Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Foodblog: lovebenton0, Pam R, snowangel - North of the 30th paralle


snowangel
 Share

Recommended Posts

Pam, did you pick the blueberries yourself?

No - I haven't gone blueberry picking in years. When I was a kid, my family had a cottage in Western Ontario (just north of Kenora, for those of you who know the area). We had an acre of land on the shores of a little lake, where the blueberries grew wild. Every once in a while we'd go to special 'spots' in the area that my parents had found for blueberry picking. We'd pick buckets and make fresh blueberry pies in graham wafer crust pies (because we had no oven for a 'real' crust) and pick through them all, wash them and freeze them to use throughout the year. Now I just buy them during the summer when they're a good price and wash and freeze them. Compared to the wild berries, they're only good, not great. But they're still great to have in the freezer to pull out in the middle of a winter day.

pam, how are you feeling... better, i hope.

the pear soup sounds fabulous. from your brief i may have most ingredients on hand.

and... ok, i passed up asking yesterday, but i'm too curious now. way outside the loonie loop here  :raz: [haven't lived close to canada since 1972], what did you need it for...

I took a nap and feel a little refreshed - thanks! My mother has come down with a serious cold, and I'm concerned I've caught the same thing. Or else I'm just tired. :wink: .

Sorry about the loonie reference! Years ago (I think the late 80's) the Canadian government did away with the dollar bill and introduced the loonie. It's a gold-coloured coin with the Queen (we are in the Commonwealth of course) on one side and a loon on the other. Hence, the loonie.

(I just did a search, clicky).

About 10 years ago, they did away with the $2 bill, and we now have the toonie, natch.

So, to prevent us from stealing shopping carts, we must insert a loonie into the mechanism on the cart to release it from all of the other carts. Cuz that $1 is going to stop you from taking it . . .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dinner: a piece of chicken from Friday night, and a big bowl of split pea soup. When my family had a kosher deli, this was the most popular soup - and so easy to make. I kept it vegetarian - since I was out of chicken stock. Yes, homemade stock is the best thing to use. No, we shouldn't all stop making out own soups if we don't have the time to make stock. Just find something you like, and use it. 'Nuff said.

The Split Pea Mise:

gallery_25849_641_30090.jpg

The cooking:

gallery_25849_641_24878.jpggallery_25849_641_13820.jpg

gallery_25849_641_12527.jpggallery_25849_641_13081.jpg

The soup bowl:

gallery_25849_641_12551.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to be checking in so late, folks. I've been flat-out busy with interesting but time-consuming work projects for the past couple of weeks, so I didn't even discover this blog until last night. I still have a bunch of catch-up reading to do, but I wanted to say a general "Yum!" to the whole soup topic. I have all sorts of fond childhood memories of soup-making, and have created several new soup memories since being on my own as an adult. I was eating congee, pho, and bun bo Hue seemingly every day for weeks and weeks last year, and I think it played a major role in my successfully navigating last year's health issues.

But unless my quick searches of this blog have missed something, I've yet to see any mention of one of my favorite literary references to soup! So I must offer it as a gift to our noble trio of bloggers: "Soo--oop of the e--e--evening, Beautiful, beautiful Soup!" :laugh:

P.S. You've inspired me to turn out a quick little soup of my own this evening ... :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah, having a party. I ended up with closer to 30 than 20, and an eclectic mix which was very good. It's good to entertain. It forces you to get groups together, and to get the house clean! I must add that not 3 weeks after we moved into the New House from the Old House (where we'd lived for 18 years), I had 35 over for a fancy Easter thing. Kicked my butt in gear to get the house organized. Some would say I'm crazy, the the mission was accomplished, and all but about 4 boxes were unpacked!

But, back to today. I have very few photos. In fact, I only have two, but one can cook and clean and tend to guests or take pictures, especially when the kids are prepping for a party on a Sunday by getting homework done.

