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Blue Cheesecake


Patricia Austin
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Has anyone ever made a Blue Cheesecake??

Maybe it would be more on the savory side?

I've had a request for it from a new wine shop in town and I have not seen a recipe for one that I remember . . . but there must be something out there.

Let me know if you have any ideas.

Thanks.

Patricia

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I googled and found this sweet one. I was surprised.

http://www.canneryseafood.com/recipes/month_01.html

I remember making a savory one years ago and Lord only knows where that recipe went. Seems like I remember it having a ground up triscuit crust. I never made it again because it was very strong. I'll see if I can dig it up though.

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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THIS is my go to recipe for a savory cheesecake. It's delicious. I've never had a crumb of leftovers when I've served it. I'm certain you could substitute in a little bit of Gorgonzola dolce or something in place of part of the mascarpone if you wanted. I also agree about layering the sundried tomatoes and the pesto separately. It looks prettier and isn't really that much more work.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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One of my all-time favorite restaurant desserts is (was) from a local restaurant called Ambrozia.

It was a gorgonzola cheesecake on a 'normal' graham crust, the sweet of the cheesecake complementing the salt and tanginess of the cheese.

Plating was done with candied walnuts, crispy dried apple slices and some type of a caramel sauce. But the walnuts & apples were awesome flavor complements to the gorgonzola. Everything came together really well.

Mmmmm.... Here's a recipe, though not from Ambrozia: Gorgonzola Cheesecake.

It was replaced by a goat cheese cheesecake which was fine but not the same. There is no cheesecake on the menu currently.

Andrea

http://andrealin.vox.com

"You can't taste the beauty and energy of the Earth in a Twinkie." - Astrid Alauda

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Food Lovers' Guide to Santa Fe, Albuquerque & Taos: OMG I wrote a book. Woo!

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O.K. Excellent, so I could go sweet or savory. I love the idea of candied walnuts, apple slices (or pears)and caramel. The savory side sounds really good but what I offer professionally is the sweet side, so I'm leaning that way. I'm sure there is a place for Triscuits but they have always scared me (like shrunken salted shredded wheat cereal biscuits).

I wonder if the blue in the Gorgonzola would dissapear after baking. The tricky part seems to be in finding the right amount of tanginess without overwhelming the palate with that blue zing.

Thanks for the recipe ideas!

Patricia

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I regularly make one based on the Oregon Blue Cheesecake from the Northwest Best Places cookbook.

Rough recipe:

1 lb cream cheese

1/2 lb blue cheese

6 oz sour cream (laughably, I use Tillamook low fat)

1/4 cup flour

1/4 tsp salt

1/4 cup chives or 1/2 cup scallions, chopped

1-2 tsp fresh herbs, finely chopped - I use thyme (2tsp) or rosemary (1 tsp) or whatever strikes my fancy.

1 cup ground crackers, nuts, etc - Goldfish work, as do hazelnuts, and lots of things in between. Depends on your audience. This is divided and half is sprinkled on the buttered pan, the other half on top of the unbaked cheesecake. The original recipe uses cheese crackers on the bottom and walnuts on top. I vary this along with the herbs.

Butter 9-10 springform or tart pan and sprinkle with half of the ground crunchy stuff.

Mix rest of ingredients until smooth. This is easiest using a mixer, although you can do it by hand or pulse the mixture briefly in food processor. Pour into prepared pan. Bake at 325 for ~45 min, until set. Cool to room temp and refrigerate for at least 6 hours.

I usually serve this with baguettes (usually Pain la Ancienne) and this wonderful Blueberry Habanero Chutney that I've always got on hand.

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When I was reading your recipe, kitchenmage, I had this vision of piping this into a hollowed out baby beet or a mushroom cap.

Have you ever tried that?

I think I might have to do that for a superbowl party....

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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When I was reading your recipe, kitchenmage, I had this vision of piping this into a hollowed out baby beet or a mushroom cap.

Have you ever tried that?

No, but now that you have thought of it, I may have to. (where is the damned "drooling" smilie???)

This has become one of my go-to appetizer/potluck dishes. The components (bread, cheesecake, chutney) end up getting swapped in with other dishes too, which is always amusing. I knew this was a great thing the first time I took one to a party (sleepover Saturnalia bash at a friend's B&B) and could overhear "OMG! Have you tried the chutney with that?" and, in response, "...and the cheesecake with that...!" from the next room. (I have no idea what they were pointing at, but I swear that many a combination was tried and they were mostly very, very good...)

In theory, this is a 20-24 serving recipe - in my experience, if you have up to a dozen people it will disappear without anyone feeling cheated. With more people than that, I'd make extra.

Let me know how the mushrooms turn out.

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Let me know how the mushrooms turn out.

I was thinking of trying the baby beets first, if I can find them

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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you know, if you left out the flour, this would be a neat dip.

I was expecting eggs...does this rise much?

Yeah, I make a blue cheese bacon dip to serve with homemade roquefort crackers sometimes...it's just blue cheese, creme fraiche, bit of cayenne and red pepper, bacon (crisped and chopped up), and a bit of whatever herbs I have in the fridge. Very good!

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