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choux

"Making Artisan Chocolates" by Andrew Shotts

174 posts in this topic

Quite a few of the ganache recipes call for small amounts of cocoa butter (about 1/4 oz.). Since cocoa butter is not easy to source in Australia, can I simply sub a bit of heavy cream for the cocoa butter, or just leave it out altogether? I realise that either way, there will be a change in the texture of the final product. Would it be worth my while trying to track down some cocoa butter? Cheers.

I would use either a bit of extra dark chocolate (if suitable in the recipe) or find some cocoa butter. Try a health food store, they often sell big jars of pure cocoa butter for applying to your skin. Cream will just make things softer, the cocoa butter helps make the ganache firmer at room temperature.

Otherwise leave it out.

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Quite a few of the ganache recipes call for small amounts of cocoa butter (about 1/4 oz.). Since cocoa butter is not easy to source in Australia, can I simply sub a bit of heavy cream for the cocoa butter, or just leave it out altogether? I realise that either way, there will be a change in the texture of the final product. Would it be worth my while trying to track down some cocoa butter? Cheers.

i might recommend calling a local high end restaurant to see if they use cocoa butter and then trying to buy some from the restaurant. some places might be snooty about it, but you never know unless you try.

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This firm in Australia sell pure cocoa butter for making cosmetics. New Directions web site

I have used 100% pure cocoa butter from cosmetic suppliers before when I only wanted a very small amount. I would just check with them the product has been prepared and packaged ok for food use.

I have used the uk site before as they carry a wide range of natural fats/butters etc.

Jill

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OK so I finally got around to making some stuff from the book. I ordered the 'g' pectin from Chef Rubber, and tried some jellies. I hadn't made them before, since the only way I could find pectin was in 7kg buckets, and I didn't want that much. Well, it works really well, it's super easy and the results are awesome. I made the Strawberry-Balsamic and the Raspberry(no wasabi). The jellies are yummy, and the perfect texture. I really liked the flavour of the Strawberry-Balsamic.

I also tried the Salted Caramel(yummy) and the Hazelnut praline. The flavour of the Hazelnut was good, but my sucky food processer wouldn't grind the praline finely enough.

I've noticed that as the raspberry jellies have sat for a couple of days, there is a slight grainy texture on the chocolate that is in direct contact with it. Should I have let the jelly dry a little more?

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This firm in Australia sell pure cocoa butter for making cosmetics. New Directions web site

I have used 100% pure cocoa butter from cosmetic suppliers before when I only wanted a very small amount. I would just check with them the product has been prepared and packaged ok for food use.

I have used the uk site before as they carry a wide range of natural fats/butters etc.

Jill

Thank you to you and everyone else for their advice on cocoa butter. I had considered cocoa butter sold for cosmetic purposes, but I wasn't sure if they were food-safe. I will make enquiries about that. I also made enquiries about cocoa butter from confectionery producers - minimum order is 25kg! No, thanks!

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Kerry

Did you get the cocoa butter from a Canadian source?

Mark


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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Yes, I have friends who have an ingredient company (and now they also own a chocolate panning operation). They sold me the pail. They actually have their company in my home town, so it was a simple matter of just running over and picking it up. I suspect the next pail will cost me a bit more than the last. I think the source might be american, I'm not at home now so I can't look on the pail, but I'll try to remember to check for you on Wednesday evening when I get home. I do know that Qzina in Toronto sells smaller pails of cocaobarry cocoa butter, and I'm sure the Miami or San Fransisco Qzina would carry it also.

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I dipped my strawberry balsamic last night. Mom is loving them. I let them dry overnight so I'll keep a couple for a few days and see how they are. Got the salted caramel waiting to be capped off tonight and I have some leftover dark shells so I'm thinking of doing the mango mint coriander tonight. I'll do milk chocolate shells later in the week and go for the pb&j and the tequila lime.