But, my two photos:

First off, two kitchen favorites. These were both wedding presents. One is the container of "trivets." This has sat on my counter since that day 25+ years ago when we returned from our honeymoon. The other was the gift of a sleeve of bar coasters from a friend who worked in a bar. I'm sure it was an inexpensive (perhaps free?) gift, but we only have a handful left, and I"ll be on the lookout for more. Truely a good gift.

gallery_6263_3_122258.jpg

So, back to our party. We ran through three salads, two heads of cauliflower and broccoli, a mess of chips, another pineapple, every single piece of fruit in the bowl, 9 pounds of wings, and 50 potstickers.

I love potstickers, and I do a nice job of them. It took me about 10-15 minutes to pleat 50 of these. I saved a bit of filling and a few skins for me for tomorrow.

gallery_6263_3_23108.jpg

I will say that the wings (ala Buffalo, with a mixture of Frank's and butter) were a hit, but the potstickers had them standing in line.

I'll make a few more tmorrow, and hopefully provide a better photo essay on them.

Potstickers rule, and I'd never be able to pleat like I do were it not for Barbara Tropp's instructions.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

thought i had downloaded all the pics from soupmaking today, but hadn't. i formatted the memory stick too soon and they're gone. not a big deal, it was a simple tex-mex style soup. what i'd call an end of week pleasure 'cuz it cleans up your week. easy to make, spicy and comforting.

sautee sliced onions, chopped green pepper and corn in butter. transfer to your pot with about four cups of stock or broth [chicken or veg], tomatoes and green chilies. quickly sautee some chicken [leftover is your target] with minced garlic, add to soup with some chili powder and ground cumin. allow to simmer about 10 to 15 minutes while you grill split cornbread in butter, preferably on the same griddle/pan you sauteed everything else. put half of one piece in bottom of bowl, ladle in soup. stick the other half into soup. garnish with chopped raw onions, black olives, and jalapenoes.

when avocados are nice i like to top with slices and a squeeze of lime. but avocados are downright nasty up here right now. typically you sprinkle some shredded cheese on hot cornbread before sticking in soup, but no cheese for me this week.

the finished soup...

gallery_12550_4173_24334.jpg

for dessert i'm having a cup of coffee and a slice of chocolate bread with dried cherries and toasted almonds. the kneadful thing did indeed all the basic kneading for me on that one. i'm pleased with the bread... very. i like chocolate bread pudding and this would make incredible bread pudding.

i'll post a recipe in rg once i catch up after the blog and the [sick] cold recedes.

after all the onions and garlic i sliced/chopped/minced tonight, this seems an appropriate time to say, i like this stuff. it also works on fishy smells. it's a cream made with green tea and wasabi [two favs of mine anyway]; soothing and nice on my hands, way better than using lemon.

gallery_12550_4173_14831.jpg

i didn't buy this. it came as a freebie with something i ordered here. glad i got it. it's from upper canada soap and candle makers in mississauga.

and that's it for tonight guys. sleep warm.

edited to correct spelling

Edited by lovebenton0 (log)

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love potstickers, and I do a nice job of them.  It took me about 10-15 minutes to pleat 50 of these.  I saved a bit of filling and a few skins for me for tomorrow.

gallery_6263_3_23108.jpg

I will say that the wings (ala Buffalo, with a mixture of Frank's and butter) were a hit, but the potstickers had them standing in line.

I'll make a few more tmorrow, and hopefully provide a better photo essay on them.

Potstickers rule, and I'd never be able to pleat like I do were it not for Barbara Tropp's instructions.

just saw this, susan. i'm impressed. those potstickers are works of art.

sounds like you threw another successful bash. will be watching for more potsticker instructions tomorrow.

now it is good night, and sweetest dreams.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

margy, i can relate to that. last year i still lived in austin tx as i had for many years before that. winter 2006 was an exceptionally warm season even for us. i was begging it to get down to low 60s. when it would first hit 60 though after the tx heat, i'd be chilled. then i'd adjust. as i think i said yesterday, right before stepping out into the -30 wind chill, i like cold.  :wacko: [...]

Judith, if it wouldn't be too off-topic or personal, why did you move to Wisconsin from Texas? I had to go out and play a recital today in weather not nearly as cold as that but still plenty cold for me. I was able to dress adequately for it and even walk crosstown (from 14th and 8th to 7th and just about 1st, if that means anything to you), but my apartment is chilly, I'm wearing a sweater as I type, and I couldn't imagine moving to a place that has winters with really long periods of extreme cold, except for a really good job.

