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Suggest a Baking Book on Tarts

13 posts in this topic

I have come to the realization that I do not enjoy the cakey goodness that so many others have come to love. I hate the frostings and did I mention, the CAKE part?

So... I have been making a lot of tarts lately and I am really enjoying them. I was looking for a few books that are specifally dedicated to making Tarts. I know there are a few out there, but does anyone have any recommendations? Thanks.

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"Book of Tarts:  Form, Function, and Flavor at the City Bakery" by Maury Rubin is a great start.

http://www.amazon.com/Book-Tarts-Form-Func...ie=UTF8&s=books

I strongly second this. His crust recipe is really wonderful.

Two random tart recipes that I've really enjoyed are actually in "The Cook and the Gardener" by Amanda Hesser. The plum tart with a walnut-nutmeg-cream filling is wonderful if you have great plums and the apple tart (caramelized apples weighed down during baking) is very tasty, as well.

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I second 'The Art of The Tart' by Tamasin Day Lewis. Her recipes work and the book is a pleasure to own.

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This isn't specifically devoted to tarts, but Simply Sensational Desserts by Francios Payard has a lot of great tart recipes in it. Highly recommended.

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I like 'Once Upon a Tart' by Frank Mentesana and Jerome Audureau.

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I like 'Once Upon a Tart' by Frank Mentesana and Jerome Audureau.

I, too, love 'Once Upon a Tart'. I had never baked a tart until I bought this book. Very easy and super tasty!

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My first book on this is Martha Stewart's Pies and Tarts, and had great success with her recipes.

I also like the pastry recipes from Sherry Yard and Dorie Greenspan.

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another vote for the martha book. hope it's not out of print...

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I received Book of Tarts by Maury Rubin... I wonder if his shop The City Bakery is still open? Anyhow, the book looks good. Lots of pictures, which I always enjoy when baking. The recipes seem a little too simple, though. Most recipes have 4, maybe 5 max. number of ingredients. White chocolate infused with pear skins is going to be the first recipe I try.

I will check out a few more of the books everyone has mentioned.

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I love the Pie and Pastry Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum. It has a good tart section and teaches you pastry principle and then you go on to make your own fillings. Worth owning.


Lisa K

Lavender Sky

"No one wants black olives, sliced 2 years ago, on a sandwich, you savages!" - Jim Norton, referring to the Subway chain.

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