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Hand Crank Meat Grinder


jsmith
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I want to grind my own meat, ranging from about half a pound to three pounds at a time (not very frequently). I figure I should be getting a hand crank meat grinder.

I've researched what I could, but all I could find was that #10 seems to be the size to get for casual use. Other than that, what should I be looking for?

Is there some killer brand from 50 years ago that is the only brand to get? Is there a current brand that is better?

Is clamp on the side of the counter better, or free standing?

Are different models easier to clean?

I see a bunch on ebay for $10-$20, but they all look pretty similar to the untrained eye.

Also, on grinding meat, I've seen posts here referring to cleaning meat before grinding. What does cleaning meat involve?

Thanks for any advice.

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In my opinion, the #1 thing which trumps all else is ease of cleaning. I have an old old meat grinder. It's so difficult to clean that I never use it. Plus ALL the internal parts are made of some kind of metal that rusts (cast iron, I'd guess) so after cleaning you then have to brush a little oil on it so that it doesn't rust. Total PITA.

Someone should really make a meat grinder with ceramic parts inside that you could just put in the dishwasher or something. (If there is such a beast, please post about it!)

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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I have a cheap counter top meat grinder that I really hate using. My need is also for grinding small amounts maybe once or twice a week, but even this level of use is a real chore....I find it hard work to grind, the suction pad is hopeless for my work surfaces and I always end up with a bruise on the heel of my hand where I've been trying to hold it still and grind at the same time. It is however very easy to clean. The brand is Kitchencraft and it was about £15.

I asked for advice here a week or so ago about buying either an attachment for my kitchen aid or getting an electric one. The link to the thread is below (it got merged with a thread from a couple of years ago). I know you have specifically expressed an interest in a hand held grinder but I thought you might find some useful information this thread anyway.

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...20grinder&st=60

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Thanks for the fast replys. I didn't realize the hand crankers were such a pain.

To be honest, I'm not much of a ground meat kind of guy. I probably use it less than once a month, so I figured an electric grinder would be overkill for me.

Is it the general consensus that hand powered meat grinders are more trouble than they're worth, or do Bleachboy and Rachellindsay just have a couple lemons?

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Thanks for the fast replys.  I didn't realize the hand crankers were such a pain.

To be honest, I'm not much of a ground meat kind of guy.  I probably use it less than once a month, so I figured an electric grinder would be overkill for me.

Is it the general consensus that hand powered meat grinders are more trouble than they're worth, or do Bleachboy and Rachellindsay just have a couple lemons?

I guess my kitchen work surfaces are part of the problem as they are tiled and if I stick it to a melamine tray I then have problems with that skating about. I agree a clamp would be much better. I didn't do much research when I bought mine so I didn't really think about the problems I might have with it....I just assumed the one I bought would be fine.

I am now weighing up spending a bit more and getting an electric one. The US models recommended in the thread I posted earlier looked great but the weight of them would make shipping from the US quite a daunting expense. I have put this on the back burner for myself for the moment but I did see that you can get a Moulinex for about £60 in John Lewis. The KitchenAid attachment is about the same price I think.

I'm now going to investigate clamp hand-helds as well. I hadn't come across that sort before.

Rachel

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This is the type that is most common

clamp type meat mincer

You have to take it apart and wash the parts in soapy water and make sure they are dry before storing them - don't put it back together to store - put it and all the parts in a plastic bag along with the instructions. If you can find one of the little packets of stuff that keeps things dry, often packaged with vitamin capsules and with electronic stuff, put one of those in the bag.

This electric meat mincer is very similar to one recently introduced in the states that has received good reviews.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Cleaning the meat refers to removing all sinew and silverskin, which can clog up the plate.

I have a grinder attachment for the KitchenAid which works fairl well. Outside of the place, everytning cleans easily.

But, have you asked the person at your local butcher counter if they will grind the meat for you?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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A slightly different perspective:

I too have owned one of those clamp-to-the-counter hand-cranked meat grinders with lots of cast iron parts. My mom owned one too, and I used to love helping to crank stuff through it when I was a kid, so I admittedly have a bunch of nostalgia attached to that style of gizmo.