Stay warm, everyone, and be well!

Edited by Pan (log)

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is yet another brutally cold morning...Heidi and I both flinched when I walked her to the end of the driveway to meet her bus.

But, my house is warm, as is the coffee.

Kao Soi for dinner tonight!

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah, having a party.  I ended up with closer to 30 than 20, and an eclectic mix which was very good.  It's good to entertain.  It forces you to get groups together, and to get the house clean!  I must add that not 3 weeks after we moved into the New House from the Old House (where we'd lived for 18 years), I had 35 over for a fancy Easter thing.  Kicked my butt in gear to get the house organized.  Some would say I'm crazy, the the mission was accomplished, and all but about 4 boxes were unpacked!

But, back to today.  I have very few photos.  In fact, I only have two, but one can cook and clean and tend to guests or take pictures, especially when the kids are prepping for a party on a Sunday by getting homework done.

But, my two photos:

First off, two kitchen favorites.  These were both wedding presents.  One is the container of "trivets."  This has sat on my counter since that day 25+ years ago when we returned from our honeymoon.  The other was the gift of a sleeve of bar coasters from a friend who worked in a bar.  I'm sure it was an inexpensive (perhaps free?) gift, but we only have a handful left, and I"ll be on the lookout for more.  Truely a good gift.

gallery_6263_3_122258.jpg

:biggrin: My mom loves the coasters too.

My uncles in Kuala Lumpur own a coffeeshop, so she gets them when we go back for a visit.

My little nephew discovered that when wet, they tear quite easily into little shreds. We've lost many that way.

May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Memo to self: Must eat split pea soup from freezer soon. Easily one of my favorite soups, especially if I have Vienna bread or challah to eat with it... which I'd need to make, and I'm not sure any of the yeast I have is still viable.

I did make chili in the crock pot yesterday, and I cut down on the liquid. It still turned out a wee bit soupy, but I just crumbled more cornbread in. I also broke my Cuisinart blade trying to mince the pork - it was still too frozen. Boy, do I feel dumb. (Memo to self: start topic to see if it is fixable.) Alas, I forgot to take photos of the process (aside from some onions on the cutting board).

You ladies have inspired me this week. Last week I made "leftover soup" twice, and it's on the menu for lunch again tomorrow - all the bits and scraps I've saved (a chicken leg, some lentils, cooked veggies, etc.), to be eaten with bread and salad. I am not usually a big soup eater; if the soup is too liquid, I feel sloshy for hours after eating it.

Susan, those potstickers look delicious. Of course, I always think dumplings of any nature look delicious.

It is wicked cold here now, but not as cold as any of our bloggers' locales. Eep.

Jennie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I made a firm starter to make bread dough (sourdoug again) two days ago and forgot about it. Do we think I can still use it to make dough?

It is still unbelievably cold, so I am now wearing long underwear, a t-shirt, turtleneck, a heavy sweatshirt and a sweatshirt. It's hard to believe that it will ever get warm, and that in just a few (long) months, things will green up and grow!

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good morning. -40 C/F here when I woke up (I couldn't find a windchill value - currently -33 C (or -38 C according to the weather network). Apparently there is only a light breeze right now - but it's bitterly cold. For some reason it feels much colder than any other day this week . . . School buses have been cancelled around the region - though schools remain open.

I was just reminiscing about 'snow days'. Anybody remember staying bundled up in the house instead of going to school - a pot of soup often played a part in those days.

There was a funny headline in the Winnipeg Free Press this morning: A little break in big freeze 'Heat wave' of -23 to -19 forecast for Thursday, but it won't last - heh, funny.

So, breakfast this morning - Ya Pear (Japanese pear to some) and some almonds.

I have no idea what's for dinner - but I'm leaning away from a soup tonight... we'll be playing it by ear.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is still unbelievably cold, so I am now wearing long underwear, a t-shirt, turtleneck, a heavy sweatshirt and a sweatshirt.  It's hard to believe that it will ever get warm, and that in just a few (long) months, things will green up and grow!

