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Boulangerie Poujauran/Secco?


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Is he still open?  Anyone with the latest there? Thanks!

I realize it's only been a few hours since you posted this but the lack of response prompts me to say that the Mothership is not his anymore, but apparently there's a place next to the old shop, with, if I recall the story correctly, an Italianate name, out of which his products appear. I'm not enuf of an afficianado to trudge over there tomorrow but my curiousity is stirred. Come on Ptit Pois, Zouave, Felice, Paga and Louisa - you know the story. Cough up!

John Talbott

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I realize it's only been a few hours since you posted this but the lack of response prompts me to say that the Mothership is not his anymore, but apparently there's a place next to the old shop, with, if I recall the story correctly, an Italianate name, out of which his products appear.  I'm not enuf of an afficianado to trudge over there tomorrow but my curiousity is stirred.  Come on Ptit Pois, Zouave, Felice, Paga and Louisa - you know the story.  Cough up!

Cough cough

Well I can at least confirm he doesn't own the old business anymore but his office is still next door, 18, rue Jean-Nicot. He still bakes and produces stuff, he's sort of a freelance boulanger and consultant now. And he still drives that antique green truck.

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  • 7 months later...

Hello, France Forum,

I'm wondering if someone could clarify the status of what used to be Jean-Luc Poujauran's bakery in the Rue Jean Nicot in Paris (7th). I understand, from previous threads and other websites, that Jean-Luc sold it to Stephane Secco, and now only sells wholesale. Does anyone know approximately when this occurred?

And, what confuses me is this photograph I found online on this site.

It shows the old Boulangerie Poujauran with its pink facade, but then to the left is the Patisserie Secco. I thought Secco took over Poujauran... And if this is correct, did he keep the "Poujauran" name?

Are there really still two places side by side like this, or is this photo outdated?

Thank you for your help (I am writing a tiny piece for a local publication, and am hoping to get this straight).

V.

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I don't know all the details, but I believe there was a lawsuit between Jean-Luc Poujauran and Stéphane Secco: something about Secco buying the bakery *and* the name, thus preventing Poujauran from using his name in a business context.

The court ruled in favor of Poujauran (the whole thing lasted for years and was resolved in late 2005 / early 2006), who can now use his name for his wholesale activities, but apparently Secco can still use it on the storefront of the bakery. Unless, of course, that is the subject of another lawsuit.

Bottom line is: the bread sold to individuals on rue Jean Nicot is Secco's, not Poujauran's. But Poujauran has a lab on rue Jean Nicot (right next door to his old boulangerie) and the bread he makes there is sold to restaurants. I hear he also makes a fine galette des rois that one can order in bulk (01 47 05 80 88) for l'Epiphanie.

Clotilde.

Edited by Chocolate & Zucchini (log)
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Bottom line is: the bread sold to individuals on rue Jean Nicot is Secco's, not Poujauran's. But Poujauran has a lab on rue Jean Nicot (right next door to his old boulangerie) and the bread he makes there is sold to restaurants.

Clotilde.

Clotilde; would you agree the street looks pretty much like the photo in the link Veronica gave? I was by two weeks ago and I don't remember perfectly but I think the photo is up to date.

John Talbott

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Hi all,

Thank you so much for the responses! Sad to hear about the lawsuit - what a mess...

One more question about the photo: I thought Poujauran had only the pink store, which is 20 Rue Jean Nicot, right? But now there is also the white facade with Secco on the awning. Did Secco expand, and get the place next door, too? Is it a separate store, or connected to the pink store?

And Poujauran's wholesale lab would be to the right of the pink shop in the photo, right? (no awning)

What do you all think of Secco's offerings? Do you still go? During a recent trip I stopped by thinking it was Poujauran, so I didn't pay attention to these details. And I found many of the things Poujauran had become known for, including the loaves of fruit breads. Is Secco continuing in the same vein?

Thanks again, I really appreciate it. Wish I were there to go see for myself...

V.

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  • 1 month later...

hi guys,

i'm French friend of Patygirl, and i found this topic while visiting this website. Jean luc Poujauran sold his bakery rue Jean Nicot to Secco a couple of years ago now (2004 as far as i can remember).

Although Jean Luc Poujauran has nothing to do with these two shops anymore, he has auhtorized Secco to keep the blue sign "Poujauran" which was above the bakery window, which is why you can still see it hanging today, but secco and Poujauran don't do any business together. Now Poujauran is engaged in the wholesale business only: he still has premises on the rue Jean Nicot, which are not open to the public, and which are next to the Secco bakery.

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This may sound like a strange question...can anyone tell me if the boulangerie on rue Jean Nicot has seating of any kind?

The reason for the question is because a friend and I have rented an apartment nearby later in the year. We will both be arriving early morning, separate flights and taxi to the area. Our apartment will probably not be ready for us that early in the morning. The boulangerie is across the street from the building where our apartment is located. We could meet there and even have breakfast!

I bet they have no seating!! Any other suggestions??

Joan

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This may sound like a strange question...can anyone tell me if the boulangerie on rue Jean Nicot has seating of any kind?

The reason for the question is because a friend and I have rented an apartment nearby later in the year. We will both be arriving early morning, separate flights and taxi to the area. Our apartment will probably not be ready for us that early in the morning. The boulangerie is across the street from the building where our apartment is located. We could meet there and even have breakfast!

I bet they have no seating!! Any other suggestions??

Joan

I'll bet you're right (my memory is that there are no tables) but fear not, just up on St Dominique is the Patisserie Millet, 103 Rue St.-Dominique, tel 01.45.51.49.80 and my memory is good on that one; they do have tables and chairs, serve great tarte tatin and other pastries, coffee and tea, etc. The lady who runs it is terrific.

John Talbott

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I'll bet you're right (my memory is that there are no tables) but fear not, just up on St Dominique is the Patisserie Millet, 103 Rue St.-Dominique, tel 01.45.51.49.80 and my memory is good on that one; they do have tables and chairs, serve great tarte tatin and other pastries, coffee and tea, etc.  The lady who runs it is terrific.

Thanks for the reply, John.

I did a bit more research on the Patisserie Millet and found that it is closed on Mondays. Of course, we are arriving on a Monday!! Sounds like a good place for us to know about, though.

I did find a place called Les Deux Abeilles, 189, rue de l'Universite. Some nice things said about it.

I will be arriving in Paris on Feb. 5th so I will go there and see what will work for October. We just may have our individual taxis "deliver" us to this spot and work in our arrival meeting with the apt. people on Jean Nicot accordingly.

Any comments on the Les Deux Abeilles?

Thanks,

Joan

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  • 1 year later...

I'm just about to leave Paris this morning. I found Stephaine Secco last Tuesday and have been enjoying their baguettes quite a lot.

While I don't think I went to Millet, I do know that Le Moulin de la Vierge, 64 rue St. Dominique has a table to sit. It's an elegant and dark setting and the pastries are very nice.

If you have the chance, visit Pierre Herme in St. Germain (www.pierreherme.com). Went there yesterday and ended up spending quite a lot on stuff for myself and gifts for people back home who can appreciate. Pierre Herme did have the best macaron I've ever tasted.

Also, as I'm writing this, there's a small bakery called Ste. Veronique on the parallel road just south of St. Dominique (can't remember the name), but it's just west of rue Amelie (where my hotel is located) and the almond croissant there is quite good - in fact, I'm eating one now as I type this.

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And don't forget to visit Des Gateaux et du Pain in the 15th (her-pastry chef ex-Plaza,Hermé, Bristol, him (baker) ex-Moulin de la Vierge.

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Edited by fresh_a (log)

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