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NY trip report


hhlodesign
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Sentiamo: I like Humboldt Fog very much. Enjoy your time with the expert! :)

alanamoana: We should start up a collection for 66 hours in Paris.  :wink:

Thank you both for this wonderful thread. Which restaurant did you find the food better, Bouley or Jean-Georges??

I enjoyed the food at both, and as Henry mentioned, it is hard to compare a lunch (simpler preparations, less expensive) to a tasting menu at dinner. I also agree with what he said that the Jean Georges lunch dishes seemed to be consistency very good, while Bouley had an excellent dish and some merely good ones.

If you can send me a plane ticket and pay for a tasting menu at Jean Georges, I will be happy to give you a more detailed response comparing the merits of both restaurants. :wink:

Thank you both very much. Your culinary journey has been a treat. Have been to Bouley, not Jean-Georges and wondered how they compared. Bouley used to be outstanding and I felt that I has gone down a notch. Now it's on to J-G!

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hey ling, what's the clear gelee next to the chocolate box from the gordon ramsay chocolate cremeux dessert?

I don't know--the server set the dessert down and the photographer started snapping pictures so she didn't get a chance to explain what the components were. I think Henry ate the gelee, because I don't remember eating it. Maybe it was kirsch...I remember berry flavours, but that could've been from the layer of raspberry underneath the cremeux.

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This is an absolutely mouth-watering account of what looks to be one incredibly well thought out foodie expedition to NYC. I'm planning a trip early this coming year and will use your itinerary as a guide. Thank you so much for such a detailed and yummy travelogue!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Henry/Ling --

New York Magazine posted a photo of when we were there that night. I think this was our selection of cocktails and my arm. Here.

John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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That's DEFINITELY your arm.  I'd recognize it anywhere.

Lol, thanks Sneak! I remember this shot as I was blinded for 3 minutes afterwards from his 100000 candlepower flash.

John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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Henry/Ling: You guys are my heroes, fitting so much into that amount of time. I always plan food itineraries that require eating 4 or 5 meals a day but things like visiting old friends or sightseeeing always get in the way. We're going to NYC again in May and now I know the key is to stay up eating until 4:30 am. :smile:

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Henry/Ling --

New York Magazine posted a photo of when we were there that night.   I think this was our selection of cocktails and my arm.  Here.

That's great! Your arm is famous, and now we have the missing pic of some of our Pegu Club cocktails!

kiliki: The more hours to stay awake, the more hours there are to eat... :smile: What's funny is I sent my mom the link to our Flickr pictures, and she only looked at our Day 1 pics and was astounded at how much food we put away. Then I had to tell her that was just the first day... :wink:

Edited by Ling (log)
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Depends upon what you appreciate from a loaf of bread.  Tall Grass is the only bakery in Seattle that, at this moment, is using starter-only-raised bread, with only a few exceptions.  Of course, the resulting loaves have a denser, more cake-like crumb [/snip]

A local food writer read the discussion on page 1 about Tall Grass bread and told me that their bread used to be better, but has recently become overly dense (which echoes my complaint.) I've only been in Seattle for a few months, so it might be that I've only had their bread when it took a bit of a nosedive...we bought one of their baguettes this week to give it another shot, and I still don't enjoy it very much.

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Tis threads like these that make me remember that food in Vancouver and Toronto is soo delayed. Never been to Katz as 2nd Ave was my fav but since it closed (sic and forced) I may need to check it out on my next Canali and Rotenier run with the wife. Looking for some shark links. Way to avoid jet lag from the west is to not go to sleep. Looks like I am sure you had no jet lag.

officially left egullet....