I am trying to envision you, moving around your kitchen like a little kid in a pink snowsuit zipped up to her eyebrows, trying vainly to reach down and get just one handful of snow.

This is just the nicest thing to wake up to---things going on in the even-colder part of the country than mine (and we were -16 last night, I think; it's -3 now). Of course, a lot of that -27 Windchill may have come from all that breeze of the yelling done all over town by happy Colts fans.

Sweet smells of simmery soup and baking bread, and the enticing scent of the starters and yeasts and barms and doughs, resting warm and growing.

We never called it "leftover soup"---it was always "fridgerator soup," and started with a quart or two of home-canned tomatoes. A little sizzled onion and bell pepper, in with the red sloosh of the tomato jars, a can of Pride of Illinois corn, straight from the can, and an uncovering and choosing from any and everything in the fridge.

A little bowl of pale tan field peas, with the little bits of bacon that made them so delicious; a Tupperware of two-days-ago spaghetti and meatballs, with the meat cut into spoon-bite bits; some home-canned snap beans still holding on to their gentle vinegar tang; a Saran-wrapped block of homemade macaroni and cheese (made mostly with Ronco spaghetti at our house, thick and slabby with all the grated hoop cheese), cut into small bits and added last, to melt and swirl into the mixture, making it rich and homey.

We had soups and stews and gumbos (one of which I hope to find the recipe for; it was from a dear neighbor who was raised on Avery Island, home of Tabasco sauce, and who taught me the makings of court boullion---soon coo-beyon' with the uplifted "n" came as easily from my lips as from hers).

Her gumbo was made from the wild mallards brought home by every man and boy, and a couple of daughters who grew up in kneeboots, striding those fields toward the water, lying on frozen ground for hours awaiting those overflying shadows. Mrs. J. made the court boullion from several ducks, simmered into softly-falling dark richness. She boned them, and added the meat back to the big pot, seasoned it right at the end with file' powder, and ladled it over big scoops of long-grain rice lying warm in the wide soupbowls.

Nothing in those bowls but rice, the clear brownish broth with tiny golden flecks of duckfat afloat, and maybe a wisp of softly-cooked onion here and there. That was all---duck, onion, salt, file' powder, water. I think. We gathered at each others' houses for potfuls of the stuff. My Dad would make the big cooker full and invite the six of them. She would oblige by cooking up a batch, and having the four of us over.

One evening we arrived to find her blushing a bit, and wanting to explain things, in case we thought her strange for putting roadkill in her pot---a neighbor had brought her a guinea hen from his farm way out in the country. The flock of them had scattered around his truck, and he accidentally ran over one, so she was his first thought---that Cajun woman with all her strange herbs and ingredients. She welcomed it gladly, and I don't think we could tell one tender chunk from another in the bowls.

Gosh, I've had too much coffee!!! Anyway, stay warm and think:

TOMATOES :wub: TOMATOES :wub: TOMATOES :wub:

Edited by racheld (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We never called it "leftover soup"---it was always "fridgerator soup," and started with a quart or two of home-canned tomatoes. 

We call it the 'kitchen sink soup' - everything goes into the pot, but the kitchen sink.

Anybody else?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Judith, I know that creamy/milky things are out right now (too mucousy!), but there is a wonderful "loose but creamy" garlic soup in Paula Wolfert's Cooking of Southwest France which is thickened with eggs. This is a favorite here, and as I've said before, the only disappointment is that the wonderful aroma doesn't last for days...

Diana is home today with The Crud. When I called her school this morning to report the absence, the Lady On The Phone informed me that I wasn't the ony mom calling intoday. She's also bundled up with a ton of clothes, and resting on the sofa, covered in a couple of handmade quilts.

I'm getting to my bread dough and potstickers in a few minutes.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

good morning all

gallery_12550_4173_30375.jpg

I made a firm starter to make bread dough (sourdoug again) two days ago and forgot about it.  Do we think I can still use it to make dough?

