Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Forgotten Foods


zpzjessica
 Share

Recommended Posts

In ancient times, when nomads crossed the deserts on camels (before there were tourists or cameras following them :wink: ) they used to carry dried-milk cubes. You know, like. . you milk your camel, then allow the milk to curdle in the sun, then press it somehow into dried little hard things that you could pop in your mouth like just so many Raisinets when you might need sustenance on a long journey. There's a reference in Reay Tannahill's "Food in History".

Lots of good forgotten Ancient Roman foods, too. Probably for good reason. :smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Care to share the recipe? How did you leach the tannin?

Swan is still served, rarely, today. It is only served by Royal Prerogative, but St John's College has the right and privilege, and serves it at feasts, usually as a galantine, since its tough.

Tastes like tough fishy duck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Care to share the recipe? How did you leach the tannin?

Swan is still served, rarely, today.  It is only served by Royal Prerogative, but St John's College has the right and privilege, and serves it at feasts, usually as a galantine, since its tough.

Tastes like tough fishy duck.

Goodness. I'll have to hunt up that recipe. Those were the olden days, when women were allowed to leach tannin and even sharpen the very atmosphere with their tongues. It's likely that I used that method. :wink:

Thank goodness for St. John's, though I detest galantines of any form or flavor after having made too many. Making too many galantines can become like a science-fiction movie at best, a horror movie at worst. All that meat. Brandy. Meat. Brandy. A pistachio or two.

Your fishy duck comment reminded me of "Bombay Duck", though. Haven't heard of that lately, but then of course there's not a lot of ancient colonels sitting before the fire in ratty leather armchairs at the club telling old tales here in Virginia.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

when I was very young I used to stay on a relative's farm and eat cornflakes with a splodge thick yellow cream on top and for years and years and years I have been trying to figure out what that cream was..... we are now living in rural England and I visited a neighbour's milking shed and realised it was the layer of raw cream on the top of fresh milk which had sat for a while...OMG it is the most wonderful cream you will ever eat :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Ancient grains" -- faro, spelt & quinoa -- seem to have become trendy all of a sudden.

Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't had boiled chicken and dumplings in a pot since the 50s. That was generally our Sunday afternoon dinner my mother made and my grandmother made.

Davydd

It is just an Anglicized Welsh spelling for David to celebrate my English/Welsh ancestry. The Welsh have no "v" in their alphabet or it would be spelled Dafydd.

I must warn you. My passion is the Breaded Pork Tenderloin Sandwich

Now blogging: Pork Tenderloin Sandwich Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In thinking of this forgotten food, I'm reminded of a saying from my youth, rarely heard anymore: "Make yourself useful!"

To which my Not-Really-My-Uncle Earl used to append, "as well as ornamental."

SB (would prefer to serve as a decorative centerpiece in this regard) :shock:

You might actually be able to start a nice little side-business, doing just that. People are always looking for interesting table-topper ideas, no?

Do let me know if you need any help. :smile:

............................................

Another "forgotten food", one of my favorites: ambergris.

Edited by Carrot Top (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Salmon loaf.

My mother used to serve it on Good Friday. I recently got a hankering for it, found a recipe and made it. Damn good. Better the second day.

By the way, raw cheeses are available. Personally prefer a raw sheep to anything else.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't had boiled chicken and dumplings in a pot since the 50s. That was generally our Sunday afternoon dinner my mother made and my grandmother made.

You need to come on down here to Missouri, my friend. The Kozy Korner Cafe (thank god they didn't go with Kafe) serves chicken and dumplings every Wednesday for their special. You get two sides, too, so you can add some corn or slaw or hush puppies or green beans cooked with hamhocks.

And 'bout every week some group of church ladies or another is having a chicken and dumplings supper to raise money to send missionaries off to annoy the heathens.

Chicken and dumplings are not dead. We do make the noodly ones here, not the puffy biscuity ones.

Those might be dead. :hmmm:

Edited by sparrowgrass (log)
sparrowgrass
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't had boiled chicken and dumplings in a pot since the 50s. That was generally our Sunday afternoon dinner my mother made and my grandmother made.

You need to come on down here to Missouri, my friend. The Kozy Korner Cafe (thank god they didn't go with Kafe) serves chicken and dumplings every Wednesday for their special. You get two sides, too, so you can add some corn or slaw or hush puppies or green beans cooked with hamhocks.

And 'bout every week some group of church ladies or another is having a chicken and dumplings supper to raise money to send missionaries off to annoy the heathens.

Chicken and dumplings are not dead. We do make the noodly ones here, not the puffy biscuity ones.

Those might be dead. :hmmm:

Nope, not dead at all. We make a sort of in between, a puffy pillow of biscuit dough, rolled and cut. About once every six weeks or so, with a lot of black pepper.

In my conversations with my siblings and friends all over the southeast, not dead at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In thinking of this forgotten food, I'm reminded of a saying from my youth, rarely heard anymore: "Make yourself useful!"

To which my Not-Really-My-Uncle Earl used to append, "as well as ornamental."

SB (would prefer to serve as a decorative centerpiece in this regard) :shock:

You might actually be able to start a nice little side-business, doing just that. People are always looking for interesting table-topper ideas, no?

Do let me know if you need any help. :smile:

I'm thinking of starting a chain of restaurants called Eat Me

Our slogan: "How May We Serve You Best"

SB (franchises opportunities now available in your area!) :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beasting pie.

A wonderful open custard tart made from the colostrum or first milk from a cow after it has given birth.

Last had one about 1962. superb and creamy.

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...