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Lots and lots of coconut!


annachan
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Over the holiday, I picked up a 10 lb box of coconut flakes, thinking I would use it for toasted coconut marshmallows. Plans changed and we made all truffles instead. No coconut usage.

So, what now? I was watching Food TV the other night and saw these Coconut Strips. Anyone have an idea how to make some? I'm thinking that would use up a good portion of my coconut.

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I would be tempted to use freshly grated coconut for this recipe but perhaps it would work well with pre-grated coconut as well. The recipe is for a "confiture de noix coco" or coconut preserves in Backyard Bistros, Farmhouse Fare: A French Country Cookbook by Jane Sigal that I have been meaning to try. The recipe involves making a deep amber caramel with 1/2 cup sugar and 2 Tbs water. As soon as you take the caramel off the heat, you blend in 2 cups grated coconut to cool it off a bit. Then return the pan to medium high heat and stir in 3 cups of water. Cook for ~ 10 min, stirring occasionally. Then stir in 1/2 cup sugar, 1 tsp vanilla and 1 3-inch piece of cinnamon. Cook for about 20-30 more min stirring now and then until most of the water evaporates. The recipe recommends that you can pour this into jars, chill and use for about 2 months or you can process the mixture into canning jars for longer storage.

I'm a coconut fiend so to me this sounds like heaven as a spread on toast. Let us know what you think of it if you try it! :smile:

edited to add: The Henrietta's coconut strips that you linked to sound intriguing as well. With the ingredients listed and the photo shown, I wonder if one might try to "bread" the coconut slices with an egg and milk mixture followed by a dip in flour with a pinch of salt. Then fry the strips in vegetable oil and finish the freshly fried pieces with a dip in sugar? One might also try adding a small amount of cinnamon or grated lime zest to the sugar mix.

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Chocolate covered coconut, coconut haystacks.

I vote for the coconut cream pie, though. With ten pounds to work with, man, you could p-e-r-f-e-c-t that thing!

Congo bars with coconut.

Glue it to a bikini.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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You could use some of the coconut to make coconut milk for curries.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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You could use some of the coconut to make coconut milk for curries.

That sounds really good. How? Do I just steep it in milk?

Actually, water is typically used.

This is the method I've used and that I've seen mentioned in most Thai cookbooks. The link also has some quicker methods using a blender. click

Using desiccated coconut : Many cooks use desiccated coconut for making milk. It is much easier and quicker to prepare than grating  fresh coconut, and n curries you cannot tell the difference. Put 2 cups desiccated coconut in a large bowl and pour over 2 1/2 cups hot water. Allow to cool to lukewarm, then knead firmly with the hand for a few minutes and strain through a fine strainer or a piece of muslin, squeezing out as much liquid as possible. This should produce approximately 1 1/2 cups thick coconut milk.

Repeat the process using the same coconut and 2 1/2 cups more hot water. This extract will yield approximately 2 cups of thin coconut milk.

For certain recipes you might want or need the "thicker" milk so you can keep it separate from the second weaker batch depending on your needs. One example is that I use the thinner coconut milk for cooking the glutinous rice for mangoes and sticky rice and then use the thicker milk for a sweetend sauce to go with the finished dish.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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