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Which one of these is not like the other?


Gustibus
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Anyone out there have any firm opinions on things that do NOT go together? I'm making a list for a friend who likes to make things sometimes but slides away from recipes as inevitably as butter would off a hot teflon roof. i figure a basic list of such things will cut down on the experimentation time. Here are some examples:

Oil and water - The result can be very exciting if done when the oil is hot.

Beaten eggs added to anything hot – you will inevitably get scrambled eggs. So prepare for this contingency.

Melted butter and any cold liquid – Many little buttery flotation devices.

Acids and Milk – Curdles milk. Mmm.

Flour and hot liquids- You will get gross tasting dumplings.

Sugar and fresh vegetables - do not taste good together.

so anything that does not mix, in other words - chemically, pallet-wise, or logistically. whatever. thanks

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flour and hot liquids is bad? what about all those dumpling wrapper recipes that have you put hot water into your flour? or, dumplings that you drop on your pork & sauerkraut dishes?

sugar and fresh veggies isn't necessarily bad either. the classic cucumber and tomato salad, uses apple cider vinegar and sugar as a dressing.

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sugar and fresh veggies isn't necessarily bad either.  the classic cucumber and tomato salad, uses apple cider vinegar and sugar as a dressing.

And sometimes fresh corn can use a touch of sugar if it's not as sweet as it should be.....

"Fat is money." (Per a cracklings maker shown on Dirty Jobs.)
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Beaten eggs added to anything hot – you will inevitably get scrambled eggs. So prepare for this contingency.

Um...spaghetti carbonara. The heat of the pasta cooks the eggs, creating this wonderfully creamy sauce.

Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

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Cappuccino Parmigiano

* * *

Beets, broccoli, turnips, cauliflower, horseradish, cabbage, etc. should not go in a stockpot with chicken, water, onion, carrots, salt and celery.

When preparing spinach with anchovies and garlic, sautéing broccoli rabe, braising or just sweating vegetables, it's customary to add water to oil, safety tip about avoiding accidents aside.

Sicilians combine fish and cheese. So does McDonald's, though an Aretine might sneer. Chocolate goes with rabbit in main courses and eggplant or ground meats in sweet pastries. Speaking of eggplant, some people actually like it baked into eggy custards. Same with seafood. There are plenty of menus and recipes that demonstrate how dishes that repulse me delight others.

Let your friend experiment and use common sense. Many people don't care much for recipes or cookbooks. If it's only a matter of not wishing to "paint by numbers" in the kitchen, there are quite a few books out there that provide a foundation in basic techniques. There are also books like Donna Hay's Flavours which demonstrate how to build a dish from one basic flavor, such as vanilla or lime. Who knows if s/he'd want to read them? Your friend may prefer to learn by going to a variety of restaurants or being inspired by a meal at someone else's table.

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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flour and hot liquids is bad?  what about all those dumpling wrapper recipes that have you put hot water into your flour?  or, dumplings that you drop on your pork & sauerkraut dishes?

lets not forget pate a choux. It has both flour and hot liquids and beaten eggs.

Bode

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Wisked eggs with parmasean poured into Wedding Soup is delicious. Of course, the point is to cook the egg.

Really, learning the concept of tempering the eggs will be far more helpful than to say they can't be added to anything hot. Think of the dishes that would eliminate.

Vinegar added to milk makes a great tenderizer for chicken in leiu of buttermilk.

Hot oil and water is a good point. Morever, be sure that food is patted dry before adding to hot oil.

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These were just general things that would happen that someone might not really think about. I didnt mean absolutely under any circumstances dont, sorry about the misunderstanding.

thank you anyway, but you all probably cook with some proficiency, and although you know how good spaghetti carbonara is, and although you have made a salad dressing before, and although you know what dumplings are, that does not mean for people who have NO idea about cooking it doesn't make sense to just, for example, add flour to a hot sauce to thicken it (not with the INTENTION of making dumplings). Or in a very simple pudding, adding eggs to hot milk. or why not throw some brussel sprouts with some sugar? sugar tastes good...? these sorts of things.

Ok, ok, true enough im sure there is someone out there who adores brussel sprouts and sugar. or a sharp cheese and sugar. Or whatever. I was just looking for some opinions, which are sometimes ok to voice without any equivocation. im not talking prohibitive bans, but general guidelines. i suppose its hard to put yourselves in the position of someone who is not quite so...energetic...about food and just wants to be able to make some things, to not be completely ignorant in the kitchen. i doubt theyll find themselves making pate a choux. so thanks, but it has to be simpler.

And sugar dissolved in vinegar is one thing. Straight sugar is something very different. With corn, ok. But over onions? if you have seen it as i have, you would include that proviso as well. And i bet youve also never heard (since it was over the phone) a cup of water being poured into a pan of hot oil.

that vinegar in milk, however, is great idea, never thought of that. thanks. but it still curdles the milk, doesnt it?

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