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Cooking for 50 Senior Citizens


CaliPoutine
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The dinner went over very well. The most popular items were the jello, the butternut squash and the stuffing.

I forgot the celery/onions that I cut up yesterday so I started the stuffing in the crockpot and added the cooked veggies at 4pm when the coordinator brought them. They were still a tad crunchy!!

Everyone was intrigued by the Panko( thanks Christine) on top. I had more than a few questions about what it was.

I told Kathy( coordinator) that I should cook Thanksgiving every week. We served buffet style and it was so easy.

Pics to come later.

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And inquiring minds want to know...

Did anyone actually say, "Thank you!"?

I'm glad your TG dinner was a success!  And I kind of like crunchy celery in stuffing.

Nope, no "Thank You". But, at least I got " that was very good". I did hear two old bittys discussing the green bean bake. Not sure what they were talking about, but I dont think it was good. These two are known complainers.

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I stopped on my way in to pick up some eggs. I thought this was kinda funny(but sad too).

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When I got to the church, the tables were set up in long rows. I thought it was nice, but I knew the seniors would be in a tither. As each one came in the doors, they commented about where they were going to sit.

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I could have used another turkey roast. I wasnt very generous when I served it and I only made 1 TV dinner. Next time I'll order a small roast in addition to the 2 8lb roasts I cooked.

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I made 2 bags of cranberries and bought these plastic shot glasses. I love doing it buffet style, its so much easier.

They loved the jello too. I'd printed off a few copies of the recipe that I ended up handing out. We plated up the jello and served it before they got up for the buffet. A few people thought it might be dessert and I said " No, its your salad, its from the Crediton Church Cookbook( I thought that might give me more credibility).

No pics of the store-bought pumpkin pie.

eta: One man did ask " where is the turnip". I swear to God, I can't win!!

Edited by CaliPoutine (log)
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Just got this email:

I was just telling Marg what a good response we had to your meal and the whole evening. I was still receiving compliments as they left. So give yourself a pat on the back. We know that compliments are few and far between with these people. I did ask for a response about prime rib and the majority did vote in favour of having it for Christmas. If you see a special, give me a call before you buy. I am checking on someone I know who might help. We probably should try to be a little economical with this next meal as Thanksgiving was a little pricey.

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I've never cooked a Prime Rib, so how would I do it?

Should I do it the day before?

I think you should do it the day of, BUT...

Didn't they once complain about beef that wasn't cooked enough? Or was it beef they thought was overcooked?

I think you should also have the co-ordinator poll the guests on how they like their beef done. If the majority like it well-done, then you could cook it to medium the day before, slice it, and heat the day-of till it's a nice well-done. If they want their prime rib cooked to well-done, then I think that should be good enough for them.

But if the majority actually have some taste buds, as opposed to complaint buds, then cook it the day-of.

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I believe they thought it was overcooked because they couldnt cut it with a butter knife. It was a cheap cut of meat so that was probably the issue. I cooked it to 135F and let it rest. There is a pic of it back in January 08.

I wish I wouldnt have suggested it. I'm pretty good at making turkey dinners!!

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I've never cooked a Prime Rib, so how would I do it?

Should I do it the day before?

Oh god no, please don't! :smile:

I'm assuming you're saying dont do it the day before.

How should I cook it?

You're right, that's what I'm saying. :smile: The suggestion of getting a read on how they like their meat done is a good one. That will guide much of what you do with this. If you can keep an eye open for a good deal on a Prime Rib at Costco, you'll have a really nice cut of meat. I'm a big fan of Costco Prime Ribs.

Anyway, you want to roast this in a 325 oven. Lightly brushed with olive oil and dusted with salt and pepper. Timing will depend on how they like it done.

I'm guessing no one will want rare, so that's out.

Med rare, 25 minutes per lb.

med well, 28 minutes per lb

well done. 30-32 minutes per pound. you want to get a big one I think, or you're going to have a problem with oven space cooking more than one at a time. I forget if you have more than one oven there. You can throw potatoes around the roast and let them roast with the meat. The potatoes will take about 2 hours, so if your roast needs more than two hours and it likely will, throw the potatoes on when you've got two hours to go. Deglaze the pan, use a roux and some stock and make gravy.

