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Best place to buy organic chicken


Veghead
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I'm wondering if there is a good source locally (Vancouver) to buy free range/organic/no drugs/happy chicken. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Not sure that their prices are the most competitive, but Capers regularly stocks organic chicken, as well as their 'specialty' chicken, which I gather means free range, but not necessarily antibiotic free - and is less expensive than the organic version. Also, Market Meats in Kits usually offers free range chicken. At Capers I can usually get a whole specialty chicken for about $14-$18 that, when roasted and served with potatoes and veggies, feeds the two of us easily, plus leftovers for a chicken sandwich the next day or to put in a soup made with a stock from the carcass.

Laura Fauman

Vancouver Magazine

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Have you checked Famous Foods on Kingsway? Their prices may be better than Capers.

Plus, isn't there a chicken place along Commercial Drive (near 1st Avenue, next to the Kitchen Corner?) Last time I was there, they had organic chicken and it was very inexpensive.

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Hi!

(first post from an occasional lurker who just discovered that she can post)

Our happy chickens come from Stong's market on Dunbar (often on sale too). I don't know if the free range is also organic (I think there's also organic available but I don't know if that's free-range :hmmm: ), but I'm sure they can tell you more if you call.

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Save On Foods (various locations) stock Bradner Farms brand organic chicken. Around $15 per, good muscle tone, lean, and tasty too!

They don't come with that 'stained' skin that I've seen on some brands. I thought the skin colour was a natural gold/yellow tinge, signifying, for this optimist, a free-run upbringing, until, on closer inspection, I found that the inside of the bag is coated with a dye that transfers to the skin of the chicken, to give the appearance of a farmyard background. Bleech!

John

"Venite omnes qui stomacho laboratis et ego restaurabo vos"

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I started a thread on this topic a while back because although I could find organic chickens, I couldn't find BIG ones. With two teenage boys I need at least a 4 pounder, and 5 lbs. is best.

I now buy them at Whole Foods. They always have ones at least 4 lbs.

Paul B

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I don't know if the free range is also organic (I think there's also organic available but I don't know if that's free-range  :hmmm: ), but I'm sure they can tell you more if you call.

My understanding is that in the case of eggs, those labelled Organic must be Free Range, so I assume the same would hold true of chickens.

I usually buy the Bradner Farms at Save On, but they are not huge. I will check out WF next time I am there.

The sea was angry that day my friends... like an old man trying to send back soup in a deli.

George Costanza

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Save On Foods (various locations) stock Bradner Farms brand organic chicken. Around $15 per, good muscle tone, lean, and tasty too!

They don't come with that 'stained' skin that I've seen on some brands. I thought the skin colour was a natural gold/yellow tinge, signifying, for this optimist, a free-run upbringing, until, on closer inspection, I found that the inside of the bag is coated with a dye that transfers to the skin of the chicken, to give the appearance of a farmyard background. Bleech!

John

And I thought that chicken with white skin had been bleached or something. What should a natural colour be for free-range/organic chicken?

Laura Fauman

Vancouver Magazine

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They don't come with that 'stained' skin that I've seen on some brands. I thought the skin colour was a natural gold/yellow tinge, signifying, for this optimist, a free-run upbringing, until, on closer inspection, I found that the inside of the bag is coated with a dye that transfers to the skin of the chicken, to give the appearance of a farmyard background. Bleech!

John

If a chicken has had corn in its diet it will have a yellow tinge- light skin colour does not mean they do something to it. Also different breads can have different colours.

Steve

Cook To Live; Live To Cook
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They don't come with that 'stained' skin that I've seen on some brands. I thought the skin colour was a natural gold/yellow tinge, signifying, for this optimist, a free-run upbringing, until, on closer inspection, I found that the inside of the bag is coated with a dye that transfers to the skin of the chicken, to give the appearance of a farmyard background. Bleech!

John

If a chicken has had corn in its diet it will have a yellow tinge- light skin colour does not mean they do something to it. Also different breads can have different colours.

Steve

Yep, corn or grain does seem to affect the colour, mainly of the fat though. I guess the optimism I referred to earlier was for a dry-processed bird, the skin of which would be the natural, sometimes yellowish colour. This colour might be further deepened by the singeing a good butcher would give to his dressed poultry. I'm sure all the chooks we get in the Lower Mainland, organic or otherwise, are wet-processed, thus the white, wet skin.

My primary indicator is the colour of the leg flesh under the skin; a purplish hue suggests the bird was something of an athlete, and therefore may have decent tone and taste. That and the yellow fat.

While on the poultry theme (sorry about the rant, moderator!) the size of most organic fryers and roasters is pretty standard, and you don't find many oversize birds, as Paul B was enquiring of some time ago, here. They do take longer to grow, and would be out of cycle with their peers, but butchers don't like to carry them as the price for a 7 pounder is likely to mean it will get very lonely, and smelly, in the display case!

Choices Markets stock Thomas Reid's organic chickens, which are always reliable, as well as a set-like-a-jelly organic chicken stock.

John

"Venite omnes qui stomacho laboratis et ego restaurabo vos"

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