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Rolls for Thanksgiving


ErinB
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Ruth Gregas gave me this recipe a loooong time ago. It was not new to her I'm sure. It is a common recipe, much passed around. I make rolls for holidays and I make tea rings with it. I use lotsa butter and light brown sugar and a little flour for the filling. These days I add some pecan or walnut meal too. Decorated with cherries and walnut or pecan halves they are beautiful, delicious and oh yeah I drizzle them with a glaze.

What's fun is you can make the dough the night before, toss it in the frige and make up your rolls or whatever the next morning, let it rise then bake. Gives you more control of the process.

Potato Refrigerator Rolls

1 1/2 cup warm water (I use scalded milk)

2 pkg yeast

2/3 cup sugar & shortening ( I cut back on sugar for rolls)

1 1/2 teaspoon salt

2 eggs room temp

1 cup lukewarm mashed not seasoned potatoes

6 1/2 to 7 cups flour

I guess you could use butter but I always use shortening. (shoot me) It's a cleaner, clearer taste with shortening. Activate the yeast according to package directions in some of the slightly sweetened liquid. Being careful not to put the salt directly into the yeast mixture, put in all the rest of the ingredients reserving half the flour, combine well. Knead in the rest of the flour until you have a nice soft dough.

Place in an oiled container large enough to allow the dough to well double in size. A container that has a tight fitting lid. Turn the dough over in order to oil the surface everywhere. Put it in the frige and do your thing the next morning after punching down, make rolls or tea rings or cinnamon rolls or whatever. I just usually roll three little balls of dough per muffin cup & make a modified parkerhouse roll that way. Allow your creation to double in bulk for an hour & a half or two, then bake off at 350 degrees until golden brown.

Smells like heaven too!

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Funny, I just uploaded my family's favorite roll recipe to my blog. :) They're not particularly sophisticated, but they're definately yummy. I like the fact that they don't take particularly long to make, a great consideration when you're making everything else from uber-scratch, and that their consistency and flavor is just lovely. They are, in fact, a happy accident in my quest to reproduce another dinner roll that I miss terribly, only available from a Memphis landmark restaurant called Buntyn... utter soul food. Maybe one day I'll actually manage to approximate those heavenly-heavy treats, but I'm comforted by the fact that these are pretty darn good in and of themselves.

The recipe can be found on my blog <a href="http://www.homewitch.net/">here</a>. If you're looking for something delicious and really, really (REALLY) easy.. give 'em a try. :)

Happy Thanksgiving!

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Ruth Gregas gave me this recipe a loooong time ago. It was not new to her I'm sure. It is a common recipe, much passed around. I make rolls for holidays and I make tea rings with it. I use lotsa butter and light brown sugar and a little flour for the filling. These days I add some pecan or walnut meal too. Decorated with cherries and walnut or pecan halves they are beautiful, delicious and oh yeah I drizzle them with a glaze.

What's fun is you can make the dough the night before, toss it in the frige and make up your rolls or whatever the next morning, let it rise then bake. Gives you more control of the process.

Potato Refrigerator Rolls

1 1/2 cup warm water (I use scalded milk)

2 pkg yeast

2/3 cup sugar & shortening ( I cut back on sugar for rolls)

1 1/2 teaspoon salt

2 eggs room temp

1 cup lukewarm mashed not seasoned potatoes

6 1/2 to 7 cups flour

I guess you could use butter but I always use shortening. (shoot me) It's a cleaner, clearer  taste with shortening. Activate the yeast according to package directions in some of the slightly sweetened liquid. Being careful not to put the salt directly into the yeast mixture, put in all the rest of the ingredients reserving half the flour, combine well. Knead in the rest of the flour until you have a nice soft dough.

Place in an oiled container large enough to allow the dough to well double in size. A container that has a tight fitting lid. Turn the dough over in order to oil the surface everywhere. Put it in the frige and do your thing the next morning after punching down, make rolls or tea rings or cinnamon rolls or whatever. I just usually roll three little balls of dough per muffin cup & make a modified parkerhouse roll that way. Allow your creation to double in bulk for an hour & a half or two, then bake off at 350 degrees until golden brown.

Smells like heaven too!

Orangette just posted a thanksgiving recipe reminder list that included Sweet Potato rolls. Wonder how your recipe would do with mashed yams or sweet potatoes for the mashed potato part?

flavor floozy

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Here are my Gramma's rolls, the ones I make for every holiday. They are buttery and rich and really delicious, and not hard to make at all.

gallery_9138_54_27120.jpg

Makes 36 rolls, enough for ~ 12 people

3/4 cup milk

1/2 cup sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1/2 cup butter

3/4 cup warm water

1 Tb. yeast

2 eggs

5-6 cups flour

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Grease baking sheets.

