Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Woods

Finding Rare Cookbooks

Recommended Posts

I am trying to find a copy of Raymond Calvel's Hearth Breads: A French Master's Approach to Using North American Ingredients and having no luck. It was published in 1999 so should be still around. I have tried my ususal book finder sites with no luck. Does anyone have any suggestions? Thank you. Woods

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Professor Cavel's "Taste of Bread" is available, as is the "Bread and Baker" 3 video set (from www.chipsbooks.com)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ISBN is 0412126117

How odd... I wasn't able to find any copies on Alibris, Abebooks, or Bookfinder.com, and they've always come through for me in the past, even on totally obscure titles.

You can set up a pre-order on Half.com, or a Book Fetch on alibris: http://www.alibris.com/bookfetch/home.cfm?...sults*bookfetch

You might try contacting the publisher:

International Thomson Publishing Ltd

168-173 High Holborn

London WC1V 7AA

Tel: 020 7497 1422

Fax: 020 7497 1426

Although I find it odd that a UK publisher would publish a book about North American ingredients, so perhaps that ISBN info isn't right...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you tried www.abe.com? They have a couple thousand book sellers from all over the world. As of Monday afternoon they showed 16 Calvel baking books, though none appear to be the one you're after.

Good luck.

Cheers,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you go to amazon.com, you can set up an order for it, specifying how much you'll pay, etc. If you really want the book, it might be worth your trouble to do that. You never know!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

try ebay....if u find it u may have to bid for it but you might get lucky and find a buy it now price..i suggest them simply because they seem to have lots of cookbooks going..and some people there sell them in lots..in which case you might want to email them to find out if they have a copy

just a thought


Edited by ladyyoung98 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Other sources are Kitchen Arts and Letters in NYC -- 1-212-876-5550 and www.sfbi.com-- The San Francisco Baking Institute.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Professor Cavel's "Taste of Bread" is available, as is the "Bread and Baker" 3 video set (from www.chipsbooks.com)

I do have Le Gout du Pain but most of his other works are out of print. Thanks. By the way, if you can read any French the French edition is 25 euros unlike the rather overpriced English translation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
woods,

i suspect you are talking about the video set

Amazon lists it as a hardback book that is out of print and unavailable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I collect cookbooks. At the moment, I'm trying to find Fernand Point's "MA Gastronomie" (Flammarion, 1969). This is the first edition in French. Not surprisingly, I'm having a hard time of it. I'm particularly interested in first editions, in the original language, which usually means French.

It would be great to put together a list of bookstores that deal in rare/antiquarian cookbooks. Any suggestions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chad is on the right track but a more extensive search engine is Book Finder.com which scans Alibiris, ABEBooks, and a number of additional antiquarian book sites. This has the advantage of being able to filter by language, first edition, and signed copies.

I have conducted and have four listings although they are the 1974 edition (using the First Edition filter).


Edited by Carolyn Tillie (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Along the same lines, Fetchbook has been very helpful to me. As well, eBay can be pretty good to find books... you can enter your criteria and let it search for you. They will send you alerts when something comes up. I was able to get 2 of Notter's books at very sweet prices that way.

Second hand bookstores can be places to make great finds occasionally. I found come good ones in LaSalle area when I was searching a while back.

Also Bonnie Slotnick Cookbooks will be a great place to look. She's in NYC. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried book finder.com and was able to find exactely what I was looking for... Ma Gastronomie (Falmmarion, 1969) in French is on the way from some antiquarian book store in Pensylvania. cool. The book is even signed by Fernand Point's wife. It's supposed to be in excellent condition (fingers crossed). The ability to search explicitly for French language books made all the difference this time around. Thanks for the good advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ABAA (Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America) maybe a useful website for you. The annual book fair is coming to San Francisco next weekend. I've always been able to get some great collectible cookbooks at the fair. You may be able to find some dealers on the website.
Edited by annachan (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is another good link, seems more fosused on American books (though I've only done a few searches so far). My Fernand Point should arrive any day, I will report back when it comes in...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My local library should have a copy of this book, but its been missing, ie stolen.

