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"The 150 Best American Recipes"


Lori in PA
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No, no, Marlene, you've got to do the tomatoes -- we're counting on you for a report. Don't think of it as mind-numbing kitchen tedium, think of it as egullet research. Marlene, intrepid reporter, sacrifices her finger joints to the cause...

~ Lori in PA

My blog: http://inmykitcheninmylife.blogspot.com/

My egullet blog: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=89647&hl=

"Cooking is not a chore, it is a joy."

- Julia Child

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I've really enjoyed this cookbook.  I love the way Molly organizes cookbooks -- at the beginning of every chapter is an index of the recipes in that particular chapter including page numbers.  She does a nice job of introducing each recipe, and there are tips and notes throughout.  And, you don't have to flip a page to read the rest of the recipe.

So far, I've made the sausage/pasta dish (like Lori), the maple toast cups with eggs, the pork chile verde with posole, the sausage/grape dish, and the frozen lemon cream sandwiches.

Two comments on the recipes I've done.  The posole (I made mine with leftover smoked pork) was so good the kids wanted it for dessert.  This one will become a standby; using leftover meat makes this a very fast on the table dish.

The frozen lemon cream sandwiches were also outstanding, but a couple of notes.  The cookies called for were expensive, and came 8 to a package, and the recipe calls for 12 of them.  And, these are very rich, and they were just flat way too big.  So, for our Xmas Eve meal, I'll be piping the filling into krumkake (sp?) for a more manageable size.

My kids are enchanted with this cookbook.  I usually get the kids a joint gift every Xmas, and I think this might be it.

How was the sausage/grapes dish?? That one looks really good to me!

Edited by DanaG (log)
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I seem to remember Susan saying she didn' t like the sausage/grape dish, but I loved it. My family liked it fine, but it wasn't a huge favorite.

~ Lori in PA

My blog: http://inmykitcheninmylife.blogspot.com/

My egullet blog: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=89647&hl=

"Cooking is not a chore, it is a joy."

- Julia Child

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So, has anybody else been playing with this book? Tell me.

I have one book in this series: the 1999 one. I see the recipes you are mentioning, but as I read further in this thread, it is not clear as to what volume folks are using.

I am looking for the recipes that everyone is mentioning, and I am wondering if you all are using different volumes? I think there is a volume for every year since.

Some of the recipes that are mentioned are not in the 1999 volume.

Christine

Edited by artisan02 (log)
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I have one book in this series: the 1999 one. I see the recipes you are mentioning, but as I read further in this thread, it is not clear as to what volume folks are using  I have one book in this series: the 1999 one. I see the recipes you are mentioning, but as I read further in this thread, it is not clear as to what volume folks are using.

I

am looking for the recipes that everyone is mentioning, and I am wondering if you all are using different volumes? I think there is a volume for every year since.

Some of the recipes that are mentioned are not in the 1999 volume.

Christine

I have all the volumes as well, but the recipes everyone are talking about are in the latest one, 150 Best American

Edited by Marlene (log)

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I have all the volumes as well, but the recipes everyone are talking about are in the latest one,  150 Best American

Hmm..that is strange. Some of the recipes that you all have mentioned are in the 1999 volume. Actually quite a few of them are. Wonder what happened,why they chose to repeat them?

Christine

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They collected favorites from the older cookbooks. It's kind of a best of the past decade. I'm not sure if all the recipes in this edition did appear in the individual yearly books. Credits in the back show the original publication. So while there were many wonderful recipes in those books, not all of them made it into this one.

Hope this clarifies things.

jayne

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So, has anybody else been playing with this book? Tell me.

I have one book in this series: the 1999 one. I see the recipes you are mentioning, but as I read further in this thread, it is not clear as to what volume folks are using.

I am looking for the recipes that everyone is mentioning, and I am wondering if you all are using different volumes? I think there is a volume for every year since.

Some of the recipes that are mentioned are not in the 1999 volume.

Christine

The thread is referring to the latest (and LAST) in the series -- "The 150 Best American Recipes." This volume includes recipes from all years (and beyond).

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  • 2 weeks later...

this is a makeover story... er, stories...

snatched this book from the local library and having all ingredients available i had to try potato and green chili gratin first. i was ready for a zesty, creamy soft potato gratin [or why bother to peel all the potatoes].

i was less then pleased with the original result. the potatoes didn't feel or taste done. i ended up adding a can of evap milk with a scant tbsp of flour stirred into it to give the potatoes enough creaminess and body to be a gratin. the flavor was good in the end although the texture was never right to me. my oven temp was correct, i baked them an additional 45 minutes to make them edible. could something be wrong with all my potatoes in the dish... :hmmm:

however... a slice of this made a tasty fritatta the next morning after nuking the hell out of the gratin in parchment before mixing them with eggs and sliced scallions. i baked the fritatta slowly on stovetop in a small cast iron skillet. served with toasted sourdough sunflower seed rye bread [bba] smeared with soft wisconsin brick cheese and grape tomatoes.

the remainder of the dish i riced to mush and made two wondrous loaves of no knead garlic/poblano potato bread with my barm, loosely based on reinhart's bba potato rosemary bread. this is the most delicious potato bread i've ever had, mine or anyone's. :wub: several other people i fed today moaned in pleasure also. :biggrin:

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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this is a makeover story... er, stories...

snatched this book from the local library and having all ingredients available i had to try potato and green chili gratin first. i was ready for a zesty, creamy soft potato gratin [or why bother to peel all the potatoes].