Scald the milk (heat over medium flame until small bubbles appear around the edges); stir in sugar, salt and butter; cool to lukewarm. Measure the warm water into a large bowl. Sprinkle the in the yeast; stir until dissolved. Stir in the milk mixture, eggs and 3 cups flour; beat until smooth. Stir in additional flour to make a soft dough.

Turn dough out onto a floured board; knead until smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes. Place the dough in a bowl and cover. Let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk, about 30 minutes. Punch the dough down and turn out onto a lightly floured board.

Split dough into 3 pieces. Roll each piece into a 12 inch circle. Brush with melted butter, then cut into 12 wedges. Roll each wedge from the wide end to form a crescent, then place on baking sheet with the pointed end underneath. Squeeze sides together to form a "C" shape.

Bake at 350 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes, or until lightly golden. Brush with more melted butter and cool on racks.

These rolls freeze beautifully, which is a good thing - there are never enough!

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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Tejon, those look really good -- they remind me of something, but I can't quite put my finger on it. Is there some other kinda pastry that is made, in that rolled-up crescent shape? Maybe more browned on the surface, and possibly fluffier?

It really looks good, although I have this knee-jerk reaction that it should be darker, and more browned on the surface -- it must have been something I saw somewhere.

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Thanks Tejon, I used your recipe, mostly because it looked the easiest and I had everything on hand. 

They were excellent.

I'm so glad you enjoyed them! They really are pretty simple to make up, and everyone always loves them.

They do bear a striking resemblance to Pillsbury crescent rolls. Kind of funny, since the taste is absolutely nothing the same. I have had people take a look and laugh when I said I made them, thinking I just opened a can. The shapes are just the simplest one to make with no waste, which is why my Gramma formed them that way in the first place. Smart lady. :smile:

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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Ruth Gregas gave me this recipe a loooong time ago. It was not new to her I'm sure. It is a common recipe, much passed around. I make rolls for holidays and I make tea rings with it. I use lotsa butter and light brown sugar and a little flour for the filling. These days I add some pecan or walnut meal too. Decorated with cherries and walnut or pecan halves they are beautiful, delicious and oh yeah I drizzle them with a glaze.

What's fun is you can make the dough the night before, toss it in the frige and make up your rolls or whatever the next morning, let it rise then bake. Gives you more control of the process.

Potato Refrigerator Rolls

1 1/2 cup warm water (I use scalded milk)

2 pkg yeast

2/3 cup sugar & shortening ( I cut back on sugar for rolls)

1 1/2 teaspoon salt

2 eggs room temp

1 cup lukewarm mashed not seasoned potatoes

6 1/2 to 7 cups flour

I guess you could use butter but I always use shortening. (shoot me) It's a cleaner, clearer  taste with shortening. Activate the yeast according to package directions in some of the slightly sweetened liquid. Being careful not to put the salt directly into the yeast mixture, put in all the rest of the ingredients reserving half the flour, combine well. Knead in the rest of the flour until you have a nice soft dough.

Place in an oiled container large enough to allow the dough to well double in size. A container that has a tight fitting lid. Turn the dough over in order to oil the surface everywhere. Put it in the frige and do your thing the next morning after punching down, make rolls or tea rings or cinnamon rolls or whatever. I just usually roll three little balls of dough per muffin cup & make a modified parkerhouse roll that way. Allow your creation to double in bulk for an hour & a half or two, then bake off at 350 degrees until golden brown.

Smells like heaven too!

Orangette just posted a thanksgiving recipe reminder list that included Sweet Potato rolls. Wonder how your recipe would do with mashed yams or sweet potatoes for the mashed potato part?

I wonder. I did make one batch for Thanksgiving but I mean I often make beaucoups of batches and next time I do multiples, maybe Christmas, I will try one with the sweet potato. Interesting idea. Maybe I should use the water used to boil the white potatoes in the sweet potato one. I will report back when I try this.

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Tejon, I also made your Gramma's recipe and it turned out great! I didn't bother shaping them into crescents; just formed them into golf balls and placed them on a baking sheet. Still turned out fine, though. After removing them from the oven I brushed them with butter mixed with honey for a little added sweetness. Probably a bit too rich for me to serve every day, but perfect for a special occasion.

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