It is still unbelievably cold, so I am now wearing long underwear, a t-shirt, turtleneck, a heavy sweatshirt and a sweatshirt.  It's hard to believe that it will ever get warm, and that in just a few (long) months, things will green up and grow!

yes, susan. your starter should be fine. let it sit where it can warm up just a bit. :laugh: probably oven with the light on would be fine... then proceed.

i love my flannel-lined jeans. i've been wearing two and three layers all week. long undies under the jeans, undershirt, turtleneck, sweater or sweatshirt and heavy wool socks. but last night the big heavy sweatpants and big fluffy fleece shirtjack were added, with a fleece throw while i was sitting. it was really cold in my flat. quinn laid down next to the bed on his double folded sleeping bag and i covered him around with his fleece blankie. his eyes said it all :wub:

started out this morning feeding my barm for a sourdough loaf while the coffee was brewing.

gallery_12550_4173_13683.jpg

we're heading out to walk. it's up to -4 [wind chill -28], but still sunny and very windy outside, which means cold as... pick your simile. :shock:

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We never called it "leftover soup"---it was always "fridgerator soup," and started with a quart or two of home-canned tomatoes. 

We call it the 'kitchen sink soup' - everything goes into the pot, but the kitchen sink.

Anybody else?

nail soup... just start with what you got, and be surprised with what you get.

personally, i stopped calling them leftovers years ago. they're makeovers, because i always find something new to do with them. :wink:

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Judith - I hope you're staying warm!

Just had lunch. A good tossed salad and some not so good fake chicken nuggets. :hmmm: I don't generally eat these things, but I do sell them - and I was trying a new brand that several people had asked for. I'm not sure why.

I'm busy working on orders here (we bring in 99% of the items we sell in our store from Toronto and Montreal - and I spend a lot of time putting together and typing up orders) and trying to warm up. I've been freezing since I left the house this morning.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You guys make a great blog team. This blog is an inspiration to me in many ways (high among them - to stay in a mediterranean environment!).

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In our home we tend to always end up with one last bowl of soup from each batch, and we freeze them in 12 ounce containers. A specialty of our house is to add these 'last bowl' containers of different soups together for a group meal. The recipe is one container per person at the table, plus one for luck. Noone ever calls it anything but soup.

My sad news today is that there are only 2 quarts of soup left in our freezer from #1boy's ministrations in the kitchen. One is a tomato based mystery, and the other is the best mushroom barley soup that I ever tasted, in my entire life. I am serving it to Kiddle and myself on Thursday, which is my birthday, and also the day #1boy's trial begins. :sad::angry::sad:

Supposedly, it is 18 degrees here in Englishtown, NJ right mow. I wouldn't know, as I haven't left my bed once today, and we have the heat set at 65 degrees. I am going to get the chills when I get my next gas bill, though! This cold stuff is why I am so homesick for Miami Beach. I don't know how all of you REAL Northerners do it for years on end! :shock:

Oh, yes, I have 2 quarts of really concentrated chicken stock, just waiting to be transformed over the weekend. Guests are encouraged, please bring bread.

More Than Salt

Visit Our Cape Coop Blog

Cure Cutaneous Lymphoma

Join the DarkSide---------------------------> DarkSide Member #006-03-09-06

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:wink:

Judith - I hope you're staying warm!

pam, were are doing our best. feels relatively warm in here now compared to the walk.

whoo-whoo-whooooo. now i know why we were so cold last night. weather channel just reported we broke our low record for today's date. record was -14f in 1979. last night we hit -31f, so yeah that's a new low. i'm just morbidly curious enough to want to know what the wind chill hit at that point. :shock:

i'm having warm cinnamony applesauce with a big, steamy mug of black coffee and a cup of naturally cold water... thinking what combo of fresh and makeover goodies i can clear out from the soup blog all week for nail soup on our next to last night.

i've got choices, and i'm about to go on the sourdough bread dough also.

so looking in here, here and here...

gallery_12550_4173_47021.jpggallery_12550_4173_10781.jpggallery_12550_4173_11741.jpg

... i came up with a plan for dinner. beef noodle soup.

