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Bisquick


snowangel
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I make waffles often. Probably three out of four Saturdays (or in the case of the past week, when the kids had two days off of school, four out of seven days).

I have this neato keeno waffle maker. We can thank Nordicware, creatore of the Bundt pan, for this great product. Think no electrical elements, no cord to get lost, etc., etc.

But, as we've made waffles, we've made all sorts of them. We've done the yeasted thing. Yes, it adds a taste, which not everyone in the family likes, and it does require that one starts it the evening before.

We've tried buttermilk ones. Which, again, requires some pre-thinking on the part of the cook.

But, neither of these have yeilded such a crispy crust as Bisquick, which requires nothing more than deciding that it is time to make waffles.

When I make a pot pie, a Bisquick drop biscuit is the preferred topping.

But, those waffles. Ultimate in crispy. They hold well, and my family is disappointed if I attempt anything else.

But, after waffles this morning, as Peter was breaking the box down for the recycling, he noted the "cheeseburger pie."

Any other Bisquick fans? Anyone done anything other than the waffles or drop biscuits?

(Note: My family gave Bisquick pancakes a BIG thumbs down, and for those, it is worth thinking ahead and either stocking or making buttermilk. Otherwise, as Peter says "you have to deal with that icky Bisquick pancake skin."

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I make waffles often.  Probably three out of four Saturdays (or in the case of the past week, when the kids had two days off of school, four out of seven days).

I have this neato keeno waffle maker.  We can thank Nordicware, creatore of the Bundt pan, for this great product.  Think no electrical elements, no cord to get lost, etc., etc.

But, as we've made waffles, we've made all sorts of them.  We've done the yeasted thing.  Yes, it adds a taste, which not everyone in the family likes, and it does require that one starts it the evening before.

We've tried buttermilk ones.  Which, again, requires some pre-thinking on the part of the cook.

But, neither of these have yeilded such a crispy crust as Bisquick, which requires nothing more than deciding that it is time to make waffles.

When I make a pot pie, a Bisquick drop biscuit is the preferred topping.

But, those waffles.  Ultimate in crispy.  They hold well, and my family is disappointed if I attempt anything else.

But, after waffles this morning, as Peter was breaking the box down for the recycling, he noted the "cheeseburger pie."

Any other Bisquick fans?  Anyone done anything other than the waffles or drop biscuits?

(Note:  My family gave Bisquick pancakes a BIG thumbs down, and for those, it is worth thinking ahead and either stocking or making buttermilk.  Otherwise, as Peter says "you have to deal with that icky Bisquick pancake skin."

I have quite a few 'impossible pie' recipes in Mastercook. If you send me your regular e-mail I'll forward them to you. Some of the recipes actually have the bisquick replaced with a flour, baking powder and melted butter combination that I use in it's place.

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Ironic that this thread should start, I recently came across a yellowed newspaper clipping almost 25 years old with Master mix and six impossible pie variations. Mom gave it to me and it's from the Post Tribune in NW Indiana from August 25, 1982. Has The Master Mix and six variations of impossible pies including a pecan, seafood, bacon, coconut, chicken tamale, and a brunch pie. If Kerry doesn't have one of these variations let me know, I'll be glad to send it.

I had actually thought about offering it to Randi for her cooking for 50 seniors but I thought it might not be just right for that.

Steve, that's a great site.

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Ironic that this thread should start, I recently came across a yellowed newspaper clipping almost 25 years old with Master mix and six impossible pie variations. Mom gave it to me and it's from the Post Tribune in NW Indiana from August 25, 1982. Has The Master Mix and six variations of impossible pies including a pecan, seafood, bacon, coconut, chicken tamale, and a brunch pie.  If Kerry doesn't have one of these variations let me know, I'll be glad to send it.

I had actually thought about offering it to Randi for her cooking for 50 seniors but I thought it might not be just right for that.

Steve, that's a great site.

I'd love to see the pecan and chicken tamale variations.

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This is really scary..

