Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Pacific Northwest-Themed Cookbooks


scarlett
 Share

Recommended Posts

We have the Rover's book and the Tom Douglas book up on the bookshelf somewhere, but I don't think we've cooked out of them...

I can recommend the Macrina cookbook, though. Simple, easy, and tasty recipes. I especially like the chocolate sour cherry pound cake and the buttermilk biscuits. I made the ham and romano cheese biscuits as well this week (with a few mods--lots of black pepper and herbs), and they were proclaimed a hit at a brunch potluck. (I personally much prefer the plain buttermilk biscuits, though.) Lots of brunchy items in the last section of the book too, so it's not strictly a cookie and cake book. :smile:

Edited by Ling (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For the Portland touch - Wildwood, if you can still find it. The odd thing about it is that there are no beef recipes, but anything I have made from it has been excellent. He's the real deal.

I like Tom's first book (the only one I have cooked from.) I second Macrina (she was on TV last night, mixing up lemon chrry poundcake for Paula's sons on Road Traveled.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tom Douglas' first book is fantastic! We've made at least half of the things in there and all but one has garnered rave reviews. I've given it to a few people who also love it. It's not fancy stuff- just good, hearty everyday meals.

The Rovers book is quite a bit different in feel as you can imagine- ingrediants like foie gras, caviar and the like are popular. I like the things we've made out of it too but it's not your mon-thurs cooking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Greg Atkinson's (former executive chef at Canlis) books are nice, with easy recipes. I think it's his book "In Season" that has the to die for strawberry shortcake recipe that my husband requests every year during strawberry season.

(and raspberry season... and peach season...)

Edited by beauxbrie (log)
"Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food." -- Hippocrates
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't laugh, but I have a big collection of Sunset Magazine cookbooks. They do a recipe annual every year, and there's a couple "Best of Sunset" cookbooks that I like better. The books, especially the photos, might seem a little dated (I love the ones from the eighties), but they're very Northwest oriented with local ingredients, info on local producers, and historical stuff, like why we eat cedar planked salmon. Easy to find and cheap in area used bookstores.

Greg Atkinson's new West Coast Cooking is also great, and very thorough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

These are great recommendations. In fact, I have a couple of these books myself, but haven't cooked from them. I'm glad others are enjoying them...it makes me want to take a closer look!

I was wondering....I'm not very familiar with chefs out of Portland and Vancouver, BC. Are there any cookbook authors that haven't been mentioned here yet? Is there anyone else worth looking into?

Edited by scarlett (log)

Traca

Seattle, WA

blog: Seattle Tall Poppy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have the Lumiere book, the Feenie's book, and the Lumiere Tasting bar book. I've cooked out of all of them, but I know some of the recipes were adapted for the home cook.

Vikram Vij just came out with a book recently, and that might be worth checking out. The recipes look promising.

Karen Barnaby also has a few popular cookbooks out, and there's the La Regalade cookbook from the popular French bistro as well. The Karen Barnaby cookbooks are filled with everyday recipes, nothing fancy...but tasty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dungeness Crabs And Blackberry Cobblers: The Northwest Heritage Cookbook, by Janie Hibler, is part of the excellent Knopf Cooks American series. Definitely worth a look. Not particularly contemporary, but very well done.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pacific Northwest: The Beautiful Cookbook is nice. Recipes by Kathy Casey, and lots of photos.

Greg Atkinson's newest book, _West Coast Cooking_ covers the whole coast from Alaska to Mexico, but I think it would be perfect for a cook new to the area and looking for inspiration.

Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've also cooked out of both of Tom Douglas's cookbooks and especially love his first book. I've also used a few of Caprial's recipes and enjoyed them.

Another book that's great is "West Coast Seafood: The Complete Cookbook"

by Jay Harlow. It has almost everything you'd want to know about seafood (although it's the entire west coast, not just the PNW).

Jan

Seattle, WA

"But there's tacos, Randy. You know how I feel about tacos. It's the only food shaped like a smile....A beef smile."

--Earl (Jason Lee), from "My Name is Earl", Episode: South of the Border Part Uno, Season 2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dungeness Crabs And Blackberry Cobblers: The Northwest Heritage Cookbook, by Janie Hibler, is part of the excellent Knopf Cooks American series. Definitely worth a look. Not particularly contemporary, but very well done.

I second this recommendation. I have this book and especially love the historical notes included on each page.

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>I bought the Junior League of Seattle book CELEBRATE THE RAIN because it was so highly touted on another web site. So far I haven't made anything from it ...has anyone else?

I have not done the cooking, but my friend loves this book and so I have eaten several dishes. It's a good one, toon, much more geared to everyday cooking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

These are great recommendations everyone. Thank you! I have a feeling I'm going to be doing a little cookbook shopping now too!

By the way, if any of you have the Tom Douglas "Big Dinner's" cookbook, the Chinese clams are delish. I get serious cravings for that dish. (Sadly, so far, that's the only stand out for me in that book)

I also have the Feenie's book and have really enjoyed everything I've made from it. It's the kind of book that if I lost it, I'm sure I'd buy another copy.

The Traunfeld books are real winners. I've enjoyed every recipe I've tried. Many of the recipes are so easy and yet deliver such great flavor. Amazing.

