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ISI Thermo Whip


ravelda
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Hi all,

Well, I have just taken delivery of my isi themo whip, but am having a tough time finding recipes and knowing where to start creating my own. I would love to hear any of your recipes and ideally a base recipe that I can then add to and alter as I like, much like you may give someone a basic risotto recipe and then let them know when and where they can look to add in other flavours.

Thanks in advance of your help!

David

If a man makes a statement and a woman is not around to witness it, is he still wrong?

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I have a thin, 3-ring binder from iSi titled "Creations with the Gourmet Whip" . Written by Rick Tramonto of Tru, it some recipes for foams, soups, sauces, etc. that helped get me started. His book, "Amuse Bouche", also helped me with some ideas, but once you get the basics, your imagination will be your guide.

Bill/SFNM

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I have a thin, 3-ring binder from iSi titled "Creations with the Gourmet Whip" . Written by Rick Tramonto of Tru, it some recipes for foams, soups, sauces, etc. that helped get me started. His book, "Amuse Bouche", also helped me with some ideas, but once you get the basics, your imagination will be your guide.

Bill/SFNM

I use them a reasonable amount in my kitchen and they really are down to experimenting, as long as the liquid as about the consistancy of double cream, you should be away, heres a couple of ideas

Caramel, 250g sugar to caramel, 250g double cream, 250g milk

Apple reduce 2 litre of apple juice to 1 litre add 4 leaves bronze gelatine

Make a reasonably thick anglaise infused with anything from ginger,star anise, cinnemon

I m doing a rhubarb compote and jelly with ginger foam and pain d'epice crumble where i work as pre dessert!!!

Hope this gives some ideas, let me know

Simon

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Thanks for all the resposnes so far. One area that I am particularly interested in developing is with savoury foams, for example a garlic foam to top a french onion soup, or a cauliflower foam to top scallops, or even a boudin noir foam to go with scallops and a caulifloer puree/cauliflower ravioli

If a man makes a statement and a woman is not around to witness it, is he still wrong?

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David,

One of my favorite savory foams is with roasted red peppers. I make big batches of garlicky "Roasted Red Bell Peppers with Sherry Vinegar" from Jose Andres' book "Tapas - A Taste of Spain in America" which I keep in the fridge for use on sandwiches, pizzas, etc. I make a puree of the peppers along with some of the garlic and olive oil in which they are cooked and combine it with hot cream which I pour into my Thermo Whip. This stuff tastes good on anything - maybe even corn flakes! :biggrin:

Bill/SFNM

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David,

One of my favorite savory foams is with roasted red peppers. I make big batches of garlicky "Roasted Red Bell Peppers with Sherry Vinegar" from Jose Andres' book "Tapas - A Taste of Spain in America" which I keep in the fridge for use on sandwiches, pizzas, etc.  I make a puree of the peppers along with some of the garlic and olive oil in which they are cooked and combine it with hot cream which I pour into my Thermo Whip. This stuff tastes good on anything - maybe even corn flakes!  :biggrin:

Bill/SFNM

Damn Bill,

That sounds awesome.

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Bill, great idea - I will deffinately have a go at that. I am quite looking forward to trying out the boudin noir foam idea with scallops and I have now decided taht it will have to be with a cauliflower ravioli. I have also checked out the ISI website, but there is nothing too inspirational there.

A question on savoury sources, how thich should the puree that goes into the ISI be, and also, do I need any form of stabilizer?

If a man makes a statement and a woman is not around to witness it, is he still wrong?

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Bill, great idea - I will deffinately have a go at that. I am quite looking forward to trying out the boudin noir foam idea with scallops and I have now decided taht it will have to be with a cauliflower ravioli. I have also checked out the ISI website, but there is nothing too inspirational there.

A question on savoury sources, how thich should the puree that goes into the ISI be, and also, do I need any form of stabilizer?

If a man makes a statement and a woman is not around to witness it, is he still wrong?

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Bill, great idea - I will deffinately have a go at that.  I am quite looking forward to trying out the boudin noir foam idea with scallops and I have now decided taht it will have to be with a cauliflower ravioli.  I have also checked out the ISI website, but there is nothing too inspirational there. 

A question on savoury sources, how thich should the puree that goes into the ISI be, and also, do I need any form of stabilizer?

Really Ravelda,every ingredient is different, but majority of thetime you dont need a stabilizer

Try it with mayonnaise or aioli on there own nothing added, great as a canepe with some home made crisps/chips

Pomme Puree is also very intresing!!!

I m giving all my ideas away now

where do you cook?

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Indeed every ingredient is different. As long as you've got a relatively loose puree of root veg, roasted veg, greens, etc you'll be fine, even for hot foams.

Where you run into problems is in the hot foaming of things that don't really hold as purees that well. I've been playing with a blue cheese foam that I can't quite get right. By heating, even with a hefty dose of heavy cream, the mixture does not want to hold air. That's where you need to get into gelling agents that will create a loose fluid gel that will pour but still be viscous hold air. You can use some of the same stalbilizers in smaller amounts to help "normal" foams hold air for longer periods of time.

