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Lemons and Limes: The Topic


amapola
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15 minutes ago, JohnT said:

It looks very similar to an Assam lemon which originates from the Assam region of India. See if you can find it on Google. Have a look at http://citruspages.free.fr/lemons.html#longilimon

 

Maybe. Though with China and India's frosty relationship, I wonder how they would end up here.

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Because they originated from the Assam region, it does not mean the ones you purchased are now grown there - they could now be grown locally in China or anywhere else in the world. Two years ago we had very similar looking lemons in one of our local fruit & veg. shops that are produced on our west coast region. I never saw them last year but will look out for them this year - the first crop of lemons this year are now starting to appear on the shelves and I will keep my eye open for them. For all we know, those could come from South Africa as we are exporting ship loads of citrus to China at the moment.

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35 minutes ago, Lisa Shock said:

Looks like some sort of lime to me. Most limes, when really ripe, turn partially yellow. -Not as yellow as a lemon, but, yellow enough that people often can't figure out what sort of tree they have in their yard here in Arizona.

 

That was my first thought, but they definitely taste of lemon, rather than lime. I have studied the lemon-lime conundrum in great detail (it's a huge problem here) and written about it a lot.

I'm getting ready for a three-day business trip to Hong Kong, so will say more about that when I'm back. Thanks for taking the time to reply.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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1 hour ago, JohnT said:

For all we know, those could come from South Africa as we are exporting ship loads of citrus to China at the moment.

 

Interesting. I've never seen any fruit (or anything else) here identified as South African. Most of the fruit here is local or from Hainan or imported from nearby Vietnam. It may be different in other parts of China.

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1 hour ago, Lisa Shock said:

Looks like some sort of lime to me. Most limes, when really ripe, turn partially yellow. -Not as yellow as a lemon, but, yellow enough that people often can't figure out what sort of tree they have in their yard here in Arizona.

 

Hold the front page!

 

I've just re-tasted one and I think you may be right. It's a lime or a lime/lemon cross. My first taste test was on one straight from the fridge, which I guess muted the flavor. It now tastes decidedly lime-ish. Although It still looks like a lemon. More experimentation when I get back.

 

BTW, the shop had no idea what they were.

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Just now, pastryani said:

 

Hmm then I guess this is different.  See below for pics of the lime "caviar".

 

http://www.gourmantic.com/2015/03/03/finger-limes/

 

 

Thanks for the picture links. Very interesting. But not what I have, sadly.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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Well those just look awesome, whatever they are.

I think they are likely Assam lemons--The last time I saw them, I think I was in NYC buying an etrog and they were nearby.

Assam lemons seem like citrons to my nose--the peel is wonderfully perfumed and maybe thats the Chinese slang.

 

 

Less likely, maybe this:  http://idtools.org/id/citrus/citrusid/factsheet.php?name=Faustrimedin

 

 

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  • 6 years later...

Never again shall I permit a bag of lovely and expensive lemons to liquify and grow gray green and fuzzy in the hydrator.  So much for tonight's warmly anticipated Mississippi punch.  (Admittedly worse eventualities in life than having to make do with a mai tai.)

 

Topic of discussion:  why does Penicillium quickly despoil my lemon stash whereas I have never, ever, ever in my life experienced a rotten lime?

 

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6 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Topic of discussion:  why does Penicillium quickly despoil my lemon stash whereas I have never, ever, ever in my life experienced a rotten lime?

 

My experience as well.  Do you think the ones you get have that wax coating we used to get on fruit? My home grown ones, when I had the kuxury, were ony picked as needed for use. Niece bought a bag of juicy lemons I put in a lovely crystal bowl. Walked out after a week " stinky one contaminating the kitchen. 

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9 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Never again shall I permit a bag of lovely and expensive lemons to liquify and grow gray green and fuzzy in the hydrator.  So much for tonight's warmly anticipated Mississippi punch.  (Admittedly worse eventualities in life than having to make do with a mai tai.)

 

Topic of discussion:  why does Penicillium quickly despoil my lemon stash whereas I have never, ever, ever in my life experienced a rotten lime?

 

Husband Ed and I meet every morning to discuss the day's agenda.  On my "Food" paper, I keep a running list (messy) of vegetable and fruit items on hand, just so that this kind of thing does not occur.  And it's worked out very well.

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12 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Topic of discussion:  why does Penicillium quickly despoil my lemon stash whereas I have never, ever, ever in my life experienced a rotten lime?