I've see several folks mentioned they liked Tom Douglas' "Seattle Kitchen." Can you point me to which recipes you enjoyed the most?

Traca

Seattle, WA

blog: Seattle Tall Poppy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

These are great recommendations everyone.  Thank you!  I have a feeling I'm going to be doing a little cookbook shopping now too!

By the way, if any of you have the Tom Douglas "Big Dinner's" cookbook, the Chinese clams are delish.  I get serious cravings for that dish.  (Sadly, so far, that's the only stand out for me in that book)

I also have the Feenie's book and have really enjoyed everything I've made from it.  It's the kind of book that if I lost it, I'm sure I'd buy another copy.

The Traunfeld books are real winners.  I've enjoyed every recipe I've tried.  Many of the recipes are so easy and yet deliver such great flavor.  Amazing.

I've see several folks mentioned they liked Tom Douglas' "Seattle Kitchen."  Can you point me to which recipes you enjoyed the most?

There are so many but in Seattle Kitchen some of our favorites are (going from memory so the titles won't be exact) the corn bread pudding, the mustard prime rib, the trout with apple cider butter, the grilled bread salad, mussels with sake ginger butter, maple cured pork chops, benegal spiced lamb, short ribs, the lentils, winter salad...............................damn I really do use this book!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, I often just "refer" to the recipes, so can't say I've actually made some of them. That said, I've "made" the maple brined pork chops with the polenta side, the corn bread pudding, the sauteed lemon chard side, the mashed potatoes (sooooo good!) and the winter salad has become a staple recipe for me...love the lemony, bitter, truffley goodness!

*edited to add: Oops!, sorry, forgot to say I was referring to the Tom Douglas' Seattle Kitchen cookbook.

Edited by SeaGal (log)

Jan

Seattle, WA

"But there's tacos, Randy. You know how I feel about tacos. It's the only food shaped like a smile....A beef smile."

--Earl (Jason Lee), from "My Name is Earl", Episode: South of the Border Part Uno, Season 2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've see several folks mentioned they liked Tom Douglas' "Seattle Kitchen."  Can you point me to which recipes you enjoyed the most?

There are so many but in Seattle Kitchen some of our favorites are (going from memory so the titles won't be exact) the corn bread pudding, the mustard prime rib, the trout with apple cider butter, the grilled bread salad, mussels with sake ginger butter, maple cured pork chops, benegal spiced lamb, short ribs, the lentils, winter salad...............................damn I really do use this book!!!

Oooh, don't forget the roasted tomatillo salsa. Yum!

Practice Random Acts of Toasting

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ditto to all the rec's above, TD and Atkinson are great. I prefer John Sarich to Kathy Casey, and adore Traunfeld's "Herbfarm Cookbook", BUT I still haven't seen anyone mention one of my favorites: "Kingston Hotel Cafe Cookbook" by Judith Weinstock. Really inspring PNW recipes broken down by season -- really love her Grilled Salmon with Miso-Orange-Cilantro glaze and Hazelnut Torte with Chocolate-Rum buttercream (though I prefer to fill mine with raspberry bc and then glaze the torte with the chocolate-rum glaze.)

I also like "Northwest Food & Wine" by Dan & kathleen Taggart, my Fran Bigelow ("Pure Chocolate"), Dana Taylor Davenport ("The Dilettante Book of Chocolate and Confections"), and Cafe Flora cookbooks.

Funny...I saw a rec for "Celebrate the Rain" somewhere, bought it, and haven't cooked anything from it either! :laugh:

Luscious smell like love

Essential black milk worship

It whispers to me...

...Chocolate

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By ojisan
      Does anyone have any thoughts about Alice Waters' new "40 Years of Chez Panisse"? Not a recipe cookbook - more of a memoir/history/picture book.
    • By Rushina
      What would you like to be included in a cookbook you classify as a "good cookbook"?
      Rushina
    • By Multiwagon
      Other than the three written by Michael Ruhlman, which I have read and loved, what other books are out there that are about cooking, but not cookbooks?
    • By OliverB
      I just received a copy of "The Cook's Book - Concise Edition" edited by Jill Norman, and now I'm curious, what's the difference to the full edition? Supposedly it has 648 pages compared to 496 in this edition, and it appears to be much larger in size if the info on us.dk.com is correct. Other than that I can't find any info what the difference might be. It's a neat book with lots of photos about techniques etc, and lots of recipes. As with any DK book production values are high.
      If the contents are the same, I'm happy with the smaller version, but I'd really like to know what I might be missing on those 150 or so pages. If it's just filler, I don't care. If it's some fantastic recipes, I do care....
      Anybody here know both editions? Google was so far of no help. Lots of the full edition are to be had used as well, I'd be happy giving this one as a gift and ordering the full edition, if it's worth it.
      Thanks!
      Oliver
    • By devlin
      Say you were rounded up with a group of folks and either had a skill to offer in exchange for a comfy room and some other niceties or were sent off to a slag heap to toil away in the hot sun every day for 16 hours, what 3 books would you want to take with you to enable you to cook and bake such fabulous foodstuffs that your kidnappers would keep you over some poor schlub who could cook only beans and rice and the occasional dry biscuit?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...