crockpot beef roast from monday [i have about a lb of beef with rich broth i didn't use in the barley beef soup], the other half of the noodles from saturday's chicken noodle soup, and some fresh baby carrots and onions to throw in with all. think i'll roast the carrots and onions while the oven is going for the bread. probably a salad to go along while i have the fresh greens.

just a note about the cereal box in the freezer... it's not for cereal. it's for filling freezer bags. to the right of box you see brick-like bags of soup from the week. the cereal box makes the perfect form. insert bag, fill with food, seal and allow to freeze. so much easier to store squared bricks than lumps. :wink:

i love to cook, but we all have those days when we need it as fast and clean as if someone else did it for us. for me, eating alone, after this blog week i won't have to cook unless i want to for a while. i don't try to cook to for one, unless it's breakfast or something quickie. so it's usual for me to have some good food stashed in the freezer for pull out and heat up on days that's what i need. but i don't usually have this much. :laugh:

there will be lots of tasty blog memories for me whenever i want for a while. i was disappointed to be so sick this week, but we bloggers wanted to give you a shot of our lives... as much as normal can be for blog week. :wink: you all might have seen too much normal from me. i've appreciated all the support from my co-bloggers and all of you. it's definitely been the most fun i've ever had being this sick. :biggrin:

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, as promised, I made more potstickers and wow, is it hard to take photos of potsticker shaping without assisance (Diana was having a much needed nap).

gallery_6263_3_33009.jpg

A plop of meat filling in the middle of a wrapper. Oh, wait, first I had moistened the edges with water so they'd adhere better.

gallery_6263_3_2731.jpg

This is where the photoing got trickey -- I please the right side with my right hand, and the left with my left, and it was just darned hard to do this (another thing is that since i plop the filling with my hand, I kept having to wash my hands -- three times for one potsticker!).

gallery_6263_3_12839.jpg

Looking like disorganized soldiers!

gallery_6263_3_19378.jpg

Then into a non-stick skillet that has been preheated with some oil. There should be a sizzle when they hit the skiller!

gallery_6263_3_53794.jpg

gallery_6263_3_43726.jpg

When the bottoms are brown, add some stock, then put a lid on and let them burble away. Normally I would just peek under to see if they were browned, but that fogged up the camera lense. And, when I added the stock, it immediately started steaming up the camera lense, as well!

When most of the stock is absorbed, remove the lid and let the bottoms recrisp. Then invert onto a place, eat and enjoy!

gallery_6263_3_25271.jpg

(sorry for the crappy photo!)

And, sorry for the delay in posting. I was tired after lunch, so I laid down on the couch, foot-to-foot with the patient, and we felt the warmth of the summer sun which blazed through the sunroom windows!

Oh, and Rebecca, I'm sure my natural gas bill for this month will be more than chilling!

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Duvel
      The first week of November are „autumn holidays“ in the area where I live. We wanted to use that time to go to Paris, but when my parents-in-law somewhat surprisingly announced they‘d be coming over from Spain for the whole of November, we scrapped that idea and looked for something more German …
       
      So … Berlin. Not the best time to travel (cold & rainy), but with a couple of museums for the little one and the slightly older ones to enjoy together, plus some food options I was looking forward it was a destination we could all agree on. The Covid19 warnings in the Berlin subway support that notion …
       

       
    • By liuzhou
      Note: This follows on from the Munching with the Miao topic.
       
      The three-hour journey north from Miao territory ended up taking four, as the driver missed a turning and we had to drive on to the next exit and go back. But our hosts waited for us at the expressway exit and led us up a winding road to our destination - Buyang 10,000 mu tea plantation (布央万亩茶园 bù yāng wàn mǔ chá yuán) The 'mu' is  a Chinese measurement of area equal to 0.07 of a hectare, but the 10,000 figure is just another Chinese way of saying "very large".
       
      We were in Sanjiang Dong Autonomous County, where 57% of the inhabitants are Dong.
       
      The Dong people (also known as the Kam) are noted for their tea, love of glutinous rice and their carpentry and architecture. And their hospitality. They tend to live at the foot of mountains, unlike the Miao who live in the mid-levels.
       