 

Thinner skin/less pith?  Limes will turn brown, but the skin just dries out.  'Baby' lemons tend to have thinner skin too.  Thicker pith may retain moisture & sustain life better?

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14 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

 

Thinner skin/less pith?  Limes will turn brown, but the skin just dries out.  'Baby' lemons tend to have thinner skin too.  Thicker pith may retain moisture & sustain life better?

 

I'd say limes have less pith.  Could it be a difference in pH?

 

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4 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

I'd say limes have less pith.

 

That's what I meant.  That the fluffy damp thicker pith of lemons and oranges is a better media on which grow mold etc.

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18 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

 

Topic of discussion:  why does Penicillium quickly despoil my lemon stash whereas I have never, ever, ever in my life experienced a rotten lime?

 

Of course, it has nothing to do with the fact that you run through limes much more quickly than lemons?   That penicillium hasn't a chance in your lime bowl.

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I'm going with the fluffy damp pith hypothesis. All I know is from experience. Lemons grow greenish gray mold and get softer. Limes just get hard as rocks when left to themselves. Very different.

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I agree there's a good argument for the thicker lemon pith providing a better barrier to the acidic juice vs limes and the acid should inhibit mold growth.

Additionally, your average lime sold in groceries is picked when quite underripe.  Most limes will turn yellow when completely ripe. At that point, they will be more sweet, juicy and also more prone to damage. I have a  lime tree, generally let them hang on the tree until fully ripe and I feel like I've had some go moldy when I've picked big batches to give away but I usually just pick what I need so maybe I'm misremembering the mold situation. 

 

I'm attempting to make some dried limes (black limes, Omani limes, limoo Omani, etc.) using the recipe in The Food of Oman.  I think smaller limes like Mexican limes or Key limes tend to be used for this vs the bigger Persian or Bearss limes that I have on my tree. It's only been about a week but no mold, so far. I threw in a couple of lemons and they're not moldy either but we'll see. 

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Regarding lemons (backyard tree):  I have only really experienced mold on stored lemons that were bruised/bounced/touched the ground.

I have found that untouched lemons with go soft, but not moldy.

Edited by lemniscate (log)
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Will never again leave Meyer lemons on the tree too long.    Last year, I went out to pick a few and found that (apparently) rats had stripped the peel off every ripe lemon.   Mr. Google confirmed that they do find the peel delicious, while leaving the completely peeled fruit hanging on the tree.   Of course we composted the molested fruit.    This year, I am watching like a hawk.

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2 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Will never again leave Meyer lemons on the tree too long.    Last year, I went out to pick a few and found that (apparently) rats had stripped the peel off every ripe lemon.   Mr. Google confirmed that they do find the peel delicious, while leaving the completely peeled fruit hanging on the tree.   Of course we composted the molested fruit.    This year, I am watching like a hawk.

 

Some people go through a lot of work to peel a lemon.

 

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On 2/25/2007 at 11:55 AM, JAZ said:

In my old neighborhood, I got spoiled buying citrus -- I could almost always buy lemons at 5/$1 and limes for half that. The quality wasn't always the best, but even when they were a little old, they seemed to have lots of juice. Now, not only are lemons and limes really expensive, but I seem to be running into a depressing number of dried out fruit -- limes especially.

I wonder why that is, but more important, I wonder if there are reliable ways to predict which fruit will be the juiciest. From casual observation, it seems to me that the driest limes have had really dark, rough skin, but I don't know if this is an indicator, or merely a coincidence. It certainly doesn't seem to be the case that old limes are drier -- I've used limes (and lemons) with spots that are quite juicy. In fact, once in a while, I've cut into one that's actually started to turn brown inside -- I haven't used them, but they seem to still have plenty of juice left.

With lemons, it seems to be a different story. I rarely find lemons that are dried out in the same way as limes (oranges also seem to suffer from desiccation), but I have bought more than a few that have such thick skins that the actual fruit is tiny and thus produces very little juice. I try to get lemons that give a little with pressure, but then sometimes that backfires and I end up with a spoiled one.

So, essentially, I'm at a loss. Anyone have tried and true methods for estimating juice content for citrus fruit?

 

I avoid limes with dark rough skin like monkey pox or plague.  Nothing good shall ever come of them.  For juicy limes I look for smooth skin, but I don't worry much about the color (unless brown and scrofulous), as I aspire to have at least a dozen fruits ripening in my bedroom at one time.  And typically (like tonight) I purchase limes several times a week.

 

Lemons are my nemesis.  And any oranges I don't use up at once shall surely rot.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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