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Cooking for 50 Senior Citizens


CaliPoutine
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But where IS the tuna?  :huh:

So, I figured out that I probably returned the tuna to the food bank. And now that a few weeks have passed, the food bank people are back to being really helpful, and offering food to our program again :-) Except that there aren't any large cans of anything there right now...

This week I had everything planned out. Cheeseburger Pasta Bake (mac & cheese w/ browned ground beef added; plus the tomato pesto I made a couple of weeks ago). Mediterranean Bean Salad, Tossed Salad w/ Herb Vinagrette. Grapes were $25 for an 18 lb case, and gala apples were $31 for 100. It all sounded so good. Except that we had an INCH OF WATER on the floor at 2:30 (dinner is at 5:30). So, while one of the volunteers and I mopped the floor, the others started chopping the items we had already washed. We collectively decided NOT to use the sink any more, as the floor drain was backing up. Sigh. No pasta cooking. No lettuce washing. Sent the salad greens to someone's home to wash. Put the pasta away. Ordered pizza. For 100. 15 pizzas $150 + tax.

And we continued on making the salads. I love that we make all our own dressings here. Everything tastes fresh. We get to experiment (just a little). Since the Sharing Farm had given us LOTS of carrots, I added a carrot slaw to the menu.

Everything turned out ok. Turns out the grease trap in the kitchen needs to be cleaned more often. A clog had developed in the major pipes, which caused the backup. A plumber was on-site in 45 minutes, mostly because his client told him to "go right away, those church people need you more than me". We used paper plates, for the first time ever, to ease the load on the dishwasher and drain. Only a few people complained about paper plates. We set out only a fork and spoon, and no one complained about no knives.

I finally remembered to take my camera today. Of all days. So, here are two of the salads. By the time I remembered to actually shoot anything, the carrot slaw was looking pretty "tired".

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Now I need to go back to work tomorrow to wrap and freeze the 20 lbs of hamburger I bought :wacko:

but at least the drain will work next week.

Edited by KarenDW (log)

Karen Dar Woon

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Happy Canadian Thanksgiving( its actually on Oct 8th)

This was the closest meal to Thanksgiving so the seniors get a turkey dinner. Cost of this meal is 10.00 instead of 8.00 and as of Oct 1st will increase to 12.00. Special meals( thanksgiving and xmas) higher. I've also been informed that the regular meals are going up to 9.00( more on this later)

This meal was very well received. I should be happy about this, but I'm not. This meal was the most processed food meal I've probably ever made. Our blue box( recyle) was filled to the brim with cans and boxes which doesnt make me happy. Anyway, I had to be ultra aware of what I spent because we chose to buy turkey roasts( white and dark) as opposed to whole turkeys. They were much easier to cook, but they cost 3.70lb. I believe I got about 20lbs. I also made a carrot/raisin salad( I bought pre-shredded carrots on sale). I also made the infamous green bean casserole( its not a big thing here like in the US). I made some doctored up stuffing( Uncle Ben's stuff and such). I added sauteed onion and celery and another bag of plain bread cubes. Budget constraints forced me to buy "white potatoes" which I hate. I prefer russets for mashing but I would have had to buy 4 Five pound bags @2.99 each. I spent 4.50 on the white spuds. I truly doubt anyone but me knew the difference.

I cooked the turkeys on Wednesday. I also made a cranberry jello salad( from a Taste of Home Magazine Eg member Marmish sent me). The salad didnt gel so I ended up straining out the fruit and mixing it with canned cranberry sauce.

The bread was from Eg member Tino. He came up last weekend to help me with a wedding I catered and he graciously made his infamous honey whole wheat bread for the canapes. I used the leftovers for the seniors.

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Dessert was pumpkin pie from M&M Meat shop. I'm not sure how to describe M &M except to say that people in this area go crazy for their stuff. I dont know why? It's a shop that sells pre-packaged frozen food in large portions. Here is a link to the store.. Anyway, they had 8inch pumpkin pies on sale for 2.50 each. I couldnt even make a pie for that price. Canned pumpkin is around 2.50 a can here and then I'd have to buy evap milk( 1.55), eggs, pie crust, etc. I did serve the pie w/ real whipped cream.

I was told by the coordinator that myself and the other cook are over budget. I totally dispute that. I often buy meat, etc for future meals and I dont believe the main office takes that into consideration. Additionally, when I'm told to cook for 50 ppl and only 35 show up, of course I'm over budget. I plan on calling the main office today to discuss this with them.

