Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

choux

"Making Artisan Chocolates" by Andrew Shotts

Recommended Posts

Quite a few of the ganache recipes call for small amounts of cocoa butter (about 1/4 oz.). Since cocoa butter is not easy to source in Australia, can I simply sub a bit of heavy cream for the cocoa butter, or just leave it out altogether? I realise that either way, there will be a change in the texture of the final product. Would it be worth my while trying to track down some cocoa butter? Cheers.

I would use either a bit of extra dark chocolate (if suitable in the recipe) or find some cocoa butter. Try a health food store, they often sell big jars of pure cocoa butter for applying to your skin. Cream will just make things softer, the cocoa butter helps make the ganache firmer at room temperature.

Otherwise leave it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quite a few of the ganache recipes call for small amounts of cocoa butter (about 1/4 oz.). Since cocoa butter is not easy to source in Australia, can I simply sub a bit of heavy cream for the cocoa butter, or just leave it out altogether? I realise that either way, there will be a change in the texture of the final product. Would it be worth my while trying to track down some cocoa butter? Cheers.

i might recommend calling a local high end restaurant to see if they use cocoa butter and then trying to buy some from the restaurant. some places might be snooty about it, but you never know unless you try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This firm in Australia sell pure cocoa butter for making cosmetics. New Directions web site

I have used 100% pure cocoa butter from cosmetic suppliers before when I only wanted a very small amount. I would just check with them the product has been prepared and packaged ok for food use.

I have used the uk site before as they carry a wide range of natural fats/butters etc.

Jill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK so I finally got around to making some stuff from the book. I ordered the 'g' pectin from Chef Rubber, and tried some jellies. I hadn't made them before, since the only way I could find pectin was in 7kg buckets, and I didn't want that much. Well, it works really well, it's super easy and the results are awesome. I made the Strawberry-Balsamic and the Raspberry(no wasabi). The jellies are yummy, and the perfect texture. I really liked the flavour of the Strawberry-Balsamic.

I also tried the Salted Caramel(yummy) and the Hazelnut praline. The flavour of the Hazelnut was good, but my sucky food processer wouldn't grind the praline finely enough.

I've noticed that as the raspberry jellies have sat for a couple of days, there is a slight grainy texture on the chocolate that is in direct contact with it. Should I have let the jelly dry a little more?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This firm in Australia sell pure cocoa butter for making cosmetics. New Directions web site

I have used 100% pure cocoa butter from cosmetic suppliers before when I only wanted a very small amount. I would just check with them the product has been prepared and packaged ok for food use.

I have used the uk site before as they carry a wide range of natural fats/butters etc.

Jill

Thank you to you and everyone else for their advice on cocoa butter. I had considered cocoa butter sold for cosmetic purposes, but I wasn't sure if they were food-safe. I will make enquiries about that. I also made enquiries about cocoa butter from confectionery producers - minimum order is 25kg! No, thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's taken me a couple of years, and lots of friends who also use it but I've finally reached the end of my 35 lb bucket of cocoa butter. Next week I'm going to order my second one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kerry

Did you get the cocoa butter from a Canadian source?

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I have friends who have an ingredient company (and now they also own a chocolate panning operation). They sold me the pail. They actually have their company in my home town, so it was a simple matter of just running over and picking it up. I suspect the next pail will cost me a bit more than the last. I think the source might be american, I'm not at home now so I can't look on the pail, but I'll try to remember to check for you on Wednesday evening when I get home. I do know that Qzina in Toronto sells smaller pails of cocaobarry cocoa butter, and I'm sure the Miami or San Fransisco Qzina would carry it also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dipped my strawberry balsamic last night. Mom is loving them. I let them dry overnight so I'll keep a couple for a few days and see how they are. Got the salted caramel waiting to be capped off tonight and I have some leftover dark shells so I'm thinking of doing the mango mint coriander tonight. I'll do milk chocolate shells later in the week and go for the pb&j and the tequila lime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My salted caramel has great color and is nice and creamy but came out a little salty. I think I need to go back and double check the measurement I used and maybe back it off a little bit with the particular salt I used. The mango mint coriander was really nice. It doesn't scream mango but the three flavors work really well together. It's nice and delicate. So far all my ganaches have been nice and soft and creamy with a wonderful mouthfeel. :wub:

