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Hamachi Tuna


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Anyone know where i could get some?

they have "sushi grade tuna" at Poisonnerie Nouveau Falero at Parc and Bernard, but I'm not sure if it's hamachi, as i am unaware what that is... :unsure:

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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Right, hamachi is not tuna. Hamachi is the young yellowtail, aka amberjack. A lot of folks confuse hamachi with tuna because there's a type of tuna called yellowfin, however they are not the same.

Edited to add: I was recently at Sushi Yasuda in New York and our sushi chef told us that there are four categories of yellowtail. Two were hamachi and buri (3 kilograms and 5 kilograms, I think). I can't remember the others -- I'd never heard of them before. I'm sure there's a whole interesting story behind it.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Right, hamachi is not tuna. Hamachi is the young yellowtail, aka amberjack. A lot of folks confuse hamachi with tuna because there's a type of tuna called yellowfin, however they are not the same.

Edited to add: I was recently at Sushi Yasuda in New York and our sushi chef told us that there are four categories of yellowtail. Two were hamachi and buri (3 kilograms and 5 kilograms, I think). I can't remember the others -- I'd never heard of them before. I'm sure there's a whole interesting story behind it.

Hamchi is a shusse uo. :biggrin:

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Sorry to butt in, but what exactly is hamachi tuna? :blink:  Or, is it hamachi (yellowtail) and maguro (tuna)?

Yes i was just wondering the same, maybe it is some canadian crossover thing half / half..

kingofswing01

I think you think about hamachi (yellowtail)(kingfish)(probally alot of other names..)

If you have anygood fish market they can probally get a half frozen Japanese hamachi for you, or from New Zealand. Is all up to you what you think is best the japanese is bigger and more fat, New Zealand is lighter in taste and color and less fat. most of the time it is very hard to get the fresh Japanese hamachi, but sometimes you can be lucky.. And all of the price is high..

In season you can get Amber Jack instead, also a little bigger then the Japanese hamachi, but a nice fish in my opinion, some big chefs goes around it but dunno really.

hope you can use some of these...

But if you only gonna buy like 200 gram go talk to your cool local nice japanese sushi frind and my sweet talk him to sell you some next they get..

Best regards,

Gilbert

Food blog - www.floss.dk

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According to this summary there are actually, in the Japanese system of classification, five categories of yellowtail -- and more than one word for each category:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...ndpost&p=712110

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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I know this is off-topic, but here is some information on yellowtails:

1. Adult yellowtails are called buri in any regin, by any person, by any fish shop, etc.

2. The term hamachi is now often used to mean cultured young yellowtails.

3. Buri are best in winter. Buri caught in winter are called kan buri. They are good as teriyaki and buri daikon. I like buri teriyaki! :wub:

4. Inada (same as hamachi) are best in summer. They are good as sashimi.

Edited to add:

Here is a nice webpage on buri by a Japanese in English, if anyone is interested.

Edited by Hiroyuki (log)
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