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Indeed every ingredient is different.  As long as you've got a relatively loose puree of root veg, roasted veg, greens, etc you'll be fine, even for hot foams. 

Where you run into problems is in the hot foaming of things that don't really hold as purees that well.  I've been playing with a blue cheese foam that I can't quite get right.  By heating, even with a hefty dose of heavy cream, the mixture does not want to hold air.  That's where you need to get into gelling agents that will create a loose fluid gel that will pour but still be viscous hold air.  You can use some of the same stalbilizers in smaller amounts to help "normal" foams hold air for longer periods of time.

Bryan,

I've had success with the Blue Cheese foam from Tramonto's Amuse-Bouche. The cream is boiled, removed from heat, and crumbled blue cheese is added and the mixture is pureed with an immersion blender or in a food processor. It is then strained through a chinois and seasoned. Allow to cool and pour into a the chilled ThermoWhip. Chill for 2 hours. Before dispensing, I shake vigorously, but this may be an altitude thing. Outstanding with his port wine reduction sauce.

You've probably tried this method, but I've never had a problem with this foam holding air.

Bill/SFNM

Edited by Bill/SFNM (log)
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Indeed every ingredient is different.  As long as you've got a relatively loose puree of root veg, roasted veg, greens, etc you'll be fine, even for hot foams. 

Where you run into problems is in the hot foaming of things that don't really hold as purees that well.  I've been playing with a blue cheese foam that I can't quite get right.  By heating, even with a hefty dose of heavy cream, the mixture does not want to hold air.  That's where you need to get into gelling agents that will create a loose fluid gel that will pour but still be viscous hold air.  You can use some of the same stalbilizers in smaller amounts to help "normal" foams hold air for longer periods of time.

Bryan,

I've had success with the Blue Cheese foam from Tramonto's Amuse-Bouche. The cream is boiled, removed from heat, and crumbled blue cheese is added and the mixture is pureed with an immersion blender or in a food processor. It is then strained through a chinois and seasoned. Allow to cool and pour into a the chilled ThermoWhip. Chill for 2 hours. Before dispensing, I share vigorously, but this may be an altitude thing. Outstanding with his port wine reduction sauce.

You've probably tried this method, but I've never had a problem with this foam holding air.

Bill/SFNM

What is with the altitude bill, sounds intresting where are you based?

Simon

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Indeed every ingredient is different.  As long as you've got a relatively loose puree of root veg, roasted veg, greens, etc you'll be fine, even for hot foams. 

Where you run into problems is in the hot foaming of things that don't really hold as purees that well.  I've been playing with a blue cheese foam that I can't quite get right.  By heating, even with a hefty dose of heavy cream, the mixture does not want to hold air.  That's where you need to get into gelling agents that will create a loose fluid gel that will pour but still be viscous hold air.  You can use some of the same stalbilizers in smaller amounts to help "normal" foams hold air for longer periods of time.

Bryan,

I've had success with the Blue Cheese foam from Tramonto's Amuse-Bouche. The cream is boiled, removed from heat, and crumbled blue cheese is added and the mixture is pureed with an immersion blender or in a food processor. It is then strained through a chinois and seasoned. Allow to cool and pour into a the chilled ThermoWhip. Chill for 2 hours. Before dispensing, I shake vigorously, but this may be an altitude thing. Outstanding with his port wine reduction sauce.

You've probably tried this method, but I've never had a problem with this foam holding air.

Bill/SFNM

The problem is making it hot. Which makes it difficult for cream to hold air and for the use of gelatin as a thickener. Experiments with xanthan have been less than successful; I need to use something stronger.

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If you want a starter guide to some of the things to do with your whipper, you might take a look at The Cooks Book edited by Jill Norman. The starring attraction is a chapter by Ferran Adria on foams – it must be the least expensive access to some elBulli favourites!

I often use the whipper in combination with a Thermomix. Works really well as I can put, say, the ingredients for a hot mayonnaise foam in the Thermomix. When I’m ready to serve, I blitz at 70C for 2 minutes, filter the sauce into the whipper, charge shake and spray. All this takes less than 5 minutes and I don’t have to bother about making a bain marie to keep the contents of the whipper warm.

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If you want a starter guide to some of the things to do with your whipper, you might take a look at The Cooks Book edited by Jill Norman.  The starring attraction is a chapter by Ferran Adria on foams – it must be the least expensive access to some elBulli favourites!

I often use the whipper in combination with a Thermomix.  Works really well as I can put, say, the ingredients for a hot mayonnaise foam in the Thermomix.  When I’m ready to serve, I blitz at 70C for 2 minutes, filter the sauce into the whipper, charge shake and spray.  All this takes less than 5 minutes and I don’t have to bother about making a bain marie to keep the contents of the whipper warm.

I ve not tried that before baggy i ll look into it, so i d imagine you do that when the first check comes on then keep warm?

where you cooking?

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Chefsimon – sorry to disappoint but I’m only a keen home cook.

I have been trying out some of the el Bulli recipes when friends come round – with the bite sized dishes and no commis I have to prep like mad. I tend to fill the Thermomix at the last stages of prep, maybe an hour before I want to make the sauce, and it takes a lot of anxiety out of the last minute things.