Next meal

Oct 11th( Chicken ala king using chicken breasts I bought back in June)

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Another fine meal, Cali, considering what you have to work with.

It is too bad there are cost pressures on you, as the bean counters are never going to thank you, but will regret if you leave :sad:

I have noticed that the more upscale marts like Sobey's and Costco often sell off their fresh turkeys at $1/lb after the big day (Thanksgiving, Xmas, Easter). I buy a small bird, cut it up, and freeze it. Maybe you could get several if they are available, and save for a future meal.

It is good that the meal prices are adjusted, but will the seniors come in the same numbers, or grumble??

:hmmm:

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This meal was very well received.  I should be happy about this, but I'm not.  This meal was the most processed food meal I've probably ever made. 

Yikes! Well, at least it gives you a very clear idea of the type of food they really like...

:unsure:

The bread was from Eg member Tino.  He came up last weekend to help me with a wedding I catered and he graciously made his infamous honey whole wheat bread for the canapes.  I used the leftovers for the seniors. 

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Wowsers! That's some fine looking whole wheat! Why is it infamous? Because it's so good, it's bad? :wink: Would you or Tino care to share the recipe?

I was told by the coordinator that myself and the other cook are over budget.  I totally dispute that.  I often buy meat, etc for future meals and I dont believe the main office takes that into consideration.  Additionally, when I'm told to cook for 50 ppl and only 35 show up, of course I'm over budget.  I plan on calling the main office today to discuss this with them. 

Next meal

Oct 11th( Chicken ala king using chicken breasts I bought back in June)

So will the cost of those June chicken breasts count as part of the October 11 meal, or does it count as part of your June costs?

Does the coordinator average out the costs of all your meals, or does s/he only look at the per meal cost (or per month cost of meals)?

I hope you can show them the light regarding your food costs. If they don't know your background in law, they're going to be in big trouble! My money is on you for this one!

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I was told by the coordinator that myself and the other cook are over budget.  I totally dispute that.  I often buy meat, etc for future meals and I dont believe the main office takes that into consideration.  Additionally, when I'm told to cook for 50 ppl and only 35 show up, of course I'm over budget.  I plan on calling the main office today to discuss this with them. 

Next meal

Oct 11th( Chicken ala king using chicken breasts I bought back in June)

Hi Randi.

Do you keep copies of the food/supplies receipts that you submit for reimbursement? I actually started keeping spreadsheets for each menu, that I keep for my personal records. Also, I submit a monthly summary of expenses, including both the cash expenses (which I paid out) and credit billings (which suppliers will invoice the agency directly). Must admit, it really makes a difference to be here, near Vancouver, where there are lots of delivery possibilities. Even the Costco and Warehouse Club are only 40 min away by car. Our group is larger (average 100) and so our per-guest cost is lower.

You are doing such great work. Keep it up, but only if you still *want* it.

Karen Dar Woon

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For some reason, I'm not getting emails that people have responded to my topic!!

Anyway, I'm now starting to keep a sheet with all the costs per meal. Prior to this last meal, I just turned in my receipts. I have charging privleges at 3 grocery stores. Your Independant( part of Loblaw's), Foodland and No Frills. I tend to buy most of my groceries at No Frills except for the meat because No Frills is the cheapest. I've made friends with the butcher at Hansens( Independent) and now when I go shopping( even for myself), he'll run up to me to tell me whats on sale and what is going on sale. About a month ago, I picked up boneless, skinless thighs for .99lb. Those went into their freezer too.

Rona,

I'm not sure about your question. I assume it goes on the month where I cook it, but I'm probably wrong if they think my food costs are too high. I know they arent so I'll be explaining this to the main office.

I really need to get a giant braising pot. My ex catering boss has one I could borrow, but I dont really like asking. I think I'm going to write a letter to the restaurant supply in London and see if they can donate one. Whenever I make a stew, I end up dragging all my Le Crueset down to the church and then I get confused when I have to divide up the recipe into the various pots.

Re: The bread. Tom( Tino) has made that bread for the last 2 Heartland Gatherings and we all love it so much. I'll email him and see if he will chime in.

Edited by CaliPoutine (log)
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I really need to get a giant braising pot.  My ex catering boss has one I could borrow, but I dont really like asking.  I think I'm going to write a letter to the restaurant supply in London and see if they can donate one.

or, you could use the hotel pans, if you have some. Or the roasting pans which are sometimes available at Costco... there's one in London, right? Mostly, I do oven braises, because it's less lifting, overall.