Email me if you need help the day of to help walk you through it.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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One thing I would be very wary about is Prime Rib on special! Dominion had some last week for $4.99/lb. I checked out the roasts and they are Grade AA and so lacking in any fat marbling that no matter how you cooked them they would be lacking in flavour. It is always worth checking out, however, because occasionally you will find a Grade AAA among them but not often.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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One thing I would be very wary about is Prime Rib on special!  Dominion had some last week for $4.99/lb.  I checked out the roasts and they are Grade AA and so lacking in any fat marbling that no matter how you cooked them they would be lacking in flavour.  It is always worth checking out, however, because occasionally you will find a Grade AAA among them but not often.

Since I dont buy beef, how would I know whether it was AA or AAA. Would they be labeled as such? Foodland has them on sale and they say the regular price is 11.99lb.

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One thing I would be very wary about is Prime Rib on special!  Dominion had some last week for $4.99/lb.  I checked out the roasts and they are Grade AA and so lacking in any fat marbling that no matter how you cooked them they would be lacking in flavour.  It is always worth checking out, however, because occasionally you will find a Grade AAA among them but not often.

Since I dont buy beef, how would I know whether it was AA or AAA. Would they be labeled as such? Foodland has them on sale and they say the regular price is 11.99lb.

The grade is almost always displayed on the packaging. Check this for more information on recognizing the grades of beef in Canada according to the amount of marbling present.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Randi, you should really try to hook up with someone in a restaurant that's willing to let you piggyback on their orders now and then. Rib is at a decent price right now (at least through my guy), I picked up some 8 kg+ boneless (yeah, I know... but it works out better for the purpose these were purchased for), cap-off at ~$5.75 lb. this week. Boneless, cap-off is cook, cut and eat. Waste is pretty much zero. The price will definitely go up as the holiday season kicks in so I'd buy early if you decide to do it.

Cooking it low and slow will result in less drastic shrinkage and they will be able to cut it with a butter knife... even if they want it well done (or the program requires it for health code reasons). If well done is required you can salt 'em, sear 'em off in the afternoon, seal them in a big roasting pan with foil (and a little hot water or beef stock), throw 'em in the oven at around 175 - 200 f. and let 'em go until the next day. Check 'em for 150 f. or so, pull, rest and slice. Put the slices in a big pan and pour the hot gravy over. Seal and hold warm until needed. I don't like cooking it that done but I do what the customer asks for so sometimes I have to. They'll still be tender and you have a nice base for gravy. If you don't require well done or want to offer choices then obviously this won't work but, if you do need well done, they turn out surprisingly nice this way with very little last minute work.

Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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would the same method work for inside round? I had 25 lbs (3 pieces), which I ended up cutting into cubes and braising. But a roast would have been a nice change on the community meal menu. I am totally paranoid about cooking large pieces of meat...

Karen Dar Woon

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It works for any roast. If you have an oven that will go lower and lots of time, even better. The reason I said the above method is only good for well done is that holding it in hot gravy (at food safe temps) is going to eventually get it there no matter how it goes in the pan (unless you time it to be cut just before serving, in which case there's really no point to doing it at all). The method is actually better for cheaper/tougher cuts but sometimes people insist on prime rib despite the fact that they're going to make you torture it to well done. For prime rib not cooked to death, low and slow is still the way to go... just omit the adding liquid and sealing with foil parts. Personally, I like to low and very slow prime rib to very rare, rest it, cut it in thick slabs and finish them to order on a very hot grill. Nice steaks.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Thanks for the advice.

I was watching the new Cook's Country tv show( by the ppl from Cook's Illustrated)yesterday. The show was on Sunday roast!!

They cooked a sirlon tip roast( on sale now for 2.99lb). The used tons of garlic( slivers in the meat, garlic seasoning and then a garlic paste). I know the seniors wouldnt go for that much garlic, but the method looked nice.

Anyone see that show?

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Thanks for the advice.

I was watching the new Cook's Country tv show( by the ppl from Cook's Illustrated)yesterday.  The show was on Sunday roast!!

They cooked a sirlon tip roast( on sale now for 2.99lb).  The used tons of garlic( slivers in the meat, garlic seasoning and then a garlic paste).  I know the seniors wouldnt go for that much garlic, but the method looked nice.

Anyone see that show?

Yes, I watched it and was appalled by the amount of garlic used and I'm a garlic lover! Other than that I thought the process was reasonable and if it was up to me, I would much rather go for the cheaper roast than cook a prime rib past medium rare. (Extremely rare for my gang but I understand that seniors have different tastes.)

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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