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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My salted caramel has great color and is nice and creamy but came out a little salty. I think I need to go back and double check the measurement I used and maybe back it off a little bit with the particular salt I used. The mango mint coriander was really nice. It doesn't scream mango but the three flavors work really well together. It's nice and delicate. So far all my ganaches have been nice and soft and creamy with a wonderful mouthfeel. :wub:

Edited to say that right as soon as I posted that the caramel is too salty, coworkers are saying the caramel is the best one and I'm getting thumbs up. Just me, I guess! :raz:

Oh, and I made the caramel corn last night. Ummm....it didn't make it to work. I took a bite, looked at the batch and commented that it just wasn't enough to take to work. The general consensus in the kitchen was that it wasn't going anywhere. The words I remember hearing were, "Nope. Not gonna share." :laugh:


Edited by duckduck (log)

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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hey duck, as in the recipe, i use sel de guerande which has about 20% to 28% less sodium than table or kosher salt so that may be why it is salty...try a fleur de sel...i am happy to hear you are having success...boston globe wrote it up today, she butchered the grand marnier though....

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I have two...one is a fleur de sel guerande and the other says just sel de guerande. I used the fleur de sel. It may just be me. Everyone else liked it.


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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guerande has less sodium than just "fleur de sel" as it is unrefined and is dried by the wind... a true guerande has the smell of the ocean and is moist in the bag...some producers of "fleur de sel" can't have the same health claims as a guerande producer ...yes there are health claims....there is a lot of info on salt out there so i will not start a new topic as it will be flagged and placed in another egullet universe...just thought you might want to know...i appreciate your interest....drew....

www.garrisonconfections.com

www.notterschool.com

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guerande has less sodium than just "fleur de sel" as it is unrefined and is dried by the wind... a true guerande has the smell of the ocean and is moist in the bag...some producers of "fleur de sel" can't have the same health claims as a guerande producer ...yes there are health claims....there is a lot of info on salt out there so i will not start a new topic as it will be flagged and placed in another egullet universe...just thought you might want to know...i appreciate your interest....drew....

www.garrisonconfections.com

www.notterschool.com

Healthy benefits in caramel? Works for me, Babe! :biggrin: "Just packin' in the nurtrients here." (Said with mouth full.)


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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Humblest apologies for temporarily hijacking this thread, but it was suggested I post here to catch the attention of Mr. Schotts. I’m having trouble locating the Apple Essence product required for the candied apple ganache. Nor have I found natural apple oil to use in its place- only nasty green apple flavoring. Do you know of a mail order/on-line source where we civilians would be able to find either of those? I love the book so far, and this is one of the filling flavors in which I am most interested! Thanks in advance!


Josh Usovsky

"Will Work For Sugar"

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I will be honest, I use the apple essence that is used for jolly ranchers and blow pops. Hey, people love it. A candy making supply house should have it. I use one that only comes in large volume. I hope this helps.

Drew

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Thanks so much for the speedy reply, Drew. Is it green apple flavoring? Large volume, eh? Sounds like I'll be making apple ganache, apple sorbet, apple ice cream, apple taffy, apple hard candy, apple gianduja, apple jaconde, apple caramel, apple caramel apples, apple yogurt, apple mashed potatoes, applemeringue, apple... Oh, my poor friends...


Josh Usovsky

"Will Work For Sugar"

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Has anyone tried the Lime - Pastis? I want to try it but a bottle of Pastis costs `$20. A lot for just 1 tbsp until I know if I like the taste?

Mark


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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it tastes like pernod with a subtle touch of herbs.


www.adrianvasquez.net

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A lot of liquor stores have the tiny little one shot bottles - the kind you see on airlines.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I thought it might take some work to find pastis where I live, so I tested using a little anise extract instead. It's a very nice flavor combination, so now I have no qualms about doing the footwork to find pastis. I slowly added miniscule amounts of the extract until I thought the flavor was right. This might be an adequate experiment for you to use to test its palatability.


Josh Usovsky

"Will Work For Sugar"

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John

Not where I live, I have been looking for a bottle like that of Galliano (licorice flavored Liquor). Live in a small city.

Mark


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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Has anyone tried the Lime - Pastis? I want to try it but a bottle of Pastis costs `$20. A lot for just 1 tbsp until I know if I like the taste?

Mark

I made it subbing white Sambuca and it's been well received.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I'm planning on going for the tequila sometime this week. The guys at work are eagerly waiting! And welcome back Skwerl! It's good to see you! :raz:


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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Anna

What flavor is white Sambuca?

Mark


Mark

www.roseconfections.com

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