Edited to say that right as soon as I posted that the caramel is too salty, coworkers are saying the caramel is the best one and I'm getting thumbs up. Just me, I guess! :raz:

Oh, and I made the caramel corn last night. Ummm....it didn't make it to work. I took a bite, looked at the batch and commented that it just wasn't enough to take to work. The general consensus in the kitchen was that it wasn't going anywhere. The words I remember hearing were, "Nope. Not gonna share." :laugh:


Edited by duckduck (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hey duck, as in the recipe, i use sel de guerande which has about 20% to 28% less sodium than table or kosher salt so that may be why it is salty...try a fleur de sel...i am happy to hear you are having success...boston globe wrote it up today, she butchered the grand marnier though....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two...one is a fleur de sel guerande and the other says just sel de guerande. I used the fleur de sel. It may just be me. Everyone else liked it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

guerande has less sodium than just "fleur de sel" as it is unrefined and is dried by the wind... a true guerande has the smell of the ocean and is moist in the bag...some producers of "fleur de sel" can't have the same health claims as a guerande producer ...yes there are health claims....there is a lot of info on salt out there so i will not start a new topic as it will be flagged and placed in another egullet universe...just thought you might want to know...i appreciate your interest....drew....

www.garrisonconfections.com

www.notterschool.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
guerande has less sodium than just "fleur de sel" as it is unrefined and is dried by the wind... a true guerande has the smell of the ocean and is moist in the bag...some producers of "fleur de sel" can't have the same health claims as a guerande producer ...yes there are health claims....there is a lot of info on salt out there so i will not start a new topic as it will be flagged and placed in another egullet universe...just thought you might want to know...i appreciate your interest....drew....

www.garrisonconfections.com

www.notterschool.com

Healthy benefits in caramel? Works for me, Babe! :biggrin: "Just packin' in the nurtrients here." (Said with mouth full.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Humblest apologies for temporarily hijacking this thread, but it was suggested I post here to catch the attention of Mr. Schotts. I’m having trouble locating the Apple Essence product required for the candied apple ganache. Nor have I found natural apple oil to use in its place- only nasty green apple flavoring. Do you know of a mail order/on-line source where we civilians would be able to find either of those? I love the book so far, and this is one of the filling flavors in which I am most interested! Thanks in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will be honest, I use the apple essence that is used for jolly ranchers and blow pops. Hey, people love it. A candy making supply house should have it. I use one that only comes in large volume. I hope this helps.

Drew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for the speedy reply, Drew. Is it green apple flavoring? Large volume, eh? Sounds like I'll be making apple ganache, apple sorbet, apple ice cream, apple taffy, apple hard candy, apple gianduja, apple jaconde, apple caramel, apple caramel apples, apple yogurt, apple mashed potatoes, applemeringue, apple... Oh, my poor friends...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone tried the Lime - Pastis? I want to try it but a bottle of Pastis costs `$20. A lot for just 1 tbsp until I know if I like the taste?

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought it might take some work to find pastis where I live, so I tested using a little anise extract instead. It's a very nice flavor combination, so now I have no qualms about doing the footwork to find pastis. I slowly added miniscule amounts of the extract until I thought the flavor was right. This might be an adequate experiment for you to use to test its palatability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John

Not where I live, I have been looking for a bottle like that of Galliano (licorice flavored Liquor). Live in a small city.

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Has anyone tried the Lime - Pastis? I want to try it but a bottle of Pastis costs `$20. A lot for just 1 tbsp until I know if I like the taste?

