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What is "g" pectin?


tammylc
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Hello to all and thank you for the kind words. I am very happy to see so many people talking about the book. It was a lot of work as well as fun to make. Clearly, I was expecting it to get torn apart, in a good way, and I am glad all of you are pointing out both things that you like and things that you are hesitant about. My apologies for the whole pectin issue. This is somthing that I have been working on for a couple of years and just got the good people at Chef Rubber to make for me. The "g" pectin is one that I formulated to make the chocolates in my book and it is the one I use in production. For all of you out there that use Vitpris, you may now switch to "g" pectin. I have used Vitpris for more that 13 years and the price has steadily risen to astronomical prices due to only one person getting it in the United States, as far as I know. If I told you the number of disasters I threw in the garbage creating this pectin, you would think I am nuts. Thank you Kerry for pointing out the citric acid, very smart. There is a citric acid milled into the "g" pectin for flavor and textural reasons. As the quantity of "g" pectin used in the recipe seems high to some of you, it is not straight pectin. It is a milled blend of a dextrose, acid and several types of pectin. I welcome questions and comments and I will try to answer all of them. Andrew Shotts

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Hello to all and thank you for the kind words. I am very happy to see so many people talking about the book. It was a lot of work as well as fun to make. Clearly, I was expecting it to get torn apart, in a good way, and I am glad all of you are pointing out both things that you like and things that you are hesitant about. My apologies for the whole pectin issue. This is somthing that I have been working on for a couple of years and just got the good people at Chef Rubber to make for me. The "g" pectin is one that I formulated to make the chocolates in my book and it is the one I use in production. For all of you out there that use Vitpris, you may now switch to "g" pectin. I have used Vitpris for more that 13 years and the price has steadily risen to astronomical prices due to only one person getting it in the United States, as far as I know. If I told you the number of disasters I threw in the garbage creating this pectin, you would think I am nuts. Thank you Kerry for pointing out the citric acid, very smart. There is a citric acid milled into the "g" pectin for flavor and textural reasons. As the quantity of "g" pectin used in the recipe seems high to some of you, it is not straight pectin. It is a milled blend of a dextrose, acid and several types of pectin. I welcome questions and comments and I will try to answer all of them. Andrew Shotts

Andrew, welcome! It's going to be wonderful to have you here.

First I must correct something from earlier in this thread, the balsamic ganache actually did set up, and I as able to cut it with the gel underneath quite easily. I never got around to posting that fact. It did have a strong vinegar flavour, but I must admit I wasn't using the best balsamic. I'm sure a better vinegar would have had a mellower effect. I had a chef suggest once taking one of those little net booties you squeeze lemons in and putting it over the neck of the vinegar bottle with the lid off and allow it to concentrate that way - no heat damage like boiling it down. I suspect vinegar concentrated that way would give me a better tasting ganache.

Vitpris as I understand it is apple pectin. I recall seeing only a couple of american sites that carry it, I've found a couple of Canadian sources but it's taken me a year or so. What is the cost of the 'g' pectin going to be (not that I need another pectin - having 4 kg in the house already)? Would we be out of line asking what sort of pectins are in the blend for those of us who are likely to blend our own?

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I'd like to offer a great big welcome to Bonbonman Andrew Shotts. I have long admired your chocolates and your style. I love your ganache and pate combinations and have been wanting to work more with pate but have found the prices of pectin prohibitive and the varieties confusing. I am excited to see what Chef Rubber will be offering on your behalf. I recieved your book early this week and will start playing soon.

By the way, I appreciate very much that although you make the finest bonbons, you are not afraid to make a simple and perfect caramel corn because that's what the people want. It's nice to know that someone with your experience is not pretentious!

Welcome to eG.

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First off, the pate de fruit should be on top when you cut the chocolate. As, for the "g" pectin I am sorry but I can not divulge the ingredients more than I already have. Thank you for the welcome. The price on the pectin should be available today.

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I even make Rice Krispy treats, with Fruit Loops folded in for color, dipped in chocolate.

Some of the simplist stuff is the most popular isn't it? Have you done anything with pop rocks?

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Hello and Welcome Andrew, egullet has always new surprise for us .

I have ordered your book last week and I am looking foward to see it.

For the experiments with pectine and jelly/pate de fruit, I did some red wine jelly yesterday , using the Pomona's and what finally came out wasnt too bad at all,actually more similar to the one that I remeber from l"artisan Du chocolat.

Well I will sure try the pectin g .The only thing I would like to see is a jelly or pate de fruit , with less sugar in it, I know is hard to do but I dont like the idea of making something with that much sugar , glucose and inverted sugar.

Vanessa

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The only thing I would like to see is a jelly or pate de fruit , with less sugar in it, I know is hard to do but I dont like the idea of making something with that much sugar , glucose and inverted sugar.