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  • 2 weeks later...
Don't tell me .... you also meet Anthony Bourdain on your trip!?! :biggrin:

Not on this trip, but make sure you watch the Pacific Northwest episode of No Reservations. I think it airs Jan. 22nd. :wink:

Henry and Lorna - I got a chance to catch No Reservations last night and I have a few questions:

1. How do I get an invite to one of those Gypsy Dinners?

2. Who was that Chef and where does he normally cook?

3. Was that your house?

4. What was the "donation" per person for that Dinner?

5. Is that a typical menu for a Gypsy Dinner or was this kicked up a bit for Bourdain?

6. How was AB off camera? Same persona?

7. Can I have your autographs? :biggrin:

Edited by bgut1 (log)
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Don't tell me .... you also meet Anthony Bourdain on your trip!?! :biggrin:

Not on this trip, but make sure you watch the Pacific Northwest episode of No Reservations. I think it airs Jan. 22nd. :wink:

Henry and Lorna - I got a chance to catch No Reservations last night and I have a few questions:

1. How do I get an invite to one of those Gypsy Dinners?

2. Who was that Chef and where does he normally cook?

3. Was that your house?

4. What was the "donation" per person for that Dinner?

5. Is that a typical menu for a Gypsy Dinner or was this kicked up a bit for Bourdain?

6. How was AB off camera? Same persona?

7. Can I have your autographs? :biggrin:

1. Here's a link to the site:

Gypsy

They supposedly make you write an essay to get in, but if you already know a member, you're in.

2. Chef Gabriel is CIA educated. I'm not sure where he used to cook, but he now runs a cooking school called Culinary Communion.

3. The house belongs to some friends of ours. Robbie and Louis who were sitting at the end of the table with us. The house was designed by a firm I used to work for called Stuart Silk Architects.

4. Donations vary per dinner. They range from $35 to $150 plus tip. This particular dinner was free for us. We happen to be friends with the person that did PR for Gypsy (Traca, "would kill for a diver scallop.") When NR and Gypsy were looking for a nice house with a view of the lake, gourmet kitchen, and gorgeous dining room; Traca asked me if I knew of a good fit. I said I knew of the perfect house. This was not an ordinary Gypsy. All the guests were invited. There was us, the couple that owned the house, Traca, a Seattle food writer, and some friends of Tony's in the restaurant business. Gabriel recreated the menu for a dinner a few weeks later that he charged $200 (I think) for.

5. I've only been to a handful of Gypsy events, but this one was much more ambitious than usual.

6. AB is exactly the same person on and off camera.

7. Sure :biggrin:

Tony mentioned that at most dinner parties, he goes around the table with the same question, "You are going to die a horrible death tomorrow morning; what would your final meal tonight be?" We circle the table hearing stock answers of steak, foie gras, mac and cheese. My answer was my mom's ma puo tofu. When we get to Lorna, she excitedly shouts, "A KILOGRAM OF AMEDEI PORCELANA CHOCOLATE!" :laugh: That's where her subtitle came from.

Side note, We also got an invite to the Salumi lunch in the last segment, but Lorna and I were flying to LA that day. Shucks! :angry:

Edited by hhlodesign (log)
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Don't tell me .... you also meet Anthony Bourdain on your trip!?! :biggrin:

Not on this trip, but make sure you watch the Pacific Northwest episode of No Reservations. I think it airs Jan. 22nd. :wink:

Henry and Lorna - I got a chance to catch No Reservations last night and I have a few questions:

1. How do I get an invite to one of those Gypsy Dinners?

2. Who was that Chef and where does he normally cook?

3. Was that your house?

4. What was the "donation" per person for that Dinner?

5. Is that a typical menu for a Gypsy Dinner or was this kicked up a bit for Bourdain?

6. How was AB off camera? Same persona?

7. Can I have your autographs? :biggrin:

1. Here's a link to the site:

Gypsy

They supposedly make you write an essay to get in, but if you already know a member, you're in.

2. Chef Gabriel is CIA educated. I'm not sure where he used to cook, but he now runs a cooking school called Culinary Communion.

3. The house belongs to some friends of ours. Robbie and Louis who were sitting at the end of the table with us. The house was designed by a firm I used to work for called Stuart Silk Architects.

4. Donations vary per dinner. They range from $35 to $150 plus tip. This particular dinner was free for us. We happen to be friends with the person that did PR for Gypsy (Traca, "would kill for a diver scallop.") When NR and Gypsy were looking for a nice house with a view of the lake, gourmet kitchen, and gorgeous dining room; Traca asked me if I knew of a good fit. I said I knew of the perfect house. This was not an ordinary Gypsy. All the guests were invited. There was us, the couple that owned the house, Traca, a Seattle food writer, and some friends of Tony's in the restaurant business. Gabriel recreated the menu for a dinner a few weeks later that he charged $200 (I think) for.