Mark

I made it subbing white Sambuca and it's been well received.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm planning on going for the tequila sometime this week. The guys at work are eagerly waiting! And welcome back Skwerl! It's good to see you! :raz:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By jedovaty
      Hi:
       
      I'm making some homemade peanut butter cups, but shaping them like bon bons instead.  I don't have bon bon molds, so instead I'm dipping the peanut butter centers into tempered chocolate.  As the chocolate coating sets, it contracts and my soft peanut butter center squirts out a little.  Is there a way to prevent this, or do I need to do a second dipping?  I've tried with both frozen and room temp centers (although peanut butter with a little vanilla, salt, and powdered sugar doesn't seem to freeze at all).
    • By Kasia
      Chocolate cake with plums
       
      The first cake I ever dared to bake by myself was a chocolate cake. I have since baked it many times, always using the same recipe, and many times I have spoiled it at the beginning of preparation. It is necessary to cool down the chocolate mixture before adding the rest of the ingredients. On a hot summer day this process is very long, so I accelerated it by putting the pot with the mixture into some cold water in the kitchen sink. Many times, by mistake, I turned on the tap and poured water onto the cooling mixture. In hindsight these situations were amusing, but at the time it wasn't funny.

      This chocolate cake is excellent without any additives. You can enrich it with your favourite nuts or butter icing. Today I added some plums to the top of the cake. It was great and its sweet chocolate-plum aroma lingered long in my home.

      Ingredients (25cm cake tin):
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      3 tablespoons of cocoa
      120g of brown sugar
      15ml of almond milk
      100g of dark chocolate
      1 egg
      1 teaspoon of baking powder
      plums

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Smooth the cake tin with the butter and sprinkle with dark cocoa.
      Put the butter, milk, sugar, cocoa and chocolate into the pan. Heat it until the chocolate is melted and all the ingredients have blended together well. Leave the mixture to cool down. Add the egg, flour and baking soda and mix them in. Put the dough into the cake tin. Wash the plums, cut them in half and remove the stones. Arrange the plum halves skin side down on top of the cake. Bake for 50 minutes. Sprinkle with caster sugar before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Kerry Beal
      It's that time again - I'm the group leader for a group of newly minted Ecole Chocolat grads taking a masters course. This one is in Wieze, Belgium. You may recall my last trip as group leader for Ecole when I took a group to Valrhona in France.
       
      I got my packing done on Sunday - was all prepared, car was to pick me up at 6 pm to drive me to the airport. Got a little suspicious when the child was late getting off the bus from school - the driver said that the highway wasn't moving well. At about 5:15 I got a call from the limo service to say that the car that was coming to get me had moved 2 car lengths in the last 30 minutes. Apparently a car roll over on the westbound lanes of highway had ejected two people into the eastbound lanes and the entire highway was closed in both directions.
       
      So I set out in my own vehicle - which of course had no gas, and needed oil... at least the toll highway got me past the problem.  Airport wants $175/week to park - so a quick text to @Alleguede and he came to fetch my car from the airport to park in his driveway until I return.
       
      So here I sit in the lounge awaiting my departure.
       
      I'm doing the Jet Lag program that I have done several times before that has worked well for me. Overcoming Jet Lag, by Charles F. Ehret and Lynne Waller Scanlon. This involves food and caffeine modification. So for the past 4 days I've been drinking Rooibos Provence throughout the day and between 3 and 4:30 slugging down as much real tea as my bladder can handle! The dietary part consists of alternating days of 'feasting' and 'fasting' with high protein breakfasts and lunches and high carb dinners. I had planned to get the driver to stop at the Tim Horton's at the top of my street to pick up the black coffee that is to be taken at around 6 pm the day of travel - unfortunately as I was driving myself that didn't happen - so when I hit the lounge I drank down two cups of strong black caffeinated coffee - better late than never. I'm not much of a coffee drinker - and particularly not black. Should be good for some palpitations when I start the next part of the program which is to sleep as soon as I get on the plane!
       
      This is a 'fasting day', 800 calories suggested - I left my carb meal until I reached the lounge.
       

       
      ]
       
      One of the two cups of coffee.
       

       
      These are the "Gentlemen Retire to the Library' chocolates that I posted before that I am taking along - port wine PDF and tobacco ganache. I used Sosa tobacco flavouring this time instead of a cigar so I don't have to concern myself with nicotine poisoning.
       
       
       
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×