And, how do you exactly know if something is a first edition? Sometimes, the book will state that its a first edition, but other times it doesn't mention that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Liz Seeber has an excellent book list, I have bought from her in the past and I am sure she ships worldwide.

She is happy for you to give her a 'wanted list'.

Jill


Edited by lapin d'or (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By boilsover
      Solid intermediate cook, here.  Not especially intimidated by elaborate preps.  But I'm new to SV, and would like a recommendation for a cookbook for guidance and exploration.
       
      I was thinking of Tom Keller's Under Pressure, but I'm wondering if the preps he includes may not be the most generally useful.  What do you all like, and why?
       
      Thanks!
    • By Chris Hennes
      On Nov. 7, 2017, Modernist Bread will finally arrive on my doorstep. Having preordered it literally the first day it was available, to say I'm excited about this book is a bit of an understatement. The team at The Cooking Lab have been gracious enough to give @Dave the Cook and me early electronic access to the book and so I've spent the last week pouring over it. I'm just going to start with a few initial comments here (it's 2600 pages long, so a full review is going to take some time, and require a bunch of baking!). Dave and I would also be happy to answer any questions you've got.
       
      One of the main things I've noticed about this book is a change in tone from the original Modernist Cuisine. It comes across as less "everything you know is wrong" and more "eighty bazillion other bakers have contributed to this knowledge and here's our synthesis of it." I don't think it's an exaggeration to say that Myhrvold and company are now the most experienced bread-bakers in the world. Not necessarily in terms of the number of identical loaves they've produced, but in the shear number of different recipes and techniques they've tried and the care with which they've analyzed the results. These volumes are a distillation of 100,000 years of human breadmaking experience, topped off with a dose of the Modernist ethos of taking what we know to the next level.
       
      The recipes include weight, volume, and baker's percentages, and almost all of them can be made by both a home baker and someone baking in a commercial facility. The home baker might need to compromise on shape (e.g. you can't fit a full-length baguette in most home ovens) but the book provides clear instructions for both the amateur and professional. The recipes are almost entirely concentrated in volumes 4 and 5, with very few in the other volumes (in contrast to Modernist Cuisine, where there were many recipes scattered throughout). I can't wait for the physical volumes to arrive so that I can have multiple volumes open at once, the recipes cross-reference techniques taught earlier quite frequently.
    • By Chris Hennes
      I just got a copy of Grace Young's "Stir-Frying to the Sky's Edge"—I enjoyed cooking from "Breath of a Wok" and wanted to continue on that path. Does anyone else have this book? Have you cooked anything from it?

      Here was dinner tonight:

      Spicy Dry-Fried Beef (p. 70)

      I undercooked the beef just a bit due to a waning propane supply (I use an outdoor propane-powered wok burner), but there's nothing to complain about here. It's a relatively mild dish that lets the flavors of the ingredients (and the wok) speak. Overall I liked it, at will probably make it again (hopefully with a full tank of gas).


    • By CanadianSportsman
      Greetings,

      I've cooked several recipes from Keller's "Bouchon" the last couple of weeks, and have loved them all! At the moment (as in right this minute) I'm making the boeuf Bourguignon, and am a little confused about the red wine reduction. After reducing the wine, herbs, and veg for nearly an hour now, I'm nowhere near the consistancy of a glaze that Keller specifies. In fact, it looks mostly like the veg is on the receiving end of most of it. Is this how the recipe is meant to be? Can anybody tell me what kind of yield is expected? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you, kindly. 
    • By Paul Fink
      This unfortunately titled book changed my life. I always enjoyed cooking and idealized Julia Child &
      Jacque Pepin. But I was a typical home cook. I would see a recipe and try to duplicate it little understanding about what I was doing.
       
      Cooking the Nouvelle Cuisine in America talked about a philosophy of cooking. It showed me that there is more depth to cooking. A history. A philosophy.
      The recipes are very approachable and you can make them on a budget from grocery store ingredients. I read it as a grad student in Oregon, in the late 80's I had access to lots of fresh ingredients. And some very nice wines, cheap! I was suppose to be studying physics but I end up learning more about wine & cooking.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×