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Pastry Classes


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French Pastry School in Chicago

French Culinary Institute in NYC

Edited by John DePaula (log)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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What kid of pastry, Ruth? Like baking croissants or like sugar work? Narrow that down a bit or are you just open to whatever. Umm, my first thoughts were the big culinary schools in New York and Chicago or that one in the Midwest. In any part of the country?

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John, thanks for those links -- hmmm, I've never been to Chicago...... that could be interesting!

What kid of pastry, Ruth? Like baking croissants or like sugar work? Narrow that down a bit or are you just open to whatever. Umm, my first thoughts were the big culinary schools in New York and Chicago or that one in the Midwest. In any part of the country?

This is part of the problem I'm having, K8! I'm decent-to-pretty good (though certainly not expert) at everything I've tried on my own, running the gamut from cake decorating to laminated doughs to bread to chocolates..... and don't really know what I'd like to focus on. I have not done any sugar work, so that might be a way to go. I guess I'm open to being swayed by what's available, more so than looking to fill a specific niche.

Real helpful, huh? :laugh:

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Oh, DuckDuck, great idea! Ruth, that's an idea to consider. Wow that would be too cool. But I mean they have so much stuff going on.

I think I would just get the upcoming class list for the different locations see who's teaching what. Who's teaching is of course as important as what the course is.

Pastry Scoop does the clinic classes for FCI in New York.

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CIA does weekend classes and Continuing Education classes. The CE classes are about a week long while the weekend classes are pretty basic and go for a few hours on saturdays once or twice every three weeks.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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I myself am looking at some continuing education classes too. I think French Pastry School is on the top of my list right now for pastries. Their continuing education classes are targetted towards working professionals and a lot of them are taught by professionals from the industry.

as for bread, I will definitely go to SFBI - San francisco baking institute.

Let us know what you decide.

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I myself am looking at some continuing education classes too. I think French Pastry School is on the top of my list right now for pastries. Their continuing education classes are targetted towards working professionals and a lot of them are taught by professionals from the industry.

as for bread, I will definitely go to SFBI - San francisco baking institute.

Let us know what you decide.

I am definitely interested in the French Pastry School as well. They have some classes designated as "suited for the food enthusiast", implying that the other classes are more geared toward professionals. Of course, the "professional" classes interest me more than the others. I am not a professional, but am a very experienced and passionate amateur -- would I be crazy to tackle one of the more hard-core classes, do you think?

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I am definitely interested in the French Pastry School as well. They have some classes designated as "suited for the food enthusiast", implying that the other classes are more geared toward professionals. Of course, the "professional" classes interest me more than the others. I am not a professional, but am a very experienced and passionate amateur -- would I be crazy to tackle one of the more hard-core classes, do you think?

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I am definitely interested in the French Pastry School as well. They have some classes designated as "suited for the food enthusiast", implying that the other classes are more geared toward professionals. Of course, the "professional" classes interest me more than the others. I am not a professional, but am a very experienced and passionate amateur -- would I be crazy to tackle one of the more hard-core classes, do you think?

Go for it! I would definitely take the professional classes... like you said, you're very experienced, I;m sure you know all the basics, so why not take up the challege and move up a level? you will learn more in the professional class. Which class are you interested in?

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If you know what you are doing, aim high. I've taken several classes at the Institute of Culinary Education in New York City. I've chosen my classes well, concentrating in areas that I have experience and want to perfect.

I've had good teachers and learned a lot.

However -- the same is not so for my fellow students. If you've had any other continuing education classes, you know what a drag that can be.

Many people take classes for fun. Strictly for fun, and the schools seem to be catering to this, offering classes for groups of people to make a meal together and socialize. That's fine, but it's no environment in which to be challenged.

The last class I took, I hustled my ass off because I knew what I was doing, I was the leader of my group, directing everyone's energies so that we could coordinate ourselves. Because we were on the ball, we were given extra recipes to complete when other groups couldn't manage their responsibilities. I was running back and forth observing and asking questions of people who were working on recipes I wanted to learn. At the end of the day, while I was still steeped in responsibility, my classmates loaded up on the goodies and I had only a few things to take home to share after my big day.

I don't regret it, I got my money's worth, and at the end of the day the chef told me I'd done good work. But, honey, I was tired, and then I had to remake the recipe to share at home!