If you get the opportunity to look at The Cooks Book, I can say that the gin fizz (basically a sour made of gin/lemon granita and topped with a hot gin/lemon/egg white foam) is spectacularly good. I have been using it as one of the appetisers (usually do 2 amuse, 2 appetisers, 2 entrees, 2 desserts as a standard). But hot foamed mayonnaise with asparagus and asparagus sorbet is another absolute favourite for taste and surprise (another el Bulli dish).

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Thanks all for all your ideas. I was away most of the weekend, but did have a good old play with the ISI over the weekend. I am going to give my boudin noir foam a go this weekend, I really thank that it will be a fantastic combo with scallops and a cauliflower ravioli, some of my favourite ingredients.

As for where I work chefsimon, it is a long and rather complicated story, but although not my main trade (I am a banker!) I have done a number of stages at some of our top restaurants here in the UK and work every weekend (for free) in a restaurant called le vacherin in London (www.levacherin.co.uk)

If a man makes a statement and a woman is not around to witness it, is he still wrong?

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Chefsimon – sorry to disappoint but I’m only a keen home cook. 

I have been trying out some of the el Bulli recipes when friends come round – with the bite sized dishes and no commis I have to prep like mad.  I tend to fill the Thermomix at the last stages of prep, maybe an hour before I want to make the sauce, and it takes a lot of anxiety out of the last minute things.

If you get the opportunity to look at The Cooks Book, I can say that the gin fizz (basically a sour made of gin/lemon granita and topped with a hot gin/lemon/egg white foam) is spectacularly good.  I have been using it as one of the appetisers (usually do 2 amuse, 2 appetisers, 2 entrees, 2 desserts as a standard).  But hot foamed mayonnaise with asparagus and asparagus sorbet is another absolute favourite for taste and surprise (another el Bulli dish).

If thats what your offerring at home baggy mayb you should by a restaurant!!!!!

i like the sound of your dinner parties!!

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Thanks all for all your ideas.  I was away most of the weekend, but did have a good old play with the ISI over the weekend.  I am going to give my boudin noir foam a go this weekend, I really thank that it will be a fantastic combo with scallops and a cauliflower ravioli, some of my favourite ingredients.

As for where I work chefsimon, it is a long and rather complicated story, but although not my main trade (I am a banker!) I have done a number of stages at some of our top restaurants here in the UK and work every weekend (for free) in a restaurant called le vacherin in London (www.levacherin.co.uk)

I have defianatly heard of it, all good things to but never been there, its just up the road from me in surrey so i should make a visit in the future, where else have you been doing stages,I once had a politician guy of some sort use to work weekends for me in bray, then he became a chef, now hes a policeman!!!

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  • 1 year later...
One of my favorite savory foams is with roasted red peppers. I make big batches of garlicky "Roasted Red Bell Peppers with Sherry Vinegar" from Jose Andres' book "Tapas - A Taste of Spain in America" which I keep in the fridge for use on sandwiches, pizzas, etc.  I make a puree of the peppers along with some of the garlic and olive oil in which they are cooked and combine it with hot cream which I pour into my Thermo Whip. This stuff tastes good on anything - maybe even corn flakes!  :biggrin:

Bill/SFNM

I tried to make a foam similar to this, using roasted red peppers and whipping cream (35% fat) on the weekend, and found that I could only dispense about half of what was in the canister. (Though I liked the flavour of what I could dispense!) Could anyone give me a rough guide to a good proportion of peppers to cream? And should I be using all whipping cream for this type of application, or a combination of whipping cream and something lighter? Thanks in advance!

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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  • 4 weeks later...

I know this is OT, but the search engine being what it is (that wasn't a bit of moaning - I swear!) I figured I'd ask here:

I'm looking to buy my first whip, and from the research I've done, it would seem like the cost of a 1 pint unit is only marginally cheaper than the 1 quart unit. Is there any reason you all can see for me to go with the smaller one? (example: Will the cost of the cartridges to operate the small version offset the operational costs of the whole shebang?)

Come to think of it, things I've come across don't mention the size of the unit. They say things like 'charge with 2 cartridges'. Are these guidelines referring to the 1 quart size? I'm thinking probably...

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Yes, you do need twice as many cartridges to operate the quart size as you do for the pint size. Some recipes require you to charge with 2 cartridges in the pint size and 4 in the quart size, but this is usually stated in the recipe. (If the recipe doesn't explicitly state the size it was designed for, you can usually infer from the size of the batch and scale accordingly.)

The other question you need to ask yourself is what your intended application is. I'm a home user with a pint-size ThermoWhip, and I've never managed to exhaust the entire supply of any foam in one evening. I can't imagine how long a quart-size batch of any foam base would last me. If you're serving several dozen covers in a night, the quart size makes sense, but if not, you're going to end up eating or serving a lot of the same foam over a relatively short period of time. It might make sense in a restaurant setting, but can get tiresome at home.

Speaking of which, would you like some of the tangerine foam I've got kicking around in my fridge from New Year's Eve? :hmmm:

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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