You should keep playing around with the Pomona's then, Vanessa, as its claim to fame is that it can work with very low sugar or artificially sweetened jellies, jams, etc.

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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Andrew, I've just ordered your book. For us humble european amateurs it is a pleasure to discover books that do the measurements in grammes - looking forward to seeing what surprises the book holds - oh, and welcome :smile:

Incidently, I had ignored this thread for a while as pectin is not readily available in Denmark, although I have been wanting to try making pate de fruit for a while

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I have to say that I have a lot of admiration for anyone passionate enough to do the "crazy" work it takes to create a better product. Drew, you obviously take a lot of pride in your work and it shows in your products. IMHO, to share g pectin with the rest of the world when you could keep it as your own secret ingredient is huge. It's a very cool thing. Thank you for joining us. I'm sooo looking forward to playing with these recipes.

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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I have the book too (first review on Amazon). My only complaint is the book says it g pectin is a pectin "that I developed", but it that isn't sold at garrison confections website. So there is no real way to know how to use it or substitute for the lay person who doesn't come on this site. I appreciate that Andrew has let us know how to order it.

I haven't tried the recipes, but the ideas have a nice range of classic to more modern flavors. There are some nice ideas and a nice table of appropriate spice/chocolate/flavor pairings.

I like the techniques sections the best. For $25 (list) you can learn all the techniques you need to be a chocolatier. In that way, I think it's a revolutionary book in the field.

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Well, since I don't (yet) have any g pectin, I've been continuing in my experiments with adapting the recipe to use Pomona's.

When last we left our pate de fruit maker, she had tried using 1 tbsp of pectin, and found that although the texture was no longer like fruit leather, it was still a little too firm.

So yesterday, I tried a batch with just 2 tsp, plus 1/8 tsp of citric acid for flavor. Much, much nicer texture - soft, but still held it's shape. But I'm worried that this leaves too much free moisture. I was just tossing these in sugar for serving on their own, but the sugar didn't stay dry and they got all sticky. While I love the texture and the flavor, I'm concerned that if I tried to dip them at this consistency, that I'd have trouble with my dipping chocolate seizing. Anyone have any sense of whether the "sugar test" would indeed be an indicator of that problem? Would leaving them to air dry for the recommended overnight after cutting address that concern anyway?

Anyway, this weekend I'll probably try a batch with 2.25 or 2.5 tsp, and actually finish them off, making another batch of ganache and doing the dipping too. The nice thing about pate de fruit is that it takes next to no time to make - as a very busy mom, I love that!

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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Well, since I don't (yet) have any g pectin, I've been continuing in my experiments with adapting the recipe to use Pomona's. 

When last we left our pate de fruit maker, she had tried using 1 tbsp of pectin, and found that although the texture was no longer like fruit leather, it was still a little too firm. 

So yesterday, I tried a batch with just 2 tsp, plus 1/8 tsp of citric acid for flavor.  Much, much nicer texture - soft, but still held it's shape.  But I'm worried that this leaves too much free moisture.  I was just tossing these in sugar for serving on their own, but the sugar didn't stay dry and they got all sticky.  While I love the texture and the flavor, I'm concerned that if I tried to dip them at this consistency, that I'd have trouble with my dipping chocolate seizing.  Anyone have any sense of whether the "sugar test" would indeed be an indicator of that problem?  Would leaving them to air dry for the recommended overnight after cutting address that concern anyway?

Anyway, this weekend I'll probably try a batch with 2.25 or 2.5 tsp, and actually finish them off, making another batch of ganache and doing the dipping too.  The nice thing about pate de fruit is that it takes next to no time to make - as a very busy mom, I love that!

I often leave pate de fruit to sit and dry before rolling in sugar if it is too moist.

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gallery_7436_3666_3984.jpg

Success!

5 oz strawberry puree (from 1 lb strawaberries and 1.5 oz confectioner's sugar)

4 1/4 oz sugar

2 1/4 tsp Pomona's Universal Pectin

1/8 tsp citric acid

Good flavor, good texture. Works well with the ganache. Dead easy to make, too. Thanks all for ideas and advice!

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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gallery_7436_3666_3984.jpg

Success!

5 oz strawberry puree (from 1 lb strawaberries and 1.5 oz confectioner's sugar)

4 1/4 oz sugar

2 1/4 tsp Pomona's Universal Pectin

1/8 tsp citric acid

Good flavor, good texture.  Works well with the ganache.  Dead easy to make, too.  Thanks all for ideas and advice!

Brava, Tammy!

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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gallery_7436_3666_3984.jpg

Success!

5 oz strawberry puree (from 1 lb strawaberries and 1.5 oz confectioner's sugar)

4 1/4 oz sugar

2 1/4 tsp Pomona's Universal Pectin

1/8 tsp citric acid

Good flavor, good texture.  Works well with the ganache.  Dead easy to make, too.  Thanks all for ideas and advice!