i was less then pleased with the original result. the potatoes didn't feel or taste done. i ended up adding a can of evap milk with a scant tbsp of flour stirred into it to give the potatoes enough creaminess and body to be a gratin. the flavor was good in the end although the texture was never right to me. my oven temp was correct, i baked them an additional 45 minutes to make them edible. could something be wrong with all my potatoes in the dish...  :hmmm:

however... a slice of this made a tasty fritatta the next morning after nuking the hell out of the gratin in parchment before mixing them with eggs and sliced scallions. i baked the fritatta slowly on stovetop in a small cast iron skillet. served with toasted sourdough sunflower seed rye bread [bba] smeared with soft wisconsin brick cheese and grape tomatoes.

the remainder of the dish i riced to mush and made two wondrous loaves of no knead garlic/poblano potato bread with my barm, loosely based on reinhart's bba potato rosemary bread. this is the most delicious potato bread i've ever had, mine or anyone's.  :wub: several other people i fed today moaned in pleasure also.  :biggrin:

Talk about "if life gives you lemons"...........errr......potatoes!

Wonderfully inventive. No use letting all those good flavors go to waste :wink:

Kathy

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this is the most delicious potato bread i've ever had, mine or anyone's.  :wub: several other people i fed today moaned in pleasure also.  :biggrin:

:biggrin: And this is how great recipes are invented. :smile::wink:

The potato recipe worked great for me the three times I tried it. Maybe someone sold you some wierd potatoes . . .but now that you have to make the bread again you'll have to make the original recipe again, I guess, to find out. :huh:

:rolleyes:

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I've cooked a few things from this book. The Parsi Deviled eggs-just ok for me-they weren't my favorite flavor combos. I tried two versions of the vodka spiked tomatoes-one version blanched and peeled and the other without blanching and peeling. Peeling is definitely worth the effort. These are really addictive!

Tonight, the shrimp with grits and garlic roasted green beans. Both delicious!

gallery_15437_3722_523270.jpg

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I've cooked a few things from this book.  The Parsi Deviled eggs-just ok for me-they weren't my favorite flavor combos.  I tried two versions of the vodka spiked tomatoes-one version blanched and peeled and the other without blanching and peeling. Peeling is definitely worth the effort.  These are really addictive!

Tonight, the shrimp with grits and garlic roasted green beans.  Both delicious!

gallery_15437_3722_523270.jpg

Mmm, I'm drooling! Those shrimp look delicious!!

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  • 1 month later...

I tried another recipe from this book this weekend, and it was a hit! I made the spaghetti with slow-roasted cherry tomatoes, basil and parmesan. I used grape tomatoes, but roasting them at a low temp for several hours really brought out their sweetness! A really simple dish with great results. I look forward to trying more recipes from this book!

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After making breakfast this morning for weekend guests, I was prompted to return to this thread. The Amazing Overnight Waffles were truly amazing... crisp on the outside and craemy on the inside (although I DID add mini -chocolate chips to the batter). Yesterday I made the String Beans with Fennel and Tomatoes. Rigatoni alla Toto was simple, and great with a nice crusty bread (for dipping into the rich sauce in the bottom of our bowls) and a big salad. I forgot about that one!

The Salsa Baked Goat Cheese has become a Go To recipe for company. Sweet and Spicy Pecans are always a hit. I've been making Marcy Goldma's Matzo Buttercrunch for years, pounds and pounds and pounds of it.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I've made the lemon posset twice now and it's delicious. I had never heard of this dessert before tasting it at St. John's in London a few months ago. It has the great taste of fresh lemon since the juice is not actually cooked. Sugar and cream are heated, then lemon juice is stirred in and the mixture is left to thicken in the fridge.

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Based on the reviews I read in this thread, I bought the current (and apparently last) edition of this book. I totally love it. It seems as though every recipe is one I'd like to make.

I agree about the pasta with the slow-roasted grape tomatoes, it was completely orgasmic....... :wub:.

I've also made the Italian sausages and grapes with the accompanying smashed potatoes, which were both delightful.

On the agenda for this up-coming week is the asparagus/lemon pasta. I'm glad to see that you liked it DanaG and I will keep in mind the tip to add some of the lemon juice as well as the zest.

I think I'm going to be cooking things from this collection for a very long time.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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I've made the lemon posset twice now and it's delicious. I had never heard of this dessert before tasting it at St. John's in London a few months ago. It has the great taste of fresh lemon since the juice is not actually cooked. Sugar and cream are heated, then lemon juice is stirred in and the mixture is left to thicken in the fridge.

Thanks for the heads up on this recipe! I made it this weekend, with a fresh blueberry sauce on top, and it was delish!

I also made the cucumber and celery salad (so refreshing!) and the double chocolate layer cake (holy deliciousness, Batman).

I'm having so much fun with this book. Those maple toast cups are calling my name...

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  • 3 months later...

I made another winner from this cookbook last night: the chicken with lemon, sage, rosemary and thyme. The alioli you rub under the skin imparts such a wonderful flavor. The recipe calls for thighs, but my grocery store was out of thights with the bones and skin, so I used a whole chicken cut into 8 pieces and it worked just fine!

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The Zuni Cafe's Roast Chicken and Bread Salad is in here (Wow -- how did I not know about this? Maybe because I live far from Zuni Cafe

I highly recommend getting a copy of the Zuni Cafe cook book. I was reading through a few chapters yesterday, refreshing information and looking for some sugestions. I've eaten at the Zuni for years - Judy Rogers' book is as exceptional as her food. BTW, the roast chicken is one of her more popular dishes at the cafe, as is her Caesar salad.

Shel

 ... Shel


 

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