Karen Dar Woon

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thursday's meal

Greek Salad

Chicken, Lemon, Broccoli casserole

Jasmine rice

Pillsbury Grands biscuits

Tomato soup spice cake w/ cinnamon buttercream icing

An Eg member gave me this casserole recipe. The original recipe( or maybe I should say her modification) called for arthichokes. She told me I could use broccoli which I did. Her directions( I'll let her speak up and name herself if she so desires) called for layering the casserole, but I just mixed everything up and chucked it in the pan. I baked 25 bone-in breasts the day before and used the meat for the casseroles. I made a quick stock with the bones which I use next week for scalloped potatoes. I had way too many breasts so I probably ended up using about 18 of them. The rest of the ingredients are canned soup( yeah, yeah, I know), mayo, lemon zest and peel, broccoli( I used 7 bags of frozen chopped) and shredded sharp cheedar. I also threw in some chopped parsely and black pepper. The top is sprinkled with whole wheat saltines that are browned off in some butter.

I bought Jasmine rice to serve it over. I can't get it across to these folks that the casserole goes on top of the rice. They think the rice is their side dish and then complain because the rice has no flavor. I wanted to serve brown rice, but I didnt think that would go over too well.

The salad was just basic romaine,red onion, cukes, tomatoes, green pepper, feta and black olives.

I bought pillsbury grands homestyle biscuits( I've never seen them in the stores here) in Michigan last week and I'm telling you, god only knows why, but the Seniors LOVED THEM!!! I actually think they thought that I made them. LOL

Dessert was a doctored up spice cake mix( tomato soup, raisins, pecans( which I left out) w/ a cinnamon buttercream frosting.

I cooked for 50ppl and only 32 showed with 9 take-outs. I'll come back with the total amount I spent later on!!

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salad

casserole uncooked

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cooked

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cake

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Edited by CaliPoutine (log)
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Cali, I have read your thread with fascination. I am amazed at how well you handle this challenge. I can appreciate how difficult what you do actually is. By the time I was 18 I was a head chef for a not for profit Bible Camp that made everything from scratch and we too were on a strick budget. We served on average 230 people three meals a day camp sessions that went for two weeks. They were mostly kids which is remarkably similar to cooking for seniors. Just because they can tolerate spicey and interesting foods, it doesn't mean they are willing to eat any of it. We baked all our own breads, rolls, and desserts which was a real cost cutter. We didn't use mixes for anything.

I still remember the most helpful cookbook we had. It was called "Food for 50". It was a very straightfoward book that covered everything from roasting meats to making sauces to baking breads, coffee cakes and desserts. It had terrific ideas and great charts that multiplied out each recipe. I don't know if it is still in print but it would be worth a google.

Cindy

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Oh I'm quite proud that you used my recipe that I got from V. Wingfield many many moons ago. For the little time that I had the tea-room open, I had repeat customers coming in for that stuff. I served it like a grand eloquent open face sandwich bursting out all over the pate choux 'bun' with the little pate choux lid sliding off to the side. It's wonderful good. The last time I made it for a Christmas potluck thing I had to email the recipe out to several people who requested it. Now I usually add the reduced chicken stock to this. You really can't screw it up.

Yay!!! Cool!

:biggrin:

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I also read this topic with awe and eagerly wait for the next installment. Calipoutine, you are doing an amazing job.

K8Memphis, any chance you could post the casserole recipe?

Edited by achevres (log)
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Thursday's meal( Oct 25th) is Ham and scalloped potatoes. I've already done this meal at Easter and its very popular. I'll be making a waldorf salad, corn muffins and an unknown dessert.

I'll post this meal on Friday.

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I also read this topic with awe and eagerly wait for the next installment.  Calipoutine, you are doing an amazing job.

K8Memphis, any chance you could post the casserole recipe?

Well for sure.

Hey, here is a kick ass recipe that even in the short tragic little life of my tea-room I had repeat customers coming in for it. It's awesomely delicious. All secrets included. :)

Creamy Chicken Artichoke Casserole

from a recipe given to me by Vickie Wingfield

2 cups cooked chicken ( I use a whole chicken)

2 cans cream of chicken soup (the kind with the herbs is great for this)

1 cup mayonaise (not miracle whip)

2 tablespoons lemon juice (I use juice & zest of one lemon)

1# grated cheese like cheddar or colby

2 cans artichokes -- not pickled (could use 16 oz frozen broccoli instead)

one quarter of a box of saltine crackers (I use two sleeves of Kroger brand wheat saltines)

9x13 pan (I use my lasagna pan)

(stock from cooking chicken--optional)

350 degrees for 30 -45 mins till nice & bubbly

Place chicken in bottom of dish cut or pulled into bite size pieces

(If you have reduced the chicken stock dab it over the chicken here & there evenly at this point)

Then layer the artichokes on top. (half or quarter artichokes if you want)

In a separate bowl, combine the soups, mayo, lemon & cheese and spread that over the artichokes & smooth with a spatula

Then crush a sleeve of saltine crackers into crumbs right in the wrapper.