Those look terrific! Thank you for sharing the results of your experimentations! :smile:

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  • 2 months later...

I have tried, thrice now, to make a strawberry pate de fruit from Andrew Shotts' new book. The recipe:

5 oz. Strawberry puree (I made it according to the directions in his book as well)

4.5 oz (.5 cup) granulated sugar

2 Tbls. g pectin

Cook puree and half sugar until boiling. Add rest of sugar and the pectin (pre-mixed). Cook until boiling, then cook an additional 2 minutes. Pour into pan and allow to cool overnight.

I followed the recipe to a tee, and the fruit never set. I then tried again and came out with the same results. I tried a third time, this time adding 1 Tbls. Lemon Juice before the final 2 minutes of cooking. That time, I got closer to getting the fruit to set, but not quite.

I assume that my problem lies in the pectin. I have no idea what "g" pectin is, but I found it for sale online and it was very pricey. Any help on this issue or on a substitute for "g" pectin?

"It only hurts if it bites you" - Steve Irwin

"Whats another word for Thesaurus?" - Me

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I have tried, thrice now, to make a strawberry pate de fruit from Andrew Shotts' new book. The recipe:

5 oz. Strawberry puree (I made it according to the directions in his book as well)

4.5 oz (.5 cup) granulated sugar

2 Tbls. g pectin

Cook puree and half sugar until boiling. Add rest of sugar and the pectin (pre-mixed). Cook until boiling, then cook an additional 2 minutes. Pour into pan and allow to cool overnight.

I followed the recipe to a tee, and the fruit never set. I then tried again and came out with the same results. I tried a third time, this time adding 1 Tbls. Lemon Juice before the final 2 minutes of cooking. That time, I got closer to getting the fruit to set, but not quite.

I assume that my problem lies in the pectin. I have no idea what "g" pectin is, but I found it for sale online and it was very pricey. Any help on this issue or on a substitute for "g" pectin?

g pectin is a formulation that Andrew created himself and the source as you have discovered is Chef Rubber. It is a combination of some sort of pectin/or pectins and some citric acid. Here is a link to the thread about Andrew's book and you can see the substitutes that some of us have tried. Apparently you should boil for 3 minutes rather than the 2 minutes the book describes.

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yes i also had this experience. most frustrating. in fact we ended up cooking the gelees far longer than we should have, freezing them because they wouldn't properly set and enduring the final indignity from my niece: "tastes like frozen jam"

i'm back to crumbles and smoothies

Life! what's life!? Just natures way of keeping meat fresh - Dr. who

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Just use a different recipe. Below is a recipe that I have used many times and it works well. The trick is to get your puree at the right consistency (basically something slightly thicker than water). Im a pastry chef and I usually buy my purees from a suplier, but I were to make a strawberry puree I would destem a bunch of strawberries, puree them plain (no sugar), and reduce them by 25%.

900g Puree

23g Pectin

90g Sugar

900g Sugar

180g Glucose

14g Tartaric Acid

Combine pectin and first sugar in a bowl and mix throughly.

Simmer puree.

Whisking constantly, add pectin and sugar mixture.

Add second amount of sugar.

Once boiling, add glucose, and continue to cook until mixture reaches 225 F.

Remove from heat and whisk in acid.

Pour into mold and let set.

Unmold and coat in granulated sugar.

The pectin in this recipe is just basic powdered pectin. I didnt have tartaric acid so I used lemon juice.

Rhubarb is in season now, try pureeing that and making pate a fruits out of that.

Best of luck to you!

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...

Remove from heat and whisk in acid.

Pour into mold and let set.

...

Adding the lemon juice (or citric / tartaric acid) right at the end is really important, and could be the difference between success and failure.
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  • 9 months later...

I have a question about the pate de fruit recipes in Andrew's book. I noticed that every recipe is exactly the same except for the type of puree used. Same amounts of puree, sugar and G-pectin for every fruit. Does that mean I can use those ratios with any fruit puree subbed in for the ones in the book? Are there some fruits that don't work well for pate de fruit? Right now I have strawberry, raspberry, morello cherry, passion fruit and a couple types of apple purees on hand.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I have a question about the pate de fruit recipes in Andrew's book. I noticed that every recipe is exactly the same except for the type of puree used. Same amounts of puree, sugar and G-pectin for every fruit. Does that mean I can use those ratios with any fruit puree subbed in for the ones in the book? Are there some fruits that don't work well for pate de fruit? Right now I have strawberry, raspberry, morello cherry, passion fruit and a couple types of apple purees on hand.

I don't have Andrew's book and do not have experience with the g-pectin; however, for the Boiron purees and recipes, the amount of pectin varies with the type of fruit and some fruits require the addition of other basis purees e.g. passionfruit requires the addition of apricot.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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