Just two days I was in a store and saw a large box of Bisquick, living in Japan this isn't something I run across often and actually it was the first time I had ever seen it in that store that I frequent often. I picked it up, checking out some of the recipes on the back and considered buying it when I saw it mentioned it could be used for waffles. What runs through my head as I stand there alone in the aisle? What would everybody at eGullet think if this was on my shelf... :sad:

I think I am going back later this week and sticking that box in my cart!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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This is really scary..

Just two days I was in a store and saw a large box of Bisquick, living in Japan this isn't something I run across often and actually it was the first time I had ever seen it in that store that I frequent often. I picked it up, checking out some of the recipes on the back and considered buying it when I saw it mentioned it could be used for waffles. What runs through my head as I stand there alone in the aisle? What would everybody at eGullet think if this was on my shelf... :sad:

I think I am going back later this week and sticking that box in my cart!

We think, "Ooo, what recipes do you have? Is there an obscure Japanese recipe that uses Bisquick?" etc etc etc.

I do have to admit that I occasionally think something along those lines (replace egullet with friends) when I pick up something less then healthful or a box mix of something. I'm known quite well now as "go-to food person" if they are being nice or the foodsnob if they aren't. Sometimes I even get wierd looks if I mention some packaged product or admitting to liking el cheapo american buffets. What can I say? I like food :)

I think I've used bisquick once a long time ago and really have no memory of it. Not something I grew up eating but the waffles sound good so I might have to pick some up.

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I've used the Bisquick low-fat version (yeah - I know. Kinda silly but I try where I can) for biscuits, pancakes and streusel toppings for pie or muffins. It works great. I know I've tried at least one of those back of the box recipes but I don't remember which one.

I have no problem with using boxed, canned or jarred goods and jazzing them up or using them as one of many ingredients in a recipe. I could have been Sandra Lee before she ever existed. Too bad I missed that opportunity. :rolleyes:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Some Bisquick uses (thanks Mom!):

-Dumplings to go with her pork roast and sauerkraut. As a kid I would slather them with butter; as an adult, I enjoy how they soak up the pork roast & sauerkraut juice.

-Used for topping fruit cobblers. It puffs up a little so you get something with substance (lightly sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon) to eat with the fruit cobbler.

-Banana Nut Bread

-Thumbprint biscuits - Biscuits with a thumbprint depression in the top that you filled with jam and then baked. Great with soups and stews.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Some Bisquick uses (thanks Mom!):

-Dumplings to go with her pork roast and sauerkraut. As a kid I would slather them with butter; as an adult, I enjoy how they soak up the pork roast & sauerkraut juice.

-Used for topping fruit cobblers. It puffs up a little so you get something with substance (lightly sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon) to eat with the fruit cobbler.

-Banana Nut Bread

-Thumbprint biscuits - Biscuits with a thumbprint depression in the top that you filled with jam and then baked. Great with soups and stews.

Along with the uses others have mentioned, Bisquick is great for breading things before frying. I did oysters for Christmas and they were great! (PS I love Impossible Pies; I know an upscale chef that makes the zucchni one and puts it in his breadbasket, tells everyone it's his mother's "secret" recipe)

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Kerry and all, I got the Impossible Pecan Pie and the Impossible Chicken Tamale Pie recipe in the recipegullet.

From Northwest Indiana's The Post-Tribune's Family World section C, page 1, dated August 25, 1982 by Janet Burton, post-Tribune Food Editor.

It's been almost 20 years since the recipe for Impossible Coconut Pie surfaced. It didn't take long for the pie to become a sensation at church suppers, and family get-togethers. Passed by word of mouth and recipe exchanges in newspapers, the custard-like pie soon became very popular.

Ideas come and go and after waning for a few years impossible pies are back, adaptable to every course from entrees to dessert. The secret of the pie is the use of prepared biscuit mix which is added to the pie ingredients and forms it's own crust. It's as easy as 1, 2,3 ...beat, pour and bake. It all started with coconut pie...

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I grew up with Bisquick--pancakes, waffles, shortcake, biscuits--every recipe on the back of the box.