Pour them into a skillet containing two tablespoons of butter -- heat, stirring constantly until they brown a bit.

You could even stop here & bake the next day or two. Be sure you keep the chicken properly--don't let it sit out too long. Keep it hot or keep it refrigerated.

Sprinkle fried cracker crumbs over the stuff & bake 350 degrees like 30-45 mins until nice & bubbly around the edges.

The day before assembly or that morning, I toss my whole chicken and a coupla cups of water in a crock pot with onions, salt & pepper, at a minimum. If I have it I also add, roughly chopped celery, carrots, lemon, 5-6 whole cloves and a bay leaf.I just cook the stuffins out of the chicken until it falls off the bone. When you pick up a leg it just comes off.

So remove the chicken from the stock let it cool some. Set a strainer into a container and pour the stock in and reserve the stock. Discard the vegetables caught in the strainer. You can put everything in the frige if you want at this point for assembly tomorrow.

Take the stock and remove the yellow fat that just sits on top of the cold stock. Put the stock in a pot and cook it down until it reduces to about 12 ounces or so ( like a cup to a cup & a half-ish) That's how I do my chicken. But you can use any kind of chicken. But that's how I do mine.

This can be served over rice, jasmine rice made with chicken broth is amazing with this. Umm, I usually serve this over pate choux or puff pastry. Or serve just as is. : )

You could leave your chicken in serving size pieces too if you want for ease of serving.

I'm sounding like Suzy Homemaker but honestly, my husband does the cooking here! haha

Take Care,

L&P,

Kate

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I still remember the most helpful cookbook we had.  It was called "Food for 50".  It was a very straightfoward book that covered everything from roasting meats to making sauces to baking breads, coffee cakes and desserts.  It had terrific ideas and great charts that multiplied out each recipe.  I don't know if it is still in print but it would be worth a google.

Cindy

I will second the nod for the "Food for 50" book. It is really quite a handy reference. I am also cooking for between 25-50 every Sunday for a non-profit community group, and I have found this book to be extremely helpful. The retail price is something like $60, but I got a used copy from Amazon for around $12. It does not have a lot of fancy or gourmet recipes, but it is perfect for these types of functions (serving large quantities of food to people with conservative palates, on a very tight budget). It also has helpful sections regarding menu planning, portions, cost control, etc.

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I still remember the most helpful cookbook we had.  It was called "Food for 50".  It was a very straightfoward book that covered everything from roasting meats to making sauces to baking breads, coffee cakes and desserts.  It had terrific ideas and great charts that multiplied out each recipe.  I don't know if it is still in print but it would be worth a google.

Cindy

I will second the nod for the "Food for 50" book. It is really quite a handy reference. I am also cooking for between 25-50 every Sunday for a non-profit community group, and I have found this book to be extremely helpful. The retail price is something like $60, but I got a used copy from Amazon for around $12. It does not have a lot of fancy or gourmet recipes, but it is perfect for these types of functions (serving large quantities of food to people with conservative palates, on a very tight budget). It also has helpful sections regarding menu planning, portions, cost control, etc.

I went searching for this book and found it on amazon for 70 bucks. I found a used copy for 10 so with shipping I got it for 14. Thanks!!

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Yesterday's meal was Ham, scalloped potatoes, waldorf salad, corn muffins, fresh brocoli and rice pudding.

Here is the rice pudding.

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I spent a total of 106.94. 41 ppl showed up and I had 7 take-outs(6.00) and I sold 8 packages of ham only for 2.00 each. I only spent 27.44 on the ham. It was 1.49lb which is really cheap. I did spend 14.00 on russet potatoes. I could have bought new potatoes cheaper, but I prefer russets for baking, mashing and scalloped. Each 5lb bag was 3.49. I used a lot of dairy for this meal 2L of half and half( 2.99 each). 1L of heavy cream and 12L of 2% for 4.00 each( on sale).

I also bought 500grams of cheddar for 4.99.