The heavy metal grinder, when properly clamped to a good sturdy counter, is pretty darned stable--not like the kind meant to suction-cup to a countertop. We only used it a few times a year (usually either to make chopped liver or cranberry-orange relish), so the business of cleaning and drying the several little parts didn't get all that onerous. I might have felt otherwise, however, if we were using and cleaning it weekly or more frequently.

Oh yeah, both my and my mom's grinder had this problem with juices seeping through the cracks. I think it's inevitable with these things, since if you tighten the screw enough to prevent drips, the crank becomes almost impossible to turn. Mom and I dealt with the situation by keeping the screw loose enough to make cranking easy, and just putting a bowl underneath the grinder to catch drips. Again, if this were a weekly ritual I might get tired of the drip thing, but as a few-times-a-year ritual I didn't mind.

Edited by mizducky (log)
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This is the type that is most common

clamp type meat mincer

You have to take it apart and wash the parts in soapy water and make sure they are dry before storing them - don't put it back together to store - put it and all the parts in a plastic bag along with the instructions. If you can find one of the little packets of stuff that keeps things dry, often packaged with vitamin capsules and with electronic stuff, put one of those in the bag.

This electric meat mincer is very similar to one recently introduced in the states that has received good reviews.

Andie....thanks for pointing out these UK sources....much appreciated.

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Thanks for all the advice for everyone. I guess I'll have to think some more about if it's worth the bother to get a grinder.

I've never asked a butcher to grind meat for me because I assumed that they would just clean the thing once a day and have little bits of other meat building up in it throughout the day sitting at room temperature.

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I don't think it would be an issue for you because 1-3 lbs a few times/month is no big deal. I've had my grandmother clamp meat grinder exactly like This one and never had issues with it other than the juice dripping part. It comes apart real easily and cleans just as easily. I say get the hand crank one.

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  • 1 month later...
I've been thinking of getting a meat grinder, primarily to grind my own hamburger.

Looking for a simple, manual one that's reasonable to buy and easy to clean.  Anyone know of such a thing?

Do you own a Kitchen-Aid stand mixer? If so, I highly recommend their meat grinder attachment, which I think goes for around $50. It's easy to use, dishwasher safe, etc.

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Slkinsey, my guess is that "manual" means a hand-crank one. In any case, a while ago I stumbled on a company that offers all kinds of interesting kitchen stuff called Lehman's, and they have a whole section of meat grinders. Here

is a link to the page. I honestly don't know anything about the company, or the grinders, but they look good. I'm sure others with actually hands-on knowledge will chime in.

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Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Here is a thread on electric meat grinders. I have used the attachment to my KA and it works well but was looking for something more substantial that would produce less heat. I opted for the Tasin TS 108. Works very well. I just used it to grind beef and lamb for moussaka and home made gyros.

edited due to link already posted above.

Edited by scubadoo97 (log)
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A note on the KitchenAid grinder attachment: because of its plastic body it really doesn't work well on tough jobs (e.g. pork skin for cotechino sausage). I had one break to pieces in the middle of a session.

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A note on the KitchenAid grinder attachment: because of its plastic body it really doesn't work well on tough jobs (e.g. pork skin for cotechino sausage). I had one break to pieces in the middle of a session.

I've used mine quite a bit -- and I even store it in the freezer when it's not in use -- and I have never had anything like that happen. But, I have to admit that looking at that molded piece of plastic, I've wondered how long it would be until the thing finally goes. That said, I've seen new, replacement units for as low as $30, so I've not worried too much about its durability. Even if I had to replace it once a year, at $30, it would be a relatively good value.

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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I've touted them before as a source for "prosumer" grade supplier of food processing equipment, but it's hard to do better than Cabela's.

I've linked to the manual ones, but they carry a large line of both manual and motorized grinders (including a really cool one for those "Hardware Enthusiasts" out there).

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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I've touted them before as a source for "prosumer" grade supplier of food processing equipment, but it's hard to do better than Cabela's.

I've linked to the manual ones, but they carry a large line of both manual and motorized grinders (including a really cool one for those "Hardware Enthusiasts" out there).

I love their stuff and have purchased all sorts of high-quality sausage making supplies from Cabela's. I've actually been considering this, larger unit. If I had a decent place to store it, I'd be a bit more inclined to actually make the purchase. :wink:

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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If I had a decent place to store it, I'd be a bit more inclined to actually make the purchase. :wink:

=R=

A place to store the gear or a place to store all of that charcuterie?

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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