      By the time we arrived, it was lunch time, but first we had to have a sip of the local tea. This lady did the preparation duty.
       

       

       
      This was what we call black tea, but the Chinese more sensibly call 'red tea'. There is something special about drinking tea when you can see the bush it grew on just outside the window!
       
      Then into lunch:
       

       

      Chicken Soup
       

      The ubiquitous Egg and Tomato
       

      Dried fish with soy beans and chilli peppers. Delicious.
       

      Stir fried lotus root
       

      Daikon Radish
       

      Rice Paddy Fish Deep Fried in Camellia Oil - wonderful with a smoky flavour, but they are not smoked.
       

      Out of Focus Corn and mixed vegetable
       

      Fried Beans
       

      Steamed Pumpkin
       

      Chicken
       

      Beef with Bitter Melon
       

      Glutinous (Sticky) Rice
       

      Oranges
       

      The juiciest pomelo ever. The area is known for the quality of its pomelos.
       
      After lunch we headed out to explore the tea plantation.
       

       

       

       

       
      Interspersed with the tea plants are these camellia trees, the seeds of which are used to make the Dong people's preferred cooking oil.
       

       
      As we climbed the terraces we could hear singing and then came across this group of women. They are the tea pickers. It isn't tea picking time, but they came out in their traditional costumes to welcome us with their call and response music. They do often sing when picking. They were clearly enjoying themselves.
       

       
      And here they are:
       
       
      After our serenade we headed off again, this time to the east and the most memorable meal of the trip. Coming soon.
       
       
    • By FoodMuse
      Hello everyone,
      eGullet was nice enough to invite me to write a food blog chronicling what I've made or eaten out for one week. I'm so excited about it! Thanks guys.
      About me:
      I dream about food, I wake thinking what's for dinner and I'm so excited to share it with you. I'm part of the food world in New York. By that, I just mean that I'm so fortunate enough to be invited to great events where I get to eat great food. I'm also a nerd and a part of the technology world. I produce, edit and sometimes host food related web videos and I'm also a part of the tech world.
      I'm launching a website called Please, Pass the Gravy. www.pleasepassthegravy.com We let you create a menu, invite friends and then collaborate on that menu. Never host another potluck with 8 pasta salads. You could use it now, but we're alpha launch, it works but it's ugly. It's my ugly baby. So, if you use it be kind and message me if you have improvement ideas. I thought it would be ok to write about it here because it is food related.
      I live in Brooklyn with a lovely guy who likes to eat and a small corgi mix dog. I cook pretty much every night and do a nice brunch on the weekend. I am not a crazy dog lady, but I do admit to cooking food for the dog. I have an excuse, beyond doting, he had seizures that have stopped since not feeding him dog food.
      Foods I cook:
      Spicy foods! If you look at my blog I have a simple papaya ketchup with habanero that is pretty darn good.
      I love great cheese. This may be the week for Beer Cheese Soup.
      I try to limit carbs, though I do cheat.
      In any given week C. and I probably eat cauliflower, broccoli and green beans as a side.
      Tonight's dinner will be Vietnamese inspired. We'll see how it goes. I'll post about it as soon as I can.
      Any requests? Questions? I'd love to hear from you.
      -Grace
    • By Duvel
      In these challenging times, a full summer vacation is not an easy task. For the last 1.5 years we have been mostly at home with the clear plan to visit Catalonia (or more precise my wife’s family) latest this summer. And it looked good for a while. Unfortunately, the recent rise in case numbers in Spain have resulted in …
       
      OK, let’s skip this part. Long story short - my wife and me are fully vaccinated, as are >90% of the people we care about in Catalonia. After some discussion (after all, Germans tend to prefer to be on the safe side of things) we simply fueled up the car, got each a test (for the transit through France) and started to drive …
       
      After a leisurely 11h drive we arrived at a small fishing town somewhat north of Barcelona around 3.00am. We unloaded the car and my wife an the little one went straight to bed. 
       