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Heres the waldorf salad. I used 9lbs of apples, 1 bunch of celery, half a bag of raisins and walnuts( toasted) and some mayo mixed with vanilla yogurt. I used some lemon juice from the pantry too.

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I made broccoli in the microwave using zip-n-steam bags. I love those bags, so easy. I'm bummed though that they arent recycleable.

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Edited by CaliPoutine (log)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Here is yesterday's meal.

I made a salad with spring mix, sauteed pears, toasted walnuts, grapes and goat cheese.

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The meat was an inside round oven roast. I sprinkled it with salt and pepper and dried thyme. I made gravy with the drippings and some "bisto". I had lots of complaints about the meat. The seniors couldnt cut it with their butter knife so they came to the conclusion that it was overcooked. It wasnt. I pulled it at 155F. It was nicely pink. I bought 7 roasts for a total of 43.15(1.79lb). I served 42 with 4 takeouts. I had 3 whole roasts left over. I froze them and I'm going to make a soup with them in January.

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I made oreo cheesecakes using a 9 x 13 pan. I got a great deal on Cream cheese over the weekend( 2 day special) for .99 each. Cream cheese is normally over 3 dollars a bar.

I made 7 lbs steamed asparagus( there wasnt 1 spear left). I also roasted some new potatoes.

Edited by CaliPoutine (log)
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I had lots of complaints about the meat.  The seniors couldnt cut it with their butter knife so they came to the conclusion that it was overcooked.  It wasnt.  I pulled it at 155F. It was nicely pink.

My first thought after seeing your photo was, "Well, the seniors must have loved that!" Thus, your comment took me by surprise. It must be challenging to cope with this group - it seems as though they find something to complain about, no matter what you do. One would think that they would discern the amount of effort that you devote to preparing the meals, and be more grateful or at least gracious. I think you're doing a great job under these difficult circumstances and my hat's off to you. The salad looked especially good!

I'm also impressed with how you are able to provide these meals so economically. In my non-profit meal venture (25-35 conservative palates, mostly teens, every Sunday), I have been given a budget of $2 pp. I've taken a cue from you: I wait to see what's on sale and then plan the meal around the sale items. A few times, I did go over budget, but since I'm a volunteer, they can't complain too much. :raz:

I'm very interested in your menus and I plan to try the broccoli-chicken casserole for my group, very soon. Like you, I have found that any "ethnic" tendencies in the menu do not go over well with the group. :sad: When I served Arroz con Pollo, which was delicious, I was left with a huge quantity of leftovers! Ditto chili. OTH, they ate every morsel of the 13 lb. fresh ham, lots of chicken, etc.

Here is a list of the last few menus - all under $2/pp (although not included is the cost of incidentals that I use from my own kitchen, such as salt and pepper, a bit of oil, a pinch of spice, a couple of eggs, etc.):

Vegetable Fried Rice (surprisingly, this went over quite well)

Chicken Kabobs (w/peanut sauce)

Pumpkin Cake with cc frosting

snack - 7 layer bars

Caesar salad

Fresh Ham - baked

Homemade Macaroni and Cheese

Cornbread muffins

cookies - purchased

Arroz con pollo

Garden salad

Dinner rolls - purchased

Brownies

Vegetarian chili

"American tacos" (flour tortillas w/ground turkey, lettuce, tomatoes, cheese, salsa, sour cream, etc.)

Grapes

Oatmeal cookies

Spaghetti and meatballs

Garden salad

Garlic bread

Klondike bars

Mesquite-seasoned chicken breast quarters

BBQ style baked beans

broccoli, cauliflower and carrots, steamed

Cornbread muffins

Cookies - donated

Roasted pork loin

Green Beans

Baked Apples

Wheat rolls

Rice pilaf

Ice cream bars

And last week's meal was very popular - the theme was "Breakfast for Dinner" and the kids, especially, loved it:

Waffles

Broccoli-cheese Strata

Sausage w/maple glaze and bacon strips

Watermelon chunks

Mini donuts, assorted

P.S. Randi, did your "Food for 50" book ever arrive?

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Thanks Karen!! I really thought they would love it too. I was almost in tears when I heard the complaints. I'm not used to ppl complaining about my food.

I run myself ragged going to different stores trying to find the sales. Last week a 20lb bag of potatoes was on sale for 3$ so I bought that and stored it at home until this week. I went to 2 stores yesterday( one for the salad mix) and another for the aspargus( 1.99lb) so I could serve a fresh veg.

I think they look at it like they're paying 9$ for the meal and maybe they think 9.00 is a lot of money. I don't know though. Its very frustrating.

