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Italy Restaurant Guides (Books)


markk
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Osterie Locanda d'Italia: A Traveller's Guide is the English version of Osterie d'Italia. It faithfully and completely follows the Italian edition. In naming the dishes in each restaurant, it gives some in Italian and some in English. However, there is a 45 page glossary of dishes arranged alphabetically by the Italian name. Therefore I bought both editions so that I would be able to recognize on the restaurant menu the dishes given in English in the guide's listings.

What the English version has that the Italian doesn't are descriptions of many inexpensive bed and breakfasts, small hotels and Agritourismos, many of which charge under 100 euros for a double room. I like my creature comforts, but for the hearty or budget traveler, the guide makes many of these establishments sound enticing.

In Milan I also bought the 2007 editions of Gambero Rosso, Veronelli and Guida de L'Espresso. Using them in concert works the best since each has restaurants that the others don't. If I were to recommend just one of the three, right now it would be the Veronelli. It's the most comprehensive and concentrates on listing many dishes at each restaurant. Regardless, the Osteria guide stands by itself in discovering inexpensive, often hidden local restaurants such that it and one of the three others are what you need to cover the gamut of Italian dining. Its glory is that it documents the density of regionalcentric, tradition-bound family restaurants in Italy, a characteristic that to my way of thinking helps establish Italy as the most gastronomically rich and fascinating country in the Western world.

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Osterie  Locanda d'Italia: A Traveller's Guide is the English version of Osterie d'Italia.

as far as I can tell, the 2007 English version is not out yet. if i'm wrong, i'd love someone to correct me and tell me where I can get it.

h.m.spector

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What the English version has that the Italian doesn't are descriptions of many inexpensive bed and breakfasts, small hotels and Agritourismos, many of which charge under 100 euros for a double room.

Robert, as usual, is quite correct. I chose to buy the Italian version not comparing the two word for word because it is already 6 months out of date and I figured that with translation time, the English one could be even less timely.

Also I'd like to put a plug in for that oft-maligned Michelin; we've eaten at two Bibs that were simply terrific.

as far as I can tell, the 2007 English version is not out yet.

It was available at Feltrinelli in Rome.

Edited by John Talbott to correct spelling of Feltrinelli.

Edited by John Talbott (log)

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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What the English version has that the Italian doesn't are descriptions of many inexpensive bed and breakfasts, small hotels and Agritourismos, many of which charge under 100 euros for a double room.

Robert, as usual, is quite correct. I chose to buy the Italian version not comparing the two word for word because it is already 6 months out of date and I figured that with translation time, the English one could be even less timely.

Also I'd like to put a plug in for that oft-maligned Michelin; we've eaten at two Bibs that were simply terrific.

as far as I can tell, the 2007 English version is not out yet.

It was available at Farinelli [sp] in Rome.

Feltrinelli

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  • 3 weeks later...
Osterie  Locanda d'Italia: A Traveller's Guide is the English version of Osterie d'Italia. It faithfully and completely follows the Italian edition. In naming the dishes in each restaurant, it gives some in Italian and some in English. However, there is a 45 page glossary of dishes arranged alphabetically by the Italian name. Therefore I bought both editions so that I would be able to recognize on the restaurant menu the dishes given in English in the guide's listings.

What the English version has that the Italian doesn't are descriptions of many inexpensive bed and breakfasts, small hotels and Agritourismos, many of which charge under 100 euros for a double room. I like my creature comforts, but for the hearty or budget traveler, the guide makes many of these establishments sound enticing.

I snapped up the new English version last year at the Salone Del Gusto, but I shold let everyone know that many of the restaurants in the Italian Osterie Guide have been left out to make room for the lodging places, therefore if you want the full list of eating places you need to get the Italian version. Slow Food tells me that the 2007 English edition will have more of the osterie included, however Slow by their nature are well ...slow. But if you are a member you can access the list on-line at their site.

Too many restaurants in Piedmont, too little time in life

Villa Sampaguita

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  • 2 weeks later...
Adding a couple more terrific restaurant guides.  (All in Italian):

la Guida Critica Golosa

guida Il Secolo

la Gola in Tasca

la guide de Veronelli

Duemilavini

Buon appetito!

How about Le Soste? www.lesoste.it

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