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Bu Pun Su

French Culinary Terms

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How about cannelles? Does it have two syllables or three? I need to learn French just so I can pronounce all this stuff.

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Sometimes (and I mean once or twice a year, at max), I actually feel happy to be French. It makes the whole pronunciation matter a lot easier.

If you need any help with French words, I should be able to answer your questions.

Love xxx

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How about cannelles?  Does it have two syllables or three?  I need to learn French just so I can pronounce all this stuff.

Do you mean canelle as in cinnamon or canelés (small custrady pastries from Bordeaux)?

cannelle: ca-neh-le

canelé: ca-nəh-leh (ə being like euh)

And btw, the last syllabe of macaron= ron, is pronunced like r-on (ON as in ONtario not turn ON the music).

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And btw, the last syllabe of macaron= ron, is pronunced like r-on (ON as in ONtario not turn ON the music).

To this Canadian, "Ontario" and "on" have the same initial vowel sound... :huh:

I always have trouble with millefeuille. I know the "mille" part, but I get stuck on the "feuille" part. French pronunciation was never my strong point, and that's why I quit as soon as I was legally allowed!


Edited by prasantrin (log)

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And btw, the last syllabe of macaron= ron, is pronunced like r-on (ON as in ONtario not turn ON the music).

To this Canadian, "Ontario" and "on" have the same initial vowel sound... :huh:

I always have trouble with millefeuille. I know the "mille" part, but I get stuck on the "feuille" part. French pronunciation was never my strong point, and that's why I quit as soon as I was legally allowed!

Oh well, I asked my British boyfriend, and to him, on is more like onnnnnn (yep, I'm slightly exagerating) while the vowel sounds 'shorter' in ontario.


Edited by fanny_the_fairy (log)

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I'd have thought the opposite to your bf, fanny. If you listen carefully to "Ontario", the "n" is slightly elongated.

Think of it in musical terms. Hitting the Hi-hat closed, will give you the short "n" sound, opening it slightly will give you a subtle, slightly longer sound.

"On" by itself is faster, because it ends after the "n", the "n" in "Ontario" takes longer, because you're adjusting your throat and tounge for the "t".

:blink: All that for a bit of a word!


Edited by GTO (log)

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And how about millefeuille's pronounciation?

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Ironically, tonight I was told that a skoehn was actually a skahn.

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And how about millefeuille's pronounciation?

Meel-fuh-eye (say it quickly)

That's a pretty tough one for most english speakers to pronounce let alone spell phonetically...

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In Corsica, I tried to order a mille feuille from a Belgian waiter. I ended up looking him in the eye and saying, "I'll have a Napoleon."

It was torture until I got there.

How about non pareil? It's not pastry, but it's sweet.

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for non pareil:

'Nohn pah-ray' is the closest I can think of that, but it's a little like millefeuille in that the eil and euille have a slight 'ee' sound at the end (it's pretty faint though). I think the technical term is a diphthong--a combination of two vowel sounds to produce a new one. An example in english is 'loin' If you say 'loh-een' a little quicker and mush the vowels together you get the 'oi' sound. So non pareil is sort of like 'nohn pah-rayee' except you don't really pronounce the ee as much as just add the flavour of it at the end. I hope that helped out a bit, sorry if it didn't--this is hard to do in just text!

dragée or dragee is pronounced drag-ay

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dragée or dragee is pronounced drag-ay

It's a soft g, accent on the 2nd syllable (dra-ZHEY) :smile:

eskay, I would've thought the L of nonpareil was silent too, but the dictionary I looked at says non-puh-REL. Huh. No alternatives, either.


Edited by jumanggy (log)

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eskay, I would've thought the L of nonpareil was silent too, but the dictionary I looked at says non-puh-REL. Huh. No alternatives, either.

I know next to nothing about French, but a friend of mine who studied it said that if any of the letters in the word 'careful' are at the end of a word, you pronounce that letter. If you'll notice in words like millefeuille, the 'l' is not at the end of the word, so you don't pronounce it.

Then again, that could be complete bullshi*, I wouldn't know. Maybe my friend just wanted people to snicker at me. But that is what I was told.

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Gesztenyetorte  or Gesztenye torta

Hungarian chestnut cake

geh sten ye tor ta

in certain regions of Hungary  a bit of a y sound at the beginning

and alternate spelling,  gestenyepür torta  or

yeah sten ye pür tor ta

I learned this from my Hungarian housekeeper.

Thanks, andie...

And then there is the German version of this cake which may be a little easier to pronounce..

"Kastanientorte"

kah-stahn"-nyen-tort-eh


Edited by ludja (log)

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How about Dulce de Leche?

dool say day leh chay

Actually the pronunciation varies from country to country in Central and South America's Spanish-speaking countries as well as in Brazil.

Argentina claims the origin history of dulce de leche

but this is hotly contested by Mexico, Peru, Columbia, Uruguay, Cuba, Costa Rica and Brazil which calls it doce de leite. Not to mention Puerto Rico and Panama.

But it is also called dolce de latte in Patagonia

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Gesztenyetorte  or Gesztenye torta

Hungarian chestnut cake

geh sten ye tor ta

in certain regions of Hungary  a bit of a y sound at the beginning

and alternate spelling,  gestenyepür torta  or

yeah sten ye pür tor ta

I learned this from my Hungarian housekeeper.

Thanks, andie...

And then there is the German version of this cake which may be a little easier to pronounce..

"Kastanientorte"

kah-stahn"-nyen-tort-eh

Now if I could only figure out how the Polish version is spelled in the English alphabet as well as the pronunciation.

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This is probably the wrong place to post this, but:

I breezed past a FN episode of "Guys Big Bite" (yeah, Fieri). He made a dish they were calling "Moc-Shoe". I know that's not the correct spelling for the classic dish and am wracking my brain (and google) for the right term/recipe. Can anyone give me a clue?

Thanks.

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