I used to take a box camping when the kids were little --for breakfasts.

And the impossible pies were often made then--the quiche was good, and my father in law loved coconut custard pie so i used to make that for him.

It's just as easy now to make up the mixture for whatever, and one less item in my pantry so i don't buy iy any more, but i think it has its uses.

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Bisquick pancakes and waffles are terrible. But, if you're wasted enough, the coffee cake is great. The best thing to do, though, is to get yourself a dutch oven-type thing, fill it with peaches (fresh, if you're a yuppie, canned if you're a Boy Scout insane enough to backpack canned peaches and a dutch oven into the wilderness) some personalized mix of sugars and cinnamon, throw a layer of Bisquick on top and bake yourself a cobbler. Idiot-proof. Delish. Especially served warm with homemade ice cream.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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I grew up with Bisquick--pancakes, waffles, shortcake, biscuits--every recipe on the back of the box.

I used to take a box camping when the kids were little --for breakfasts.

And the impossible pies were often made then--the quiche was good, and my father in law loved coconut custard pie so i used to make that for him.

It's just as easy now to make up the mixture for whatever, and one less item in my pantry so i don't buy iy any more, but i think it has its uses.

Believe it or not, the recipe for waffles is NOT on my box (maybe because it's the 5 lb foodservice size). I was dying to make them this weekend, can you give me any proportions?

Edited by cooleen (log)
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I love the upscale chef story with the zucchini pie.

I know; his sous chef ( a friend of mine) couldn't wait for me to try these unique "bisquits" and the second I saw them, before I even tasted them, I said "These are Impossible Pie". He'd never heard of it, but when he asked the chef, he wouldn't answer so my friend knew I was right!

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I'm another Bisquick-for-waffles fan. I use the low-fat formula and add a fair dose of vanilla.

Have never used it for anything else, but now maybe with the eGullet seal of approval, I'll have to try some of those "impossible" pies! :laugh:

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Impossible Pie all the way! (I don't care that they've renamed it Impossibly Easy Pie, it'll always be Impossible Pie to me.)

In fact, I made one for dinner two nights ago: spam, broccoli, and cheese. I changed the proportions for the pie batter mix to 3 eggs/1 cup milk/1/3 cup Bisquick. It gives a more quiche-like final product, and makes a better "crust" on the bottom and sides in my opinion. I didn't take pictures for the Dinner! thread because it's kind of embarrassing. I also make a great taco beef version.

And shortcakes and topping for cobbler. I didn't know cobbler could have other toppings than Bisquick shortcake dumplings when I was growing up because that's the only way Mom ever made it.

It works great in this beer bread recipe that calls for self-rising flour if I don't have any self-rising flour around.

It's funny because the one thing I don't like Bisquick for is waffles. They come out too crunchy and crisp for me - I prefer my waffles soft and fluffy.

Marcia.

Don't forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he wanted...he lived happily ever after. -- Willy Wonka

eGullet foodblog

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  • 3 months later...
Some of the recipes actually have the bisquick replaced with a flour, baking powder and melted butter combination that I use in it's place.

Does anyone remember the Bisquick "Velvet Crumb Cake"? With the broiled coconut icing on top? Anyway, I'd love to try to duplicate it without the Bisquick (a little too much of a chemical taste in the cake) so if you have the proportions of flour and butter and bp, Kerry, I'd love to know!

Thanks.

kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

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Some of the recipes actually have the bisquick replaced with a flour, baking powder and melted butter combination that I use in it's place.

Does anyone remember the Bisquick "Velvet Crumb Cake"? With the broiled coconut icing on top? Anyway, I'd love to try to duplicate it without the Bisquick (a little too much of a chemical taste in the cake) so if you have the proportions of flour and butter and bp, Kerry, I'd love to know!

Thanks.

Replace 1/2 cup bisquick with 1/2 cup flour, 1 tsp baking powder and 3 to 4 tbsp butter. I'd love to see this velvet crumb cake.

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