5. I've only been to a handful of Gypsy events, but this one was much more ambitious than usual.

6. AB is exactly the same person on and off camera.

7. Sure :biggrin:

Tony mentioned that at most dinner parties, he goes around the table with the same question, "You are going to die a horrible death tomorrow morning; what would your final meal tonight be?" We circle the table hearing stock answers of steak, foie gras, mac and cheese. My answer was my mom's ma puo tofu. When we get to Lorna, she excitedly shouts, "A KILOGRAM OF AMEDEI PORCELANA CHOCOLATE!" :laugh: That's where her subtitle came from.

Side note, We also got an invite to the Salumi lunch in the last segment, but Lorna and I were flying to LA that day. Shucks! :angry:

Henry - Thanks for the detailed response. It adds just a little bit more to a great episode of No Reservations. I would love to have had a chance to meet AB in such an environment. It looked like you missed a great lunch at Salumi - but just how lucky can two people be? :smile: I've never heard of Amedei Chocolate but if its the last thing Lorna would eat, I'm sure its great. I've noticed that you can get the Porcelana bars at Amazon, so I'm sure to order a couple (but not two pounds - sorry Lorna). My regards.

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hey ling, what's the clear gelee next to the chocolate box from the gordon ramsay chocolate cremeux dessert?

I don't know--the server set the dessert down and the photographer started snapping pictures so she didn't get a chance to explain what the components were. I think Henry ate the gelee, because I don't remember eating it. Maybe it was kirsch...I remember berry flavours, but that could've been from the layer of raspberry underneath the cremeux.

It's a gin gelee. Fairly mild; I'd love to know the technique (anyone can make 'jello shots' with vodka or gin, but this was much more delicate/melty), but I found it nothing especially interesting from a culinary perspective. I'd expect much better from an Englishman when gin is involved. :wink:

The dessert itself was very nice as a whole when I had it just over 2 weeks ago; the gelee just didn't add much.

-Dayne aka TallDrinkOfWater

###

"Let's get down to business. For the gin connoisseur, a Martini garnish varies by his or her mood. Need a little get-up-and-go?---lemon twist. Wednesday night and had a half-tough day at the office?---olive. Found out you're gonna have group sex with Gwen Stefani and Scarlett Johansson at midnight?---pour yourself a pickled onion Gibson Martini at 8:00, sharp." - Lonnie Bruner, DC Drinks

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  • 2 months later...

Since this seems to be a "dead' thread (no posts in over a month) I'll add a note from right field. This tasting tour is great, one of a kind, but so unlike a New Yorker's experience of our scene. It reminds me of my experience of the Paris food scene - with brief extensive episodes separated by big blocks of time. Certain thrills that are great the first time burn a bit too bright, and certain disappointments (the soup dumplings at Joe's Shanghai for example) that may not be international experiences but are quite nice as cheap eats disappoint. So if anyone cares, I'd opine that I may have had one of my best meals in nyc in some years at Jean George, but have not been (or needed to return) for some time. It satisfies that need for a 'special' experience. I've eaten many more times at WD-50 (loving the high wire act, creativity, and sublimity of the dishes that do excel, and understanding those (like the pork belly)that do not fit into a 3 course format - this is the restaurant at which I felt it was ok to order the Chicken dish and had a sublime reward) as well as Cafe Boulud during the Carmellini years. I think the many comments confirm the rap on David Bouley - when things go well it is like a gift from heaven-sometimes unmatchable, but sometimes you are brought down to earth by ridiculous stuff like waiting forever for a 'simple' course. Back in the day (80's ?) no one in NYC could cook on his level - now there are a lot of talented chefs out there.

Glad you got to Katzes - that's real NY (personally I drink cream soda with pastrami, never got the attraction of cel-ray). Too bad you did not visit NYC when the spicier "Roumanian" pastrami was available at Shmulkuh Bernstein's.

Thanks so much for the report - enjoyed heartily.

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