones with big diameter are sliced lengthwise through the center on one side only. So the onion is intact but the leaves are all slit on one side. Then the onion is sliced crosswise into 1/4 inch thick slices. This will give you large circles that are cut on one side. Then those large circles are steamed for 20 minutes or so. This makes the circles-turned-strands soft, flexible and very mild. Those are then dressed like a normal carbonara pasta with pancetta, eggs, cheese...

Hope that makes sense.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Elie~

Thanks! That helps a lot :) It looks fabulous.............

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Elie, what's the texture of those onions like? I've never steamed an onion slice for 20 minutes.

Well, to keep the pasta reference going :smile:, I'd say they were nicely al dente. Fully cooked, but not soft or mushy and with a very slight crunch.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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