So, in short, aim high. You'll learn the most.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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i think you should respect the school's rules: pro classes are for pros.

if you intend on becoming a pro then you should tell them.

i've taken more than a few classes at FPS and speak from experience...the school would not differentiate if they didn't care

*no affiliation*

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i think you should respect the school's rules: pro classes are for pros.

if you intend on becoming a pro then you should tell them.

i've taken more than a few classes at FPS and speak from experience...the school would not differentiate if they didn't care

*no affiliation*

Thanks for this feedback. I did in fact speak with a helpful woman in admissions at FPS and told her of my dilemma. She did warn me that the pacing in the pro classes is faster than the non-pro, that they're not going to take time go over basics such as tempering chocolate and the like -- which is not a problem for me. My issue is that the "hobbyist" classes are very likely to be too basic for my experience level, and a relative waste of time and money for me. I'd rather challenge myself to keep up to a high level of performance, than be the "class leader" setting a faster pace than the other students.

Does this make sense? I really am interested in your feedback, as you have direct experience with the FPS. For added background, I have been baking for 10+ years and have taken classes in advanced pastry at The Restaurant School in Philadelphia, as well as with the chefs at Miel Patisserie (founded by the former Pastry Chef at Le Bec Fin). At home I have tackled and am proficient in everything from dipped chocolates and truffles to puff pastry and pate a choux to French macarons and cooked syrup buttercreams to layered dacquoise cakes to opera cake....... not to toot my own horn, LOL, but to give you an idea of my background. I really want to take my skills and experience to the next level, but a professional degree is not in the cards at this point in my life.

Thoughts?

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Many people take classes for fun.  Strictly for fun, and the schools seem to be catering to this, offering classes for groups of people to make a meal together and socialize.  That's fine, but it's no environment in which to be challenged.

This is precisely what I'm trying to avoid. Thanks for the input!

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makes great sense.

keep in mind that in spite of the fact your a paying "customer," these classes often are "managed" similar to production setting. if you have a hard time keeping up, then you will effectively hold the "team" back.

the professional staff there should help you make the best choice based upon your knoweledge level without compromising the pace of the course...i'm exercising diplomacy here :)

Edited by artisanbaker (log)
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i think you should respect the school's rules: pro classes are for pros.

if you intend on becoming a pro then you should tell them.

i've taken more than a few classes at FPS and speak from experience...the school would not differentiate if they didn't care

*no affiliation*

Thanks for this feedback. I did in fact speak with a helpful woman in admissions at FPS and told her of my dilemma. She did warn me that the pacing in the pro classes is faster than the non-pro, that they're not going to take time go over basics such as tempering chocolate and the like -- which is not a problem for me. My issue is that the "hobbyist" classes are very likely to be too basic for my experience level, and a relative waste of time and money for me. I'd rather challenge myself to keep up to a high level of performance, than be the "class leader" setting a faster pace than the other students.

Does this make sense? I really am interested in your feedback, as you have direct experience with the FPS. For added background, I have been baking for 10+ years and have taken classes in advanced pastry at The Restaurant School in Philadelphia, as well as with the chefs at Miel Patisserie (founded by the former Pastry Chef at Le Bec Fin). At home I have tackled and am proficient in everything from dipped chocolates and truffles to puff pastry and pate a choux to French macarons and cooked syrup buttercreams to layered dacquoise cakes to opera cake....... not to toot my own horn, LOL, but to give you an idea of my background. I really want to take my skills and experience to the next level, but a professional degree is not in the cards at this point in my life.

Thoughts?

For my 2cents, I'd say you are most definitely NOT a beginner and the non-pro classes would probably be a waste of your time and money. Talk to the folks at FPS and tell them just what you've said here. I bet that they'll encourage you to take the pro classes.

Good luck and have fun! :biggrin:

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Share on other sites
makes great sense.

keep in mind that in spite of the fact your a paying "customer," these classes often are "managed" similar to production setting. if you have a hard time keeping up, then you will effectively hold the "team" back.

the professional staff there should help you make the best choice based upon your knoweledge level without compromising the pace of the course...i'm exercising diplomacy here :)

I hear you.

The class I'm most interested in is taught by Norman Love. I've decided to be proactive and contact him to get his take on whether the class would be suitable for me (or vise versa, LOL!). Have emailed and will share what I learn.

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I'd love to hear how everything works out for you and your thoughts about the class if you do go. best

Well, I've just spoken with Norman Love, and he was very encouraging that I take his class, so I'm going to go for it. Thanks to everyone for the input. The class isn't until September, but I will certainly be sure to post a report!

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Class with Norman! Too cool. You go, Girl! Be sure to post after. I'll be looking forward to reading it. :biggrin:

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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