       


      I found an expired beer in the elsewise pretty empty fridge and enjoyed the cool breeze on the terrace. Holidays, here we come …
       

    • By liuzhou
      Last week, Liuzhou government invited a number of diplomats from Laos, Malaysia, Indonesia, Myanmar/Burma, Poland, and Germany to visit the city and prefecture. They also invited me along. We spent Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday introducing the diplomats to the culture of the local ethnic groups and especially to their food culture.
       
      First off, we headed two hours north into the mountains of Rongshui Miao Autonomous County. The Miao people (苗族 miáo zú), who include the the Hmong, live in the mid-levels of mountains and are predominantly subsistence farmers. Our first port of call was the county town, also Rongshui (融水 róng shuǐ, literal meaning: Melt Water) where we were to have lunch. But before lunch we had to go meet some people and see their local crafts. These are people I know well from my frequent work trips to the area, but for the diplomats, it was all new.
       
      So, I had to wait for lunch, and I see no reason why you shouldn't either. Here are some of the people I live and work with.


       
      This lovely young woman is wearing the traditional costume of an unmarried girl. Many young women, including her, wear this every day, but most only on festive occasions.
       
      Her hat is made from silver (and is very heavy). Here is a closer look.
       

       
      Married women dispense with those gladrags and go for this look:
       

       
      As you can see she is weaving bamboo into a lantern cover.
       
      The men tend to go for this look, although I'm not sure that the Bluetooth earpiece for his cellphone is strictly traditional.
       

       
      The children don't get spared either
       

       
      This little girl is posing with the Malaysian Consul-General.
       
      After meeting these people we went on to visit a 芦笙 (lú shēng) workshop. The lusheng is a reed wind instrument and an important element in the Miao, Dong and Yao peoples' cultures.
       

       

       
      Then at last we headed to the restaurant, but as is their custom, in homes and restaurants, guests are barred from entering until they go through the ritual of the welcoming cup of home-brewed rice wine.
       


      The consular staff from Myanmar/Burma and Malaysia "unlock" the door.
       
      Then you have the ritual hand washing part.
       

       
      Having attended to your personal hygiene, but before  entering the dining room, there is one more ritual to go through. You arrive here and sit around this fire and wok full of some mysterious liquid on the boil.
       

       
      On a nearby table is this
       

       
      Puffed rice, soy beans, peanuts and scallion. These are ladled into bowls.
       

       
      with a little salt, and then drowned in the "tea" brewing in the wok.
       
      This is  油茶 (yóu chá) or Oil Tea. The tea is made from Tea Seed Oil which is made from the seeds of the camellia bush. This dish is used as a welcoming offering to guests in homes and restaurants. Proper etiquette suggests that three cups is a minimum, but they will keep refilling your cup until you stop drinking. First time I had it I really didn't like it, but I persevered and now look forward to it.
       

      L-R: Director of the Foreign Affairs Dept of Liuzhou government, consuls-general of Malaysia, Myanmar, Laos.
       
      Having partaken of the oil tea, finally we are allowed to enter the dining room, where two tables have been laid out for our use.
       

       
      Let the eating, finally, begin.
       
      In no particular order:
       

      Steamed corn, taro and sweet potato
       

      Bamboo Shoots
       

      Duck
       

      Banana leaf stuffed with sticky rice and mixed vegetables and steamed.
       

      Egg pancake with unidentified greenery
       

      Stir fried pork and beans
       

      Stir fried Chinese banana (Ensete lasiocarpum)
       

      Pig Ears
       

       
      This may not look like much, but was the star of the trip. Rice paddy fish, deep fried in camellia tree seed oil with wild mountain herbs. We ate this at every meal, cooked with slight variations, but never tired of it.
       

      Stir fried Greens
       
      Our meal was accompanied by the wait staff singing to us and serving home-made rice wine (sweetish and made from the local sticky rice).
       
       
       
       
      Everything we ate was grown or reared within half a kilometre of the restaurant and was all free-range, organic. And utterly delicious.
       
      Roll on dinner time.
       
      On the trip I was designated the unofficial official photographer and ended up taking 1227 photographs. I just got back last night and was busy today, so I will try to post the rest of the first day (and dinner) as soon as I can.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...