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Riveted handles on cookware

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I know this is an ancient topic, but I was just reading through it and was surprised I didn't see anyone point out that many of these cookwares are clad which probably provides some complications for both welding and strength (you're welding to the outer layer of the clad, and you have to worry about the outer ply pulling off, etc.).  That said, I'm unreasonably annoyed by rivets, especially on non-stick.

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5 hours ago, JohnN said:

I know this is an ancient topic, but I was just reading through it and was surprised I didn't see anyone point out that many of these cookwares are clad which probably provides some complications for both welding and strength (you're welding to the outer layer of the clad, and you have to worry about the outer ply pulling off, etc.).  That said, I'm unreasonably annoyed by rivets, especially on non-stick.

 

You are correct that welding clad is quite technical.  However, it is not layer separation that is the issue.  Weld overpenetration has caused corrosion beneath the weld, and that corrosion can cause catastrophic failure of the welds--obviously a safety issue.  As is under-penetration.  When the layer being welded to is <0.5mm thick, the process needs to be very precisely controlled, probably something only industrial robotics can do dependably.

 

There have been cookware recalls because of this problem set, including a very costly one for the world's largest producer.  The owner of that company has vowed never to offer welded handles again.

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53 minutes ago, boilsover said:

 

There have been cookware recalls because of this problem set, including a very costly one for the world's largest producer.  The owner of that company has vowed never to offer welded handles again.

 

Which would be who?

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Posted (edited)

Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!

Rivets are a P.I.T A.

But they are strong.

On stainless, I use 'Bar Keepers Friend' and  a denture brush—not a real big deal.

On 'seasoned' stuff, I don't worry much about them beyond a basic scrubbing if necessary.


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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12 hours ago, gfweb said:

Which would be who?

 

Meyer Corporation.

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There are differences between spot welds, tig, mig, arc welding and brazing or silver soldering. I have done all of them except spot welding.  In many of those procedures you're adding metal, but not spot welding. And brazing or welding quality bicycles is an art form, or a artisan craft at least. Even a good plumber has to have some skill soldering copper pipe and knowing about galvanic corrosion with dissimilar materials like galvanized iron and copper. Including clean joints and proper fluxes. 

 

I have seen many spot welds fail. Demeyere spot welds their Atlantis straight sided pans. I can see the (4) spot welds. I have to trust that those Belgians know what they are doing.  But already here, someone has provided an example of a failure. They (Demeyere) may braze their cladded handles, I don't know, but it seems possible.  I've not taken notice.  You'll notice that Fizzler uses many spot welds on their handles, a safer bet if less elegant.  

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Spot welding can work well if it's done right.

A LOT of spot welding work occurred in this county (Chemung [sheh-mung] County, NY) years ago when MANY  fire engines (trucks), fire aerials, and emergency rigs such as ambulance and rescue vehicles were being built by both American LaFrance and Ward LaFrance.

Obviously NOT the type of vehicle one would want to see fall apart—if any!

FWIW,

A spot welding demonstration....

 


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

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Posted (edited)

I have always thought that spot welding works mostly for thin metals.

I wonder if induction welding can work for welding handles to pots and pans.

dcarch 


Edited by dcarch (log)

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Posted (edited)

Some pans are thin metal! :)

The thicker the metal, the more the 'juice!'


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

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I am pretty much weld agnostic but I have had welds fail on cookware.  Never had a rivet fall out though.  I do not suggest screws however.  I once had a screw in my spinach in a restaurant.  Iron and all that.

 

 

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28 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I once had a screw in my spinach in a restaurant.  Iron and all that.

 

The chef screwed up the spinach recipe.

 

dcarch

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8 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I am pretty much weld agnostic but I have had welds fail on cookware.  Never had a rivet fall out though.  I do not suggest screws however.  I once had a screw in my spinach in a restaurant.  Iron and all that.

 

 

I've never had rivets actually fall out, but I've had the rivets get loose enough to make a couple of pots and pans more or less unusable. That's purely on the cheapest and lowest-end of cookware, of course, back in my impecunious bachelor days.

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