• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Woods

Finding Rare Cookbooks

22 posts in this topic

I am trying to find a copy of Raymond Calvel's Hearth Breads: A French Master's Approach to Using North American Ingredients and having no luck. It was published in 1999 so should be still around. I have tried my ususal book finder sites with no luck. Does anyone have any suggestions? Thank you. Woods

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Professor Cavel's "Taste of Bread" is available, as is the "Bread and Baker" 3 video set (from www.chipsbooks.com)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ISBN is 0412126117

How odd... I wasn't able to find any copies on Alibris, Abebooks, or Bookfinder.com, and they've always come through for me in the past, even on totally obscure titles.

You can set up a pre-order on Half.com, or a Book Fetch on alibris: http://www.alibris.com/bookfetch/home.cfm?...sults*bookfetch

You might try contacting the publisher:

International Thomson Publishing Ltd

168-173 High Holborn

London WC1V 7AA

Tel: 020 7497 1422

Fax: 020 7497 1426

Although I find it odd that a UK publisher would publish a book about North American ingredients, so perhaps that ISBN info isn't right...


Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you tried www.abe.com? They have a couple thousand book sellers from all over the world. As of Monday afternoon they showed 16 Calvel baking books, though none appear to be the one you're after.

Good luck.

Cheers,


Steve Smith

Glacier Country

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

garden state motorcyle association

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you go to amazon.com, you can set up an order for it, specifying how much you'll pay, etc. If you really want the book, it might be worth your trouble to do that. You never know!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

try ebay....if u find it u may have to bid for it but you might get lucky and find a buy it now price..i suggest them simply because they seem to have lots of cookbooks going..and some people there sell them in lots..in which case you might want to email them to find out if they have a copy

just a thought


Edited by ladyyoung98 (log)

a recipe is merely a suggestion

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Other sources are Kitchen Arts and Letters in NYC -- 1-212-876-5550 and www.sfbi.com-- The San Francisco Baking Institute.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

woods,

i suspect you are talking about the video set

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Professor Cavel's "Taste of Bread" is available, as is the "Bread and Baker" 3 video set (from www.chipsbooks.com)

I do have Le Gout du Pain but most of his other works are out of print. Thanks. By the way, if you can read any French the French edition is 25 euros unlike the rather overpriced English translation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
woods,

i suspect you are talking about the video set

Amazon lists it as a hardback book that is out of print and unavailable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you tried Librarie Gourmande?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I collect cookbooks. At the moment, I'm trying to find Fernand Point's "MA Gastronomie" (Flammarion, 1969). This is the first edition in French. Not surprisingly, I'm having a hard time of it. I'm particularly interested in first editions, in the original language, which usually means French.

It would be great to put together a list of bookstores that deal in rare/antiquarian cookbooks. Any suggestions?


Du beurre ! Donnez-moi du beurre ! Toujours du beurre ! (Fernand Point)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chad is on the right track but a more extensive search engine is Book Finder.com which scans Alibiris, ABEBooks, and a number of additional antiquarian book sites. This has the advantage of being able to filter by language, first edition, and signed copies.

I have conducted and have four listings although they are the 1974 edition (using the First Edition filter).


Edited by Carolyn Tillie (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Along the same lines, Fetchbook has been very helpful to me. As well, eBay can be pretty good to find books... you can enter your criteria and let it search for you. They will send you alerts when something comes up. I was able to get 2 of Notter's books at very sweet prices that way.

Second hand bookstores can be places to make great finds occasionally. I found come good ones in LaSalle area when I was searching a while back.

Also Bonnie Slotnick Cookbooks will be a great place to look. She's in NYC. Good luck.


Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried book finder.com and was able to find exactely what I was looking for... Ma Gastronomie (Falmmarion, 1969) in French is on the way from some antiquarian book store in Pensylvania. cool. The book is even signed by Fernand Point's wife. It's supposed to be in excellent condition (fingers crossed). The ability to search explicitly for French language books made all the difference this time around. Thanks for the good advice.


Du beurre ! Donnez-moi du beurre ! Toujours du beurre ! (Fernand Point)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ABAA (Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America) maybe a useful website for you. The annual book fair is coming to San Francisco next weekend. I've always been able to get some great collectible cookbooks at the fair. You may be able to find some dealers on the website.
Edited by annachan (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is another good link, seems more fosused on American books (though I've only done a few searches so far). My Fernand Point should arrive any day, I will report back when it comes in...


Du beurre ! Donnez-moi du beurre ! Toujours du beurre ! (Fernand Point)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My local library should have a copy of this book, but its been missing, ie stolen.

And, how do you exactly know if something is a first edition? Sometimes, the book will state that its a first edition, but other times it doesn't mention that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a former life I was a food historian. My department had luck with a nice British woman named Liz Seeber: http://www.lizseeberbooks.co.uk/. She might not have it, but may know where to find it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Liz Seeber has an excellent book list, I have bought from her in the past and I am sure she ships worldwide.

She is happy for you to give her a 'wanted list'.

Jill


Edited by lapin d'or (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Lisa Shock
      The team over at Modernist Cuisine announced today that their next project will be an in-depth exploration of bread. I personally am very excited about this, I had been hoping their next project would be in the baking and pastry realm. Additionally, Francisco Migoya will be head chef and Peter Reinhart will assignments editor for this project which is expected to be a multi-volume affair.
    • By Chris Hennes
      While not a new cookbook by any means, I haven't really had time to dig into this one until now. We've previously discussed the recipes in Jerusalem: A Cookbook, but not much has been said about Plenty. So, here goes...
       
      Chickpea saute with Greek yogurt (p. 211)
       

       
      This was a great way to kick off my time with this book. The flavors were outstanding, particularly the use of the caraway seeds and lemon juice. I used freshly-cooked Rancho Gordo chickpeas, which of course helps! The recipe was not totally trivial, but considering the flavors developed, if you don't count the time to cook the chickpeas it came together very quickly. I highly recommend this dish.
    • By Bickery
      Hey Everyone! I'm kinda new to all this, so excuse any violation of mores.
      Searching google for anything on Mr. Steingarten on the web led me to
      this forum. It appears te me that most of you are food professionals or
      nearly that, while i'm just a 21-yr old student who likes to cook.

      I own both Jeffries books, and i've started putting together a list of
      all the books he sort of recommends in his writing. Thus came an idea
      for this forum, wouldn't it be fun to concoct a list of say 50
      cookbooks from the world over? I everybody, and hopefully mr
      Steingarten along with them, would contribute his or hers favourote
      books, this could be very interesting.

      Due to my limited library on the subject (most cookbooks i've read are
      mom's) i shall begin by contributing my current favourite.

      I shall put it in last place, because i'm sure a lot of you will have
      thing to say on the subject.

      so:

      50. La cucina essentiale - Stefano Cavallini


      I hope a lot of suggestions will follow!

      Yours Truly,

      Rik

      (Host's Note: Thanks to eG member marmish, who has compiled a list of everything mentioned as of the end of July 2009: it can be found here. -CH)
    • By liuzhou
      I'm hearing rumours of a new book from Fuchsia Dunlop, this time on Zhejiang cuisine from the east of China around Hangzhou and Ningbo, south of Shanghai. No date or title - or confirmation yet.
    • By Droo
      I'm making the citron cream recipe in Migoya's Elements of Desserts (p318/9?).
      It says to cook the anglaise to 85 degrees, place on an ice bath then whip the anglaise. I've done that but it doesn't seem to whip (let alone to a medium peak).
       
      This is a new technique I've not tried before so I'm at a loss. Anyone have any ideas?
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.