The pears were on sale for .69lb and the grapes were .79lb. I'd still like to make lasagna and ceasar salad and garlic bread for a meal, but I think I'd get even more complaints. I just might do it next time though. My next meal is on Nov 22nd and its American Thanksgiving. I usually make dinner and have Canadian friends/family over but I can't this year because I have to cook for the Seniors. I'm not looking forward to sharing my holiday with people who can't appreciate my effort.

Oh and yes, I did get the book but I havent had a chance to look thru it yet. I wasnt aware that its a classroom textbook. I hope I bought the right book.

Edited by CaliPoutine (log)
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Thanks Karen!!  I really thought they would love it too.  I was almost in tears when I heard the complaints.  I'm not used to ppl complaining about my food. 

Nor should you be!! Like you, I was getting very frustrated with some of the diner's comments (e.g., re: Arroz con Pollo -- "What's thaaat?" as they are picking at the dish on the buffet line). So I decided not to wear myself out anymore. If they want plain and simple, I'll give it to them. Sad, but I figure that it's not my role to change these folks' eating habits. You are in probably a worse situation, since the clients are older and likely more set in the ways than the younger group that I feed (I think that most of mine are just picky and will grow out of it at some point).

I run myself ragged going to different stores trying to find the sales.  Last week a 20lb bag of potatoes was on sale for 3$ so I bought that and stored it at home until this week.    I went to 2 stores yesterday( one for the salad mix) and another for the aspargus( 1.99lb) so I could serve a fresh veg.

I hear you loud and clear - it's a frustration to put in all that extra effort when it does not appear to be appreciated. At least they liked the asparagus. :biggrin:

I'd still like to make lasagna and ceasar salad and garlic bread for a meal, but I think I'd get even more complaints.  I just might do it next time though.  My next meal is on Nov 22nd and its American Thanksgiving.  I usually make dinner and have Canadian friends/family over but I can't this year because I have to cook for the Seniors.  I'm not looking forward to sharing my holiday with people who can't appreciate my effort.

Er, my opinion is that you should do something very simple in order to have time to enjoy a pseudo-Thanksgiving meal with Robin, at least. (Would the "Breakfast for Dinner" theme work with them, or would they freak? That is not only inexpensive but quick and easy; it was also extremely popular. Perhaps you could do an "overnight french toast" and breakfast strata - both easily prepared ahead of time and then just cooked off right before service). It's just not right that you should have to forego proper enjoyment of the most important of food holidays - Thanksgiving!

Oh and yes, I did get the book but I havent had a chance to look thru it yet.  I wasnt aware that its a classroom textbook.  I hope I bought the right book.

Yes, that's it. It's has both recipes and other useful information regarding large quantity cooking. At the end is a whole section on budgeting, how to reduce meal cost, etc. I found it to be very helpful, and I hope that you do, too. Best of all, I think that you will find most of the recipes will suit your clients' palates. Nothing gourmet in there at all . . . . :wink:

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The meat was an inside round oven roast.  I sprinkled it with salt and pepper and dried thyme.  I made gravy with the drippings and some "bisto".   I had lots of complaints about the meat.  The seniors couldnt cut it with their butter knife so they came to the conclusion that it was overcooked.  It wasnt.  I pulled it at 155F. It was nicely pink.  I bought 7 roasts for a total of 43.15(1.79lb).  I served 42 with 4 takeouts.  I had 3 whole roasts left over.  I froze them and I'm going to make a soup with them in January. 

gallery_25969_665_1041726.jpg

I think the roast looks great!

But it did bring up an important point. If the seniors are only provided with butter knives (hope they're at least metal ones and not plastic!), then a roast, especially one cut that thickly, is not a great choice for a meal. Remember, too, we lose strength as we age, so even if you could have cut it with your butter knife, it doesn't mean they would have had the strength to do so (hypothetically, of course).

Pot roast might be a better choice for them. But then they'd probably complain that the meat were too soft!

Did they at least like the cheesecake? I'd like some of that cheesecake. And I assure you, I would definitely appreciate it! :biggrin:

Edited by prasantrin (log)
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I think they look at it like they're paying 9$ for the meal and maybe they think 9.00 is a lot of money.  I don't know though.  Its very frustrating. 

My (senior) inlaws are from Rural SW Ontario and I can tell you that these people probably do thing 9 bucks is a lot of money :biggrin:

I am really enjoying this thread.

Thanks for sharing your travails with us.

The sea was angry that day my friends... like an old man trying to send back